Vouchers for Vets?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by AmyNation, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. AmyNation
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    AmyNation Road Warrior Supporting Member

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    Mitt Romney Floats

    I'm torn. I like the idea of free market competition, however I'd worry about vouchers not being enough to cover health costs.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Seawytch
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    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

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    My thoughts are "no fucking way".

    That would increase costs a hell of a lot more than the $200 a year increase proposed elsewhere.
     
  3. AmyNation
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    AmyNation Road Warrior Supporting Member

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    How would allowing vets to buy private health insurance increase costs?
     
  4. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

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    Right now many procedures are simply not covered by Tricare until the vet is over a certain age. Just saw a Marine that needed his knee replaced and it was not covered, instead cause he wasn't 50 yet they put pins and bars in it.
     
  5. tjvh
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    tjvh Senior Member

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    By that logic, if I said "Hell fuckin' yeah" it would decrease costs (with no explanation given) then that would be OK too. :lol:
     
  6. AmyNation
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    AmyNation Road Warrior Supporting Member

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    I'm not the biggest fan of tricare, it doesn't cover a lot of things. Not that I'm complaining, unlike my private insurance we don't pay anything out of pocket for tricare.
     
  7. Seawytch
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    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

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    Prime or Standard?
     
  8. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    This is a solution in search of a problem.

    Not only does the Veterans Health Administration score better on quality measures than virtually any other area of the American health care system (RAND, CBO), it rates considerably higher in patient satisfaction than do other payers or providers. In 2010, the VHA had an American Consumer Satisfaction Index score of 85 for inpatients at VA medical centers and 82 for outpatients at VA clinics. Hospitals nationwide had a rating of 73 that year and health insurance also had a rating of 73 (the highest scoring individual big name insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, scored a 70).

    Regarding their costs, that CBO report cites research showing that "if the federal government had tried to buy from providers in the private sector the same array of services and products delivered to veterans by the VHA in 1999, the cost to taxpayers would have been $3 billion more in that year. (That higher cost represents an increase of about 17 percent over VHA’s total budget of $18 billion for that year.)"

    Indeed, the VHA's cost growth has been relatively tame compared to the rest of the health system:

    For comparison, private insurance premiums grew by an average of more than 9 percent per year over that 8-year period (and national health expenditures grew by more than 7 percent per year).

    So to sum up: the VHA is associated with higher quality, higher customer satisfaction scores, and lower cost growth than the rest of the American health sector. They also remain ahead of the game on factors like care integration and use of electronic health records.

    Privatization would be an ideological move, there's not much of a pragmatic case for doing so.
     
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