A partial solution that will help.......

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by ABikerSailor, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. ABikerSailor
    Offline

    ABikerSailor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Messages:
    31,360
    Thanks Received:
    4,794
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    Amarillo TX
    Ratings:
    +8,410
    I'm placing this in Current Events, because this involves something that is currently in the news, as well as has affected my life personally, right now.

    My room mate was recently diagnosed with cancer. She's got good insurance, so that's not a worry, but this is........

    Because the doctors had to find out what was wrong with her, she was prescribed quite a few medications, some of which she had bad reactions to and stopped taking.

    Incidentally, she's still got quite a few of those medications, many of which are heart medications and the like (not narcotics), and she can't use them.

    She went back to the pharmacy to try to give them back, as she didn't want to flush them down the toilet because it's also been on the news quite a bit that the city water systems have started to become polluted due to all the people flushing medication.

    She was told they couldn't be returned, and she had to figure out something to do with them.

    There are a lot of people here in Amarillo who could benefit from donated medications. My question is, why can't someone like the Salvation Army or some other charity set up a pharmacy where they could take the medications back, check them and make sure they're still viable and safe, and then whoever came over with a prescription from a doctor could get their meds filled there if they didn't have money?

    My roomie likened it to having a full plate of good food, going outside and seeing the homeless, and then just throwing the food on the ground and walking away. I sort of see it the same as well.

    Anyone have thoughts on this subject? I'd really like a couple of good ideas so that maybe this kind of program could get started.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. Lonestar_logic
    Offline

    Lonestar_logic Republic of Texas

    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,318
    Thanks Received:
    2,193
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Ratings:
    +3,505
    This is the dumbest post I've ever read.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  3. ABikerSailor
    Offline

    ABikerSailor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Messages:
    31,360
    Thanks Received:
    4,794
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    Amarillo TX
    Ratings:
    +8,410
    Why? Do you think that flushing medication and polluting the water system is more preferable to donating medication that you can't use any longer? By the way, these scripts are fresh.

    It's just that when I hear of something that is wasteful and harmful like that, I want to know if there is a solution that can help.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  4. Granny
    Offline

    Granny Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,121
    Thanks Received:
    785
    Trophy Points:
    200
    Location:
    Rocky Top, TN
    Ratings:
    +1,255
    My pharmacy accepts returned unused or outdated medications so that they can be properly disposed of. I don't think its a particularly good idea to donate leftover drugs to shelters, free clinics, etc. because there's too much room for a terrible mistake to be made in redistribution and it's likely that a doctor would not take a chance on redistribution of someone else's drugs. Also, I think it's a federal law that prescription drugs cannot be passed around from one person to another.

    Maybe instead of saying she's "returning" the drugs she should say she would like the pharmacy to correctly dispose of the drugs so as to cut down on contamination of water systems, etc. That's what I say and I've never had a problem. These pharmacies probably have (or have access to) proper biohazard disposal resources.
     
  5. ABikerSailor
    Offline

    ABikerSailor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Messages:
    31,360
    Thanks Received:
    4,794
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    Amarillo TX
    Ratings:
    +8,410
    Yeah.......but what about a charity that gets a pharmacist to volunteer? He could then check the meds, make sure they're good and put them into the stock.

    That way, homeless people could get their heart meds and no impact on healthcare costs.
     
  6. Lonestar_logic
    Offline

    Lonestar_logic Republic of Texas

    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,318
    Thanks Received:
    2,193
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Ratings:
    +3,505
    No, I think throwing them in the trash bin makes more sense. There is one group that recycles Aids medicine it's called RAMP (Recycled AIDS Medicine Program), it's a project stemming from the New Humanist Movement, gathers unused HIV medicines and delivers them to organizations overseas.
     
  7. RetiredGySgt
    Offline

    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    39,517
    Thanks Received:
    5,898
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Ratings:
    +8,928
    To many things could go wrong and then the sue happy United States would have even more law suits. Some things no matter how good intended or smart can not be done due to the ability of the people to sue.
     
  8. Terry
    Offline

    Terry Shut the $%$ Up!

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    Messages:
    5,222
    Thanks Received:
    1,090
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +1,091
    The cost to test those pills to see if they are safe would be too costly. They cannot go off anyone's word that they are safe. It only takes one asshole to spoil the bunch.

    What I do to dispose of old meds is, crush them up, put it back in the bottle, ad a little water, or coffee grounds, scratch off my name on the label then I put it in the trash.

    I would call your health department to see if there is some collection system. Some states have them. Some doctors let you bring them back in and they will trash them.

    Do not flush them down the toilet or sink. That is the worse thing to do. If it is a liquid ad kitty litter to it. No pets or humans will get into that. Over time the medical aspect on some meds break down.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  9. Mr.Fitnah
    Offline

    Mr.Fitnah Dreamcrusher

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2009
    Messages:
    14,480
    Thanks Received:
    2,673
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Paradise.
    Ratings:
    +2,673
    The medical examiners office will dispose of them, You can not redistribute controlled substances back into the system once they have been out of a controlled environment .
     
  10. Zoom-boing
    Offline

    Zoom-boing Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    25,061
    Thanks Received:
    7,260
    Trophy Points:
    260
    Location:
    East Japip
    Ratings:
    +10,120
    The pharmacist wouldn't take them back so they could be disposed of properly? I find that ludicrous. If I were her I'd contact other pharmacies and find one that would take them. If that's still a no go contact the drug maker and ask them for help. The pharma sales reps don't just toss expired samples; they're returned and destroyed.

    I'm sorry about her dx. My cousin, who is in her late 50's and a breast cancer survivor, just found out she has pancreatic cancer. It's in her liver as well. Not good. :(
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1

Share This Page