The O.J. trial taught us one thing, we are still a racially divided nation.

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by nycflasher, Jun 14, 2004.

  1. nycflasher
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    nycflasher Active Member

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    "....Minutes after the verdict was announced, we learned something disheartening: The chasm between whites and blacks in this country was more pronounced than anyone imagined. As TV stations started showing various reactions to the verdict around the country, those images confirmed everything we refused to believe for 15 months. The defense was right. This trial wasn't about a double-murder, it was about a distressing racial divide, a legacy of mistrust between blacks and whites.

    The O.J. trial taught us one thing, we are still a racially divided nation.

    At the time, many African-Americans had trouble trusting police, lawyers, the legal process as a whole ... too many of their own people had been railroaded or mistreated over the years, personified by the revolting images from the Rodney King beating and the subsequent acquittal of the policemen involved. These scars affected every facet of Simpson's defense: the jury selection, the defense, even the verdict. When the system acquitted a clearly culpable man, some of these same African-Americans rejoiced upon hearing the news. One of their own had finally beaten the system. Didn't matter how.

    And yes, some blacks believed O.J. was guilty, just like some whites believed he was innocent. But those weren't the images that television chose to show us. And that remains the legacy of the trial, that astonishing moment when the verdict was announced -- My God, he's going to walk -- followed by many blacks celebrating like they won the Super Bowl, many whites recoiling in horror, O.J. and his team rejoicing, and saddest of all, Kim Goldman and her father sobbing uncontrollably. Ten years later, that image of the Goldmans endures over everything else, a sobering reminder of two brutal murders, of the mounds of evidence pointing to one man, of a trial that evolved into something else.

    Ten years later, we're still picking up the pieces. And if you can't remember what happened ... maybe you're lucky."more
     
  2. HGROKIT
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    HGROKIT Active Member

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    No, it taught us that the race card can still be counted on to over rule all common sense and overwhelming evidence.

    He did it. The murders had nothing to do with race, but his acquital did.

    Judge Ito will go down in history as the lamest judge ever. He lost control of the proceedings from day one.
     
  3. nycflasher
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    nycflasher Active Member

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    It also reminded us that we are still a racially divided nation.
    This time a black guy got off because he was rich and famous.
    And this made some people doubly pissed.
     
  4. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    It was clear that many blacks still hold a grudge against white people. I heard comments on the radio recently from black men calling in saying that they didnt really care about OJ and they even admitted that they think he probably did it. They just wanted a black guy to get off for something.

    Wheres the logic in that?
     
  5. brneyedgrl80
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    brneyedgrl80 Member

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    There is absolutely no point in it.

    The man was guilty as sin. :mad:
     
  6. Big D
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    Big D Guest

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    A grudge? Thats I nice way to put it.
     
  7. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    The races don't get along and never will. Our best bet is to move toward racial separation.
     
  8. nycflasher
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    nycflasher Active Member

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    That or just kill all the jews and blacks.:rolleyes:

    Don't be such a pussy, Joyce.
     
  9. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I have two problems with the premise of the original post.

    1)OJ Trial was almost a decade ago. How would it tell us anything about today?

    2)Ive seen no evidence of a racial divide between those who thought he was guilty and those who thought he wasnt. In fact almost everyone i know when the verdict was read was cheering simply because the justice system worked. the prosecution didnt prove its case. and until there is sufficienet evidence to prove it he is innocent. I just feel bad cause he got screwed over with the civil law suit despite the fact that he was found not guilty.
     
  10. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    World's a big place. We can all get along... far, far apart.
     

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