Will Academia defend this? And if so for how long...

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by no1tovote4, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    On 9/12/2001 this "Professor" (and I use the term loosely) wrote an essay that he published that said that the victims of the WTC attacks were not victims and not innocent. He said that because they worked for US corporations they were "little Eichmanns" (talking about Adolf Eichmann who headed the program to extinguish the lives of all Jews for Hitler).

    Here is his essay:
    http://cleveland.indymedia.org/news/2003/12/7342.php

    Some quotes from the essay:

    Notice particularly the use of "Holocaust" to describe our actions in 1991 in Iraq, then later "Eichmann" to describe basically anybody at all who works for a US corporation.

    Toady in the Denver Post there is this story:
    http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~53~2678527,00.html


    In my opinion this is defamation of the worst kind, insidious too. Most who read his paper never realized that since they too work for a US corporation they are included in this "Eichmann" comparison. Basically everybody in the US, to this person, are the moral equivalent of Adolf Eichmann.

    I went on line to reasearch this "Professor" and found that he constantly uses these Nazi comparisons and often appears to be offensive on purpose in order to bait Jewish people specifically.

    Now while we do have the 1st Amendment it does not cover defamation of character. Also should we have such repulsive humans teaching our kids? Let alone heading a department at one of our Universities?

    How long do you think that this person will be protected by Academia before they realize that some things are not and should not be protected.

    This particular article not only compares us all to Eichmann but it also cheers on the attacks as clearly, in his mind, the moral high ground belongs to the terrorists. Is it legal to promote murder? It is free speech?
     
  2. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    As these aprticular brands of professor become more and more visible, they tend to drift out of acedamia and into punditry, and once that happens, they are soon exposed as buffoons...seems that way to me anyway
     

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