5 Million Aquatic Animals Die at Mara River in Kenya

Discussion in 'Conspiracy Theories' started by deebee, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. deebee
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    deebee Member

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    Well folks, another 5 million sea animals have been killed...

    But i guess this is all just ''normal'' and happens all the time (yeah right)

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 18, 2014
  2. Douger
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    Douger BANNED

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  3. Defiant1
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    Defiant1 Gold Member

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    I bet it was those 3 SUVs they have in Kenya caused this.
     
  4. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Heard a report, yesterday, on the state of the coral reefs worldwide.

    Truly this is a chilling report.

    About one BILLION people survive because of the coral reefs.

    Those places are where most of the world's fishstock thrive.

    But the acidifcation of the ocean is making it very difficult for the coral reefs to thrive.

    And if acidifaction is destroying the coral reefs it is also destroying those ocean plankton that ALSO depend on calcium shells to survive.

    And without those the whole damned oceanic ecosystem is at risk.

    INCLUDING, I note the balance between the plant live on the micro level that generate MOST OF THE WORLD'S OXYGEN.

    WE are living in a worldwide CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT, folks.

    And NOBODY is in charge of it, either.

    If the ocean goes too acidic?

    We all die.

    Seriously. We ALL die.

    Live on earth will change and survive, but mankind isn't likely to.
     
  5. deebee
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    deebee Member

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    Oh my that's very worrying and sad :-(

    Here's a passage from the bible that could be related to fish kills.

    << Hosea 4 >>
    New American Standard Bible
    3Therefore the land mourns,
    And everyone who lives in it languishes
    Along with the beasts of the field and the birds of the sky,
    And also the fish of the sea disappear.

    God Bless
     
  6. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    This thread does NOT belong in Conspiracy theory.

    There's nothing conspiratorial or theoretical about it.

    What moderator made this editorial decision?
     
  7. deebee
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    deebee Member

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    True

    There is no conspiracy about this.

    It's just Gods natural will.

    Forgive me.
     
  8. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    deebee believes that there's a brown dwarf near the asteroid belt, and that its proximity is messing with our climate and wildlife--a precursor to the apocalypse.

    She hasn't explicitly drawn a connection between that myth and this event, here, so I'll give her the benefit of the doubt. But just google "mara river kenya aquatic animals". I'm not saying this hasn't happened, just that there's not much coverage on what appears to be a major environmental event. So perhaps that 5 million figure hasn't been verified yet for large outlets to run that kind of headline.



    But there's no doubt that human agriculture practices in Africa are having a negative effect on the environment. A WWF-funded study concluded that a giraffe population in a Kenyan wildlife area has declined 95% over the past 20 years.

    Giraffe numbers in Kenya's Masai Mara down 95% | Environment | guardian.co.uk
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2011
  9. dailhusten
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    dailhusten BANNED

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    What the kenya government is doing if they do not have enough fund to save the life of aquatic animal they should take help from the other government. This video has open everybody eyes.
     
  10. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Relax editec. As usual the reports are a little short on truthful data. The average pH of the oceans is 8.1. If you burned everything on the planet the CO2 going into solution would drop the pH to 8.0.......and that's burning EVERYTHING. 8 is a long way from acidic.
    There could be local areas where the pH level drops lower but so far the lowest level recorded is I think around 7.8 to 7.9.

    So far the "loss" of coral is 2.1% as you can see by the links I've provided you. That is within the error probability so in point of fact there may not be any loss at all. Even wikipedia reports that corals actually respond quite well in acidic environments. In short, keep the crap off the reefs but other than that there is no need to worry.

    The PETM is accompanied by a mass extinction of 35-50% of benthic foraminifera (especially in deeper waters) over the course of ~1,000 years - the group suffering more than during the dinosaur-slaying K-T extinction. Contrarily, planktonic foraminifera diversified, and dinoflagellates bloomed. Success was also enjoyed by the mammals, who radiated profusely around this time.

    The deep-sea extinctions are difficult to explain, as many were regional in extent (mainly affecting the north Atlantic). General hypotheses such as a temperature-related reduction in oxygen availability, or increased corrosiveness due to carbonate-undersaturated deep waters, are insufficient as explanations. The only factor which was global in extent was an increase in temperature, and it appears that the majority of the blame must rest upon its shoulders. Regional extinctions in the North Atlantic can be attributed to increased deep-sea anoxia, which could be due to the slowdown of overturning ocean currents,[12] or the release and rapid oxidation of large amounts of methane.[20][verification needed]

    In shallower waters, it's undeniable that increased CO2 levels result in a decreased oceanic pH, which has a profound negative effect on corals.[21] Experiments suggest it is also very harmful to calcifying plankton.[22] However, the strong acids used to simulate the natural increase in acidity which would result from elevated CO2 concentrations may have given misleading results, and the most recent evidence is that coccolithophores (E. huxleyi at least) become more, not less, calcified and abundant in acidic waters.[23] Interestingly, no change in the distribution of calcareous nanoplankton such as the coccolithophores can be attributed to acidification during the PETM.[23] Acidification did lead to an abundance of heavily calcified algae[24] and weakly calcified forams.[25]

    The increase in mammalian abundance is intriguing. There is no evidence of any increased extinction rate among the terrestrial biota. Increased CO2 levels may have promoted dwarfing[26] – which may (perhaps?) have encouraged speciation. Many major mammalian orders – including the Artiodactyla, horses, and primates – appeared and spread across the globe 13,000 to 22,000 years after the initiation of the PETM.[26]




    Paleocene


    CO2 Science

    SpringerLink - Coral Reefs, Volume 16, Number 4

    http://pdf.wri.org/factsheets/factsheet_reefs_main.pdf



    'Coral Reefs Expand As the Oceans Warm': Peer-reviewed paper in the journal Geophysical Research Letters finds warming oceans expand the range of tropical corals northward' | Climate Depot
     

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