ACLU backs Wiccan suit

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by -Cp, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. -Cp
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    -Cp Senior Member

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    THIS IS SUCH A LOAD OF HORSE CRAP!!!! You KNOW if this was a Christian wanting to Pray the ACLU would be trying to STOP IT!

    RICHMOND -- Civil liberties lawyers have appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to allow a Wiccan priestess to offer prayers before a public board's meetings.
    Cynthia Simpson was turned down in 2002 when she asked the Chesterfield Board of Supervisors to add her name to the list of people who customarily open the board's meetings with a religious invocation.
    The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the suburban Richmond county.
    In their petition, received by the court yesterday, American Civil Liberties Union lawyers accuse the federal appeals court of trying to "obscure with legal smoke and mirrors" Chesterfield's preference for mainline religions.
    "Although Establishment Clause jurisprudence may be beset with conflicting tests, uncertain outcomes and ongoing debate, one principle has never been compromised ... that one religious denomination cannot be officially preferred over another," ACLU attorneys wrote in their 13-page filing.
    County officials said they had the right to limit the prayers to Judeo-Christian beliefs and religions based on a single god.
    Though many variations exist, the Wiccan faith is a generally a multi-deity religion with strong focus on Earth and seasonal cycles, also defined as a form of witchcraft.
    "The First Amendment prohibits governments from having an official religion," ACLU Virginia's legal director, Rebecca Glenberg, said in an interview.
    Chesterfield County Attorney Steven Micas was out of the office and not available for comment yesterday.
    In 2003, a federal judge ruled the Chesterfield restriction unconstitutional. A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit in Richmond reversed that decision in April.
    Miss Simpson's battle mirrors a 2004 case in which Wiccan high priestess Darla Kaye Wynne sued the town of Great Falls, S.C., for specifying that prayers at government meetings invoke the name Jesus Christ.
    A federal judge ultimately ruled in Miss Wynne's favor. The appeals court later upheld the ruling -- a decision ACLU attorneys initially thought settled the matter of meeting prayers.
    But the court disagreed.
    "Our case wasn't specifically about the content of the prayers. It was about who was to give the prayers," Miss Glenberg said. "They just didn't think it was the same kind of case."
    Miss Glenberg called the case a question of whether government officials can cherry pick when it comes to religious matters.
    "It sets a precedent for allowing the government to treat people differently based on their religion," she said. "It's that part that's troubling."

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/metro/20050809-101320-1232r.htm
     
  2. archangel
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    Just one cult supporting another...wicca is allowed in the military...so I suppose they are just trying to gain military support...funny though cause they attacked the military on the "Boy Scout" issue...The ACLU must go as of yesterday...Rico statues I say! or "Men in Black" :blues:
     
  3. MissileMan
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    MissileMan Senior Member

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    You apparently missed the part of the article that talks about opening these public board meetings with a religious invocation. I didn't see anything in the article to indicate that the ACLU was trying to prevent religious invocations, only allow for all faiths to be represented. Another over-reaction on your part, but one obviously motivated by the Christian tolerance we hear so much about. :poke:
     
  4. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Of course the ACLU backs it. It's perverted. You're surprised?
     
  5. MissileMan
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    MissileMan Senior Member

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    You don't think that's a tad extreme? You don't really think all things non-Christian are perversions do you?
     
  6. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    Do you honestly believe Wicca is perverted? In what way? Or is it simply any religion that might not be Christianity?
     
  7. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    I am not indicting difference. I am indicting those who think the majority should have to bow to the whims of the minority. The ACLU represents nothing else -- the tyranny of the minority.
     
  8. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    Okay, at the opening of these meetings there is a religious invocation. The person giving the invocation is chosen from a specific list of regional religious leaders that did not include Wicca. This person simply wanted her religion to be represented like the others that were represented. How is it tyranny?
     
  9. MissileMan
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    MissileMan Senior Member

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    I'm not sure that you can justify calling this woman's religion or her desire to have her faith held in the same regard as Christianity a whim.
     
  10. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Wiccans account for what percent of ANY population? Yet this woman wants to force her religious views on the majority when it is quite clear no one else (except the ACLU of course) wants to hear them.

    Sounds like tyranny of the minority to me. The ACLU will find a justice to support them, the woman will win, and the majority will be forced to listen to bunch of crap they don't believe in.

    I will add this .... I firmly believe that if there is ANY question regarding prayer, then one should not be given at all. If everyone is a Christian or whatever, and all agree to a PRIVATE prayer prior to state busniess, no problem.
     

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