A Guide for Our Allies on How to Work With the US Military

Discussion in 'Military' started by longknife, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. longknife
    Online

    longknife Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    37,183
    Thanks Received:
    11,475
    Trophy Points:
    1,400
    Location:
    Sin City
    Ratings:
    +23,145
    [​IMG]

    As a vet, I find this very true – and very hilarious.

    Here are some highlights about how to work with the U.S. military:

    Expect meetings, lots of them But if you go for consensus-based decisions at those meetings, the military officers will consider you “inefficient and lacking focus.” (The guide hints that autonomous relief organizations will balk at getting orders. I smell trouble.)

    They will want “in-depth” data about what you are doing. But they are sometimes reluctant to share their own info, citing “operational security.”

    If you don’t have plans, the military will make them for you—and will do so from its own perspective. “The military will generally fill the void as it sees fit.”

    Their top priority will be protecting their force, and that will affect your operations, “freedom of movement, security and logistics.”

    None of the above applies to Special Operators, who are a different breed. “Some significant differences separate these units and individuals from the standard military profile.” In other words, the SOF guys are a bunch of hippies, “culturally aware” and “more flexible and creative and less rigid in their thoughts and ideas.”

    Find the Joint Task Force commander’s chief of staff. Tell him who you are and what you are doing. He is, the guide tells us, the “gatekeeper.”

    When working with data, the international relief organizations will use the metric system, but U.S. military will not, at least for things like amounts of potable water available. They just like gallons, OK? You got a problem with that? GTFO with your kiloliters.

    If you depend on the military for housing, food, communications or transportation, you risk being seen as a “support requirement,” not an asset.

    From There Already *Is* A Rough Guide to Working With The US Military, And It's Pretty Funny
     
    • Funny and Agree!! Funny and Agree!! x 1
  2. whitehall
    Offline

    whitehall Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    36,834
    Thanks Received:
    6,240
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    Western Va.
    Ratings:
    +21,341
    You never saw this stuff during the Obama administration. Not only is it not funny but it seems to be intentionally insulting and disruptive to the Administration that is trying to pull these coalitions together. The author Tom Ricks never served in the Military and the best I can find is that he accused Fox of being a "tool of the republican party" when they ran a story critical of the Obama administration's handling of Benghazi.
     
  3. longknife
    Online

    longknife Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    37,183
    Thanks Received:
    11,475
    Trophy Points:
    1,400
    Location:
    Sin City
    Ratings:
    +23,145
    I didn't see anything political in this. As someone who served 23 years, I found almost everything to be true. Funny but true.
     
  4. harmonica
    Offline

    harmonica Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Messages:
    9,716
    Thanks Received:
    1,051
    Trophy Points:
    290
    Ratings:
    +5,143
    I doubt the Brits will put up with any crap from anybody's military
    the others are professionals also
    ...I've worked with the French, French Foreign Legion, Italians, Spanish, Portuguese, and many South American military
    ....I worked with Tunisians, and they were not ''good''
     

Share This Page