'Why Study Philosophy'

Discussion in 'Philosophy' started by midcan5, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. midcan5
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    midcan5 liberal / progressive

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    Does studying Philosophy make you smarter or are you just smart? I don't mean in the test smarter either because I have found through a lifetime of a variety of jobs, military service, and managing people that intelligence is a complicated thing and some of the smartest people are really dumb when it comes to life and even work. In the end does the study make one a better citizen? If so then one can understand why conservatives often argue against knowledge as knowledge frees one from ideology.

    Philosophy and standardized test scores: causation or correlation?

    Link below came from article above.

    https://campuspress.yale.edu/shellykagan/files/2016/07/Why-Study-Philosophy-1fwj3ad.pdf

    "In November I realized that there was a major defect in my account of emotions that meant that I had to write a new book showing the primary role of fear, and how fear infects all the other emotions. So that's the most recent large change." Martha Nussbaum
     
  2. TyroneSlothrop
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    TyroneSlothrop Guru of Gadzook

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    If one combined a Philosophy Major with an Art Major ....one could "draw their own conclusions" expertly ...
     
  3. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    I think if you/I spelled out philosophy for the average person, then even they could get it.

    However not being very bright they would never appreciate philosophy or its importance.

    And then they would just fall back on their usual fallacies -- worshipping religion as science or worshipping science as religion.
     
  4. MikeK
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    MikeK Gold Member

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  5. MikeK
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    MikeK Gold Member

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    This is a valid observation but it doesn't apply only to conservatives. There are dimwits on both sides of the political divide.
     
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  6. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    Knowledge is simply data that we have evidence about.

    Without Philosophy there is no way to process knowledge and then you are no better off than a superstitious Religionist or worse a scientist who has made Science their Religion.
     
  7. PK1
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    PK1 Gold Member

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    Non-critical worshipping is NOT philosophy.
    Philosophy is the basis of science.
    Non-critical faith is the basis of religion, salted with confirmation bias for cultural variants.
     
  8. task0778
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    task0778 Silver Member Supporting Member

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    Not sure what you mean by 'non-critical', but philosophy is about more than just science. Philosophy also deals with the metaphysical side of existence, abstract studies of the nature of existence, meaning of life, spirituality and religion, and man's values, behavior, and beliefs. So, your personal brand of philosophy might be the foundation upon which you base your religious faith and worship. IMHO the two are connected, you actions are an extension of your philosophy.
     
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  9. PK1
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    PK1 Gold Member

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    True; philosophy has variants that study what "reality" may be.
    I prefer the approaches reflective of ontology, logic, and epistemology.
    In other words, if one makes a claim, it should not only be rational, but there should be some "objective" evidence associated with it.
    Obviously, science rules that domain, as well as ignosticism/agnosticism beyond the observable.
     
  10. midcan5
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    midcan5 liberal / progressive

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    One of my best threads. Lots of views and hopefully thinking. An interesting piece on two pragmatists:

    "What is it about philosophy that makes long dead philosophers interesting in a way that long dead physicists are not?" Fans of Einstein might object, but it’s an intriguing question and typical of their inviting style."

    "The crux of their dispute centered on how far to take pragmatism. Rorty thought that the things we believe to be true aren’t actually connected to reality: There is the stuff we say, and then there is the actual world, and never the twain shall meet. We agree on certain conventions in order to function, but we’ll never arrive at anything like truth. Putnam meanwhile held to the idea, as he wrote, that "there is a way to do justice to our sense that knowledge claims are responsible to reality." In other words, it was possible, as he saw it, to be a pragmatist without jettisoning truth altogether."

    A Marriage of Minds

    And what's it like. Interviews

    "I would say quite seriously, that I am a socialist in economics, a liberal in politics, and a conservative in culture." Daniel Bell
     

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