The facts on FRACKING

Discussion in 'Environment' started by skookerasbil, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    The Wall Street Journal puts to rest all the fiction on FRACKING promoted by the environmental kooks...............

    Hysterical stuff..........the total BS they come up with!!!


    • Fracking contaminates drinking water. One claim is that fracking creates cracks in rock formations that allow chemicals to leach into sources of fresh water. The problem with this argument is that the average shale formation is thousands of feet underground, while the average drinking well or aquifer is a few hundred feet deep. Separating the two is solid rock. This geological reality explains why EPA administrator Lisa Jackson, a determined enemy of fossil fuels, recently told Congress that there have been no "proven cases where the fracking process itself has affected water."

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    A drilling team from Minard Run Oil Company pull out steel pipe during a fracking operation at a 2100 foot natural gas well in Pleasant Valley, Pennsylvania in 2008.
    .A second charge, based on a Duke University study, claims that fracking has polluted drinking water with methane gas. Methane is naturally occurring and isn't by itself harmful in drinking water, though it can explode at high concentrations. Duke authors Rob Jackson and Avner Vengosh have written that their research shows "the average methane concentration to be 17 times higher in water wells located within a kilometer of active drilling sites."

    They failed to note that researchers sampled a mere 68 wells across Pennsylvania and New York—where more than 20,000 water wells are drilled annually. They had no baseline data and thus no way of knowing if methane concentrations were high prior to drilling. They also acknowledged that methane was detected in 85% of the wells they tested, regardless of drilling operations, and that they'd found no trace of fracking fluids in any wells.

    The Duke study did spotlight a long-known and more legitimate concern: the possibility of leaky well casings at the top of a drilling site, from which methane might migrate to water supplies. As the BP Gulf of Mexico spill attests, proper well construction and maintenance are major issues in any type of drilling, and they ought to be the focus of industry standards and attention. But the risks are not unique to fracking, which has provided no unusual evidence of contamination.

    • Fracking releases toxic or radioactive chemicals. The reality is that 99.5% of the fluid injected into fracture rock is water and sand. The chemicals range from the benign, such as citric acid (found in soda pop), to benzene. States like Wyoming and Pennsylvania require companies to publicly disclose their chemