why czechs dont speak german, how soon Will Belarusian do the same with mongol juchi language (Musco

Discussion in 'History' started by Litwin, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. Litwin
    Offline

    Litwin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Messages:
    3,100
    Thanks Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    95
    Location:
    GDL&Sweden
    Ratings:
    +685
    how soon Will Belarusians do the same with mongol juchi language (Muscovite ) . yes, i know that situation with Belarus language in Belarus is much better than czechs have had 100 years ago. but still how soon Will Belarusian do the same with mongol juchi language (Muscovite )

    "The act of building puppets has long been a form of protest for the Czech people. Seventeenth-Century wood-carvers, who were more versed in sculpting Baroque seats for churches than human facsimiles, started making puppets for the actors of Bohemia soon after Ferdinand II came to power, as puppets were the only remaining entities that had the right to speak Czech in public places. While the rest of the country and its people adhered to the newly imposed German language, wandering actors and puppet-masters spoke through the puppets in their native Slavic tongue.

    It might seem unlikely that a few hundred puppets and puppet-masters could safeguard a language, especially through a loophole, but the people’s last remaining legacy to their past was tied to the puppet’s strings." Why Czechs don’t speak German
     
  2. Toro
    Offline

    Toro Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Messages:
    67,865
    Thanks Received:
    13,560
    Trophy Points:
    2,180
    Location:
    Surfing the Oceans of Liquidity
    Ratings:
    +49,259
    I don't even know what state Belarussia is in.
     
  3. José
    Offline

    José Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,527
    Thanks Received:
    342
    Trophy Points:
    180
    Ratings:
    +499
    He seems to be a guy originally from Ukraine or one of the Baltic States who holds a grudge against Russia...
     
  4. José
    Offline

    José Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,527
    Thanks Received:
    342
    Trophy Points:
    180
    Ratings:
    +499
    Belarussia in latin languages sounds more or less like "beautiful russian woman".

    30 Belarussias for me, please!! :113:
     
  5. Litwin
    Offline

    Litwin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Messages:
    3,100
    Thanks Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    95
    Location:
    GDL&Sweden
    Ratings:
    +685




    song in Belarusian

     
  6. Litwin
    Offline

    Litwin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Messages:
    3,100
    Thanks Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    95
    Location:
    GDL&Sweden
    Ratings:
    +685
    In 19th century the Russian Empire strove to replace[citation needed] the Ukrainian, Polish, Lithuanian, and Belarusian languages and dialects by Russian in those areas, which were annexed by the Russian Empire after the Partitions of Poland (1772–1795) and the Congress of Vienna (1815). Imperial Russia faced a crucial critical cultural situation by 1815:
    ....
    there more literate Poles than Russians, more people within it could read and write Polish than Russian. The third largest city, Wilno, was entirely Polish in character and its university was the best in the Empire.[11]

    Russification in Congress Poland intensified after the November Uprising of 1831, and in particular after the January Uprising of 1863.[12] In 1864 the Polish and Belarusian languages were banned in public places; in the 1880s Polish was banned in schools, on school grounds and in the offices of Congress Poland. Research and teaching of the Polish language, of Polish history or of Catholicism were forbidden. Illiteracy rose as Poles refused to learn Russian. Students were beaten for resisting Russification.[13] ...
    Starting in the 1840s Russia considered introducing Cyrillic script for spelling the Polish language, with the first school books printed in the 1860s; these attempts failed.[15

    ....

    A similar development took place in Lithuania.[12] Its Governor General, Mikhail Muravyov (in office 1863-1865), prohibited the public use of spoken Polish and Lithuanian and closed Polish and Lithuanian schools; teachers from other parts of Russia who did not speak these languages were moved in to teach pupils. Muravyov also banned the use of Latin and Gothic scripts in publishing. He was reported as saying, "What the Russian bayonet didn't accomplish, the Russian school will." .... This ban, lifted only in 1904, was disregarded by the Knygnešiai, the Lithuanian book smugglers, who brought Lithuanian publications printed in the Latin alphabet, the historic orthography of the Lithuanian language, from Lithuania Minor (part of East Prussia) and from the United States into the Lithuanian-speaking areas of Imperial Russia. The knygnešiai came to symbolise the resistance of Lithuanians against Russification.

    The Russification campaign also promoted the Russian Orthodox faith over Catholicism. The measures used included closing down Catholic monasteries, officially banning the building of new churches and giving many of the old ones to the Russian Orthodox church, banning Catholic schools and establishing state schools which taught only the Orthodox religion, requiring Catholic priests to preach only officially approved sermons, requiring that Catholics who married members of the Orthodox church convert, requiring Catholic nobles to pay an additional tax in the amount of 10% of their profits, limiting the amount of land a Catholic peasant could own, and switching from the Gregorian calendar (used by Catholics) to the Julian one (used by members of the Orthodox church).

    Most of the Orthodox Church property in the 19th century Congress Poland was acquired at the expense of the Catholic Church of both rites (Roman and Greek Catholic).[16]

    After the uprising,[which?] many manors and great chunks of land were confiscated from nobles of Polish and Lithuanian descent who were accused of helping the uprising; these properties were later given or sold to Russian nobles. Villages where supporters of the uprising lived were repopulated by ethnic Russians. Vilnius University, where the language of instruction had been Polish rather than Russian, closed in 1832. Lithuanians and Poles were banned from holding any public jobs (including professional positions, such as teachers and doctors) in Lithuania; this forced educated Lithuanians to move to other parts of the Russian Empire. The old legal code was dismantled and a new one based on the Russian code and written in the Russian language was enacted; Russian became the only administrative and juridical language in the area. Most of these actions ended at the beginning of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905, but others took longer to be reversed; Vilnius University re-opened only after Russia had lost control of the city in 1919.
    Ukraine

    Russian and Soviet authorities conducted policies of Russification of Ukraine from 1709 to 1991, interrupted by the Korenizatsiya policy in the 1920s. Since then, the Ukrainian government has implemented policies in order to decrease the use of Russian and favour Ukrainian, a process labelled Ukrainization.

    A number of Ukrainian activists committed suicide in protest against Russification, among whom are Oleksa Hirnyk and Vasyl Makukh.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russification
     
  7. Litwin
    Offline

    Litwin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Messages:
    3,100
    Thanks Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    95
    Location:
    GDL&Sweden
    Ratings:
    +685

    are you sure that you can handle it? , latent muslim ...

     
    • Funny and Agree!! Funny and Agree!! x 1

Share This Page