The Rightous Japanese

Discussion in 'Israel and Palestine' started by fairandbalanced, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. fairandbalanced
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    fairandbalanced VIP Member

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    Most Americans know of Oskar Schindler, the German businessman who saved more than 1,200 lives during the Holocaust by hiring Jews to work in his factories and fought Nazi efforts to remove them.

    But fewer know about Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese diplomat who disobeyed his government's orders and issued visas that allowed 6,000 Jews to escape from Nazi-occupied territories via Japan.

    On Sunday, as Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors observe International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a growing and widespread community of Jews -- linked by their gratitude toward Sugihara for saving them or family members -- remembers a man once forgotten.

    "Without him, many of the most accomplished minds of our world would not exist today. His legacy produced doctors, bankers, lawyers, authors, politicians, even the first Orthodox Jewish Rhodes Scholar," said Richard Salomon, a board member of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center. The museum holds artifacts from Sugihara as part of its permanent collection, and will honor him on Sunday along with others who saved Jews during the Holocaust.

    Salomon's father, Bernard, received the 299th visa issued by Sugihara, who in 1940 became the Japanese consul general to Lithuania, an area where Polish Jewish refugees had relocated during World War II. As Nazis threatened to invade Lithuania, thousands of Jews surrounded the Japanese consulate and asked for visas to escape. Disobeying his bosses in Japan, Sugihara issued thousands. From July 31 to Aug. 28, 1940, Sugihara and his wife stayed up all night, writing visas.

    The Japanese government closed the consulate, located in Kovno. But even as Sugihara's train was about to leave the city, he kept writing visas from his open window. When the train began moving, he gave the visa stamp to a refugee to continue the job.

    The refugees typically followed a route that took them via train to Moscow, then via the trans-Siberian railroad to Vladivostok and on to Kobe, Japan. Most stayed in Kobe for a few months, then went to Shanghai, China, and elsewhere. Salomon's father went from Shanghai to India and eventually settled in the U.S, where he met his wife Marian in Chicago.




    Meanwhile, Sugihara was transferred to Prague, where he worked in 1941 and 1942, and then to Bucharest, where he worked from 1942 to 1944. When the Soviets invaded Romania, he and his family were taken to a prison camp for 18 months. They returned to Japan in 1946, and a year later, the foreign office told him to resign. Years later, his wife, Yukiko Sugihara, who died in 2008, speculated the forced resignation was because of the unauthorized visas.

    Chiune Sugihara, who worked odd jobs after returning to Japan and later was employed by a trading company in Russia, worked in obscurity and never spoke of the visas. He never knew if anything came of them and survivors had no luck finding him. But in 1968, a survivor who had become an Israeli diplomat, Joshua Nishri, finally made contact. In 1985, a year before his death in Tokyo, Israel named Sugihara "Righteous Among the Nations," a title given to non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.

    "There are so many people living today because he took the time and made the effort. It was not easy and it was not a matter of sitting down and saying, 'Here, I'll write you this,'" said Anne Akabori, an author who translated "Visas for Life," Yukiko Sugihara's memoir, and wrote "The Gift of Life," an account of Chiune Sugihara's life.

    "And it's been so important for the Japanese people to know there was a person who did whatever he could to lessen the Japanese involvement in the war. He was always for peace," said Akabori, who was friends with the Sugiharas' son, Hiroki Sugihara, who died in 2001, and chairs the Visas for Life Foundation. The organization's mission is to "perpetuate the legacy" of Chiune Sugihara and connect "Sugihara survivors" and their descendents.

    The group has documented 2,139 Sugihara visas (many were for entire families). It's unknown exactly how many people can trace their ancestry to a Sugihara survivor, though Akabori's organization estimated it to be more than 100,000. More conservatively, the Simon Wiesenthal Center has estimated that 40,000 people are alive today because of the Sugiharas.

    Salomon's son, Mark Salomon, a 23-year-old law student at New York University, said knowing that his family would not have existed without Sugihara has ingrained a lifelong lesson in him about the "power of an individual."

