The Younger Generation

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Foxfyre, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    It is amazing to think that today's newest generation to come of age can't imagine a world without color television, cell phones, personal computers, microwave ovens, or automatic dishwashers, washing machines, and dryers. Many of today's college students have never seen a vinyl record, much less owned one, have never used a pay phone, have never popped popcorn in a pan on the stove, can't imagine a world without satellites, GPS, or e-mail. They're bright, savvy, some wise beyond their years, but its amazing how different their lives are than were those who came of age just 50 to 60 years ago.

    And while I enjoy them immensely and count many among my personal friends, I think sometimes this new college generation is missing out on some perspectives of history, have some very wrong ideas about lives their parents and grandparents led

    I lifted this off an old friend's Facebook page, but can probably come up with a link if you absolutely insist:

    I hope there are others who find this phenomenon interesting. But if not. . . .
     
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  2. Jeremy
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    Jeremy TRANSFER!!!

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    Great post.

    My wife and I are "only" 31 but we love listening to our vinyl collection and the only way we make popcorn is on the stove top. Not because we are trying to be "retro" but because somethings just can't be improved with technology. They may be replaced, but not improved.
     
  3. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, there are some your age or maybe a bit older who have discovered their parents' old 45 rpm record collections and have enjoyed discovering the music of that era. Have been posting them on Gunny's 'Icky love songs' thread even. :)

    I guess it's true that old dogs can and are learning new tricks, but the same goes for the 'young-uns' who are learning some old dog tricks that are quite satisfying. :)
     
  4. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    Good post, Foxy.

    i think that's true about every generation and the ones that come before, too. humanity is in a constant state of flux; one generation has the knowledge of history and the tools from the previous generations, but still has the naive idea that they know what's better, which i think can be both a good and bad thing.

    that's about right. my grandpa's got a great record collection. the first record i ever listened to was Kind of Blue, and i've got the Dark Side of the Moon vinyl even though i don't have a player. :lol: one day, i will though
     
  5. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    You're probably right SEG. I've seen many who condemn the olden days (like the 50's) because of the negatives, and don't see the negatives in their own generation as being anywhere near as bad. Those from those 'olden days' acknowledge that of course there were negatives but don't see them as bad as the negatives of the current generation.

    I listen to some of the modern music and it is just unpleasant noise - I hear no melody, no styling, no music. I've often wondered if my parents found the music of my generation as distasteful?
     
  6. Metternich
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    Metternich Federalist Farmer

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    I'm 18.

    I love Dirty Harry, and bought a poster created by an outdoor artist (in Santa Monica) which reads "Make my day, punk." I have 31 of Clint Eastwood's movies, and love them all.

    I have four vinyls; one of Bob Marley, two of Ratatat (a new electronic band) and one by The Beatles. Me and all of my friends own their own record players. We love the quality that they provide and we all have at least a handful of vinyls put out by brand new bands.

    My girlfriend only writes in cursive, and can't write in anything else.

    My point is, our generation isn't as foreign as this article thinks we are. :)
     
  7. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Way to go Metternich. Do you see yourself as typical of your generation? Would many of your friends share your experience?
     
  8. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    i think every generations has its metaphorical cross to bear. look at the founding fathers. their positive contributions go with out saying. they were also flawed humans, many of them slave-owners.

    personally, as atrocious as that practice is, i don't use that to diminish their contributions, because i think people are largely a product of the society in which they live.

    i'm thinking about what it might be that my generation is doing, that, one-hundred years from now, my great-grandkids will think is bigoted, like the way people today perceive slavery or female dis-enfranchisement today.


    probably. :lol:

    i've seen those black-and-white videos of elvis twisting his leg or whatever, and all the girls screaming and passing out, and it's hard for me to believe that those moves used to be considered sexy/edgy.

    if there was one other time i could've come of age in, i think it'd be the sixtes/seventies when all that classic rock was coming out. there's still good music today, i just don't think you'll find it on the radio. that music is corporatized and distilled through focus groups so there's only a narrow band of styles with the broadest and most generic base of listeners; the aesthetics in that mainstream music just don't do it for me.
     
  9. Mr Clean
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    Mr Clean Gold Member

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    I grew up in the '50s and '60s. I remember my parents referring to rock and roll as "jungle music".
     
  10. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    The instant gratification generation?
     

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