Why IS College so expensive?

Discussion in 'Education' started by G.T., Sep 1, 2010.

  1. G.T.
    Offline

    G.T. Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    47,497
    Thanks Received:
    7,573
    Trophy Points:
    1,830
    Location:
    out
    Ratings:
    +27,448
    :eusa_eh:
     
  2. RyzinEnagy
    Offline

    RyzinEnagy Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Messages:
    103
    Thanks Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +5
    Because they know that these days it's almost necessary to have a college degree (not everybody is an entrepreneur, in case someone wanted to respond with that), so it's easy to raise tuition knowing that students will still pay it.
     
  3. G.T.
    Offline

    G.T. Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    47,497
    Thanks Received:
    7,573
    Trophy Points:
    1,830
    Location:
    out
    Ratings:
    +27,448
    The Business of issuing College Degrees is becoming near Monopoly.
     
  4. VaYank5150
    Offline

    VaYank5150 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    11,779
    Thanks Received:
    1,047
    Trophy Points:
    138
    Location:
    Virginia
    Ratings:
    +1,055
    This sounds about right.
     
  5. kwc57
    Offline

    kwc57 BOHICA Obama

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    12,154
    Thanks Received:
    2,301
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Ratings:
    +2,788
    Hey, high quality equipment for the football teams isn't cheap.
     
  6. johnrocks
    Offline

    johnrocks Silver Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,919
    Thanks Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    West Monroe, La.
    Ratings:
    +279
    Follow the money, a couple generations ago, people worked themselves through college so it was kinda tough increasing costs to someone who got going at 3 AM to throw a paper route before class, now with guaranteed student loans, grants and bureaucrats needing to spend the last dime to get the budget increased next fiscal year...costs are spiraling, reminds me of healthcare in that respect.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  7. psikeyhackr
    Offline

    psikeyhackr VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    745
    Thanks Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings:
    +71
    People have to be properly trained to not understand astronomical trivia.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0wk4qG2mIg]YouTube - Harvard Graduates Explain Seasons[/ame]

    Isn't it summer in Australia when it is snowing in Boston?

    psik
     
  8. camcooh2
    Offline

    camcooh2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    91
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +12
    I believe it has more to do with the American military and the volunteer army we have draped all over the world. A college degree is the best way to enter or stay in the middle class in America. By allowing college costs to constantly escalate at a rate of approximately 6% annually, it keeps college out of reach for millions of lower/lower middle class kids. These kids go into the service and are the "volunteer" army, as it's their only possible option. The military is happy because they have a steaky supply of new recruits. Middle class parents grudginly pay the exorbitant tuition/fee costs as the price of keeping junior out of the current war. Problem is, if we have a more immediate threat, say China, and we have to reinstitute the draft...all hell would break loose. But college costs would come down.
     
  9. Cecilie1200
    Offline

    Cecilie1200 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    26,879
    Thanks Received:
    3,720
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Ratings:
    +7,052
    Successful - even moderately successful - sports programs generally pay for themselves, and then some. If I remember correctly, the U of A's basketball and football teams not only pay for themselves entirely, they also help fund the less-watched sports programs.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  10. Cecilie1200
    Offline

    Cecilie1200 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    26,879
    Thanks Received:
    3,720
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Ratings:
    +7,052
    If you all think you can stand a response that's a bit more thoughtful and less agenda-driven - military spread? Really? - this is what I found when I did some cursory research.

    1) Half to two-thirds of the typical colleges budget goes to paying instructional salaries. So rising paychecks are indeed a factor in higher college costs.

    The median salary for a full-time college educator is $46,300, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The picture is brighter for those who have tenure: Full professors make an average $76,200, according to the American Association of University Professors.

    The tenure system and the lack of mandatory retirement can make it tough to oust high-earning but less productive employees.

    2) Colleges that want good rankings with U.S. News & World Reports annual college rankings and other college-rating programs shell out big bucks on ubiquitous high-speed Internet access, bigger and better dining facilities, new gyms and concert halls, apartments instead of dorms for students.

    While a lot of this spending is funded by endowments, a lot of it isn't.

    3) One factor that keeps inflation muted in the private sector is worker productivity. Technology, equipment and experience tend to help the average worker make widgets faster over time. That growing productivity allows a business to create more products for the same cost.

    But colleges arent in the business of making widgets. Those that try to force greater productivity out of their professors -- by increasing class sizes or class loads -- often find their strategies backfire. The best instructors leave for better environments, and the colleges reputations suffer among students and the ranking services that gauge university quality.

    Theres actually pressure for colleges to be less productive: to shrink class sizes and reduce class loads so professors can spend more time doing research.

    4) Scholarships, grants and loans reduce the out-of-pocket cost for the majority of students. (Loans just put off the pain, of course, but few students really think about how much the borrowing is going to cost them in the long run.)

    As weve seen with the health-care system, if people arent feeling the real cost of their purchases, they have less incentive to change their behavior. If youre paying the full tab and Elite University jacks up its rates 10%, you might opt for Just Fine State. If enough others followed your lead, Elite might rethink its pricing.

    As it stands, however, Elite just needs to boost your financial aid package by 8% or so, and you'll grumble but stay put.

    5) For two decades ending in 1997, the number of college-age people actually declined. The percentage of this shrinking group that actually attended college, however, shot up: from 47% of high school graduates in 1973 to 65% in 1996. That meant the number of people attending college in the 1990s remained pretty stable.

    Now the under-25 set is again on the rise. The number of college-age people is expected to grow from 17.5 million in 1997 to 21.2 million by 2010. The percentage actually attending college is bound to increase further, as fewer and fewer decent jobs remain for those with just a high school education.

    Meanwhile, the most selective schools havent expanded that much, even as the number of qualified applicants keeps rising. Thats why the SAT scores that would have gotten you into Harvard a decade ago might not get you accepted at your safety school today.

    Many other schools have shelved expansion plans -- either because they are state schools with shrinking legislative appropriations or because their endowment funds and giving programs took a hit along with the economy. An economic rebound could reverse that trend, but right now the good colleges have far more applicants than theyve got room.

    With that kind of demand, college and universities can continue to boost prices almost at will. (Thanks to MSNMoney)
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1

Share This Page