    "Most people have this idea that you can't really help the whole world, so what's the point?" said Mark Salomon. But Sugihara showed that "whatever you are doing with yourself, you are having a much broader impact. Sometimes it's hard to see the forest through the trees, but it's important in every aspect of your life to remember you are having an effect and to make it a positive effect."
     
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  2. eflatminor
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    eflatminor Classical Liberal

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    Shouldn't your title be "a" righteous Japanese? You're talking about one guy's actions during a period in which the Japanese government committed some of the most horrific atrocities in the history of warfare...not to mention the dumb ass move of attacking America.

    Good on Sugihara. That doesn't make the Japanese under their emperor righteous.
     
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  3. MHunterB
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    MHunterB Gold Member

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    True, and let's hope that Chiune Sugihara wasn't the only righteous person among the Japanese - which would make him 'the' righteous Japanese.

    He was indeed a righteous man ad his lifesaving acts of kindness should not be forgotten. Thank you for reminding us : ))
     
  4. fairandbalanced
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    fairandbalanced VIP Member

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    To be honest, I typed "A Righteous Jap" first, but quickly erased & changed it (due to its offensive meaning) and retyped a new one (so quickly that I missed an E in the word righteous)

    eye sorrie.
     
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  5. eflatminor
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    eflatminor Classical Liberal

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    Okay.

    While I don't want to get off topic, and I did appreciate your OP, I have to comment on the use of the word "Jap".

    As you state, it's considered offensive, but why? It's nothing more than an abbreviation! I mean, nobody cares if I call British person a Brit or a Jewish person a Jew. We have all kinds of non-offensive terms for a person of a certain nationality. My Dad referred to himself and his buddies 'Mics' all the time. My German mother was ALWAYS call a Kraut and when I lived overseas, EVERYBODY called me a 'Yank'. Nobody was offended...but we can't say Jap. Why is that?
     
  6. sealadaigh
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    sealadaigh BANNED

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    jews call thermselves "jews", brits call themselves "brits" i have never heard a japanese person refer to themselves as a "jap".

    it is up to the person towards whom the term is directed to determine the offense.

    generally.
     
  7. MHunterB
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    MHunterB Gold Member

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    Interesting, seal. I've never heard a Jewish person make any reference to 'chosen' - so when someone refers to me that way for being Jewish, I suspect that they are NOT unprejudiced.

    And so far, it's been the case that such individuals were either seeking to be hurtful, or suffering from a very profound level of ignorance.......
     
  8. fairandbalanced
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    fairandbalanced VIP Member

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    Well, blacks refer to their fellow blacks by the N word, but you try to call them that and see wether the word's offensive or not.
     
  9. sealadaigh
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    sealadaigh BANNED

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    perhaps you should consider other reasons.

    for instance, when a jewish person calls a gentile person goy ot gentile people goyim, which many gentiles, myself included, find to be an offensive slur, and then, when you object to those hebrew words, the jewish person proceeds to explain how it is not a slur at all because it is in the bible etc...well...sometimes to "give some, get some" rule kicks in. god's "chosen people" is also certainly biblical in origin as well.

    perhaps, instead of thinking it as a hurtful or an ignorant term, which in many cases it, indeed, is, you should view it as a teachable/learning moment.

    also, some jewish people, not unlike some gentile people, do tend to act superior, or "chosen" so to speak, and think that referring to other posters as "stupid islamo-nazi cocksuckers" (and occasionally using an ethnic slur) or ramble on endlessly and with no substance at all to their ramblings about muslim and arab beasts and animals with baby brain destroying nail bombs and the like. i think, perhaps acknowledging their self concept of "chosen-ness" is not at all inappropriate.
     
  10. sealadaigh
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    i've worked a lot among people of many races and have been pretty thoroughly accepted by other people, to include those in the black community.

    i had a friend, DJ who would get to preachin' on breaks sometimes and i usually was the only white kid privy to these conversational displays. anyway, "******" would start flying around a lot and i told the participants "hey, don't use that word in front of me." then, some further discussion ensued where there was the conclusion reached that "hey, seal wasn't born with no silver spoon in his mouth either".

    after awhile, they stopped using the word.

    lol...maybe it was cuz i could relate to red kool aid.
     

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