a True Patriot

Discussion in 'Congress' started by midcan5, Apr 5, 2008.

  1. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Sorry. I'm not a 1930's German. I'm not sold by good salesmen. Words not backed by action mean very little.
     
  2. ReillyT
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    ReillyT Senior Member

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    When he is elected President, we will be able to test the rhetoric. I look forward to the day.
     
  3. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    Really liberation theology doesn't subscribe to violence, it's a mix of black power and christianity admitted by its founder, James Cone. Well here you go, you can watch the video for yourself.

    http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/about_king/encyclopedia/black_power.html
    Martin Luther King, Jr., believed that Black Power was ‘‘essentially an emotional concept’’ that meant ‘‘different things to different people,’’ but he worried that the slogan carried ‘‘connotations of violence and separatism’’ and opposed its use (King, 32; King, 14 October 1966). The controversy over Black Power reflected and perpetuated a split in the civil rights movement between organizations that maintained that nonviolent methods were the only way to achieve civil rights goals and those organizations that had become frustrated and were ready to adopt violence and black separatism.
    On 16 June 1966, while completing the march begun by James Meredith, Stokely Carmichael of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) rallied a crowd in Greenwood, Mississippi, with the cry, ‘‘We want Black Power!’’ Although SNCC members had used the term during informal conversations, this was the first time Black Power was used as a public slogan. Asked later what he meant by the term, Carmichael said, ‘‘When you talk about black power you talk about bringing this country to its knees any time it messes with the black man … any white man in this country knows about power. He knows what white power is and he ought to know what black power is’’ (‘‘Negro Leaders on ‘Meet the Press’’’). In the ensuing weeks, both SNCC and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) repudiated nonviolence and embraced militant separatism with Black Power as their objective.

    http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/about_king/encyclopedia/black_power.html
     
  4. CrimsonWhite
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    CrimsonWhite *****istrator Emeritus Supporting Member

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    I think your tin foil hat is on too tight.
     
  5. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    Opps I posted the King article twice, here is Cone's video.

    http://astuteblogger.blogspot.com/2008/03/video-20-mintues-with-black-liberation.html
     
  6. ReillyT
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    ReillyT Senior Member

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    So to point out that black liberation theology (a rather vague term) is the equivalent of the KKK, you bring out rhetoric by Stokely Carmichael in the 1960s?
     
  7. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    That's what the founder, James Cone, based his theology on.
     
  8. ReillyT
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    ReillyT Senior Member

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    Here is another quote from James Cone.

    http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/11232007/watch.html

    The whole interview is on the site. I encourage you to read it.
     
  9. Taomon
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    Taomon Active Member

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    Affirmative action was not a Nixon mandate. What I said was that white reaped most of the benefits of racial inequality...until the mid to late 1970's when Nixon destroyed the Bretton Woods system.

    This created an ever widening gap between the rich and the poor. It was the middle class who were hit the hardest...white working class people.

    When Affirmative Action came along, whites hated it because for the first time in American history they felt what black people had been going through for decades.

    Whites screamed bloody murder and to this day denounce affirmative action. Where were those cries when it was blacks experiencing these inequities?
     
  10. jreeves
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    jreeves Senior Member

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    And he says basically in one of his interviews whites today have to make up for the atrocities committed by their ancestors for them to be accepted. I mean if you want to take his comments into context then keep reading, Dr. King didn't agree with his radicalism for a reason.
     

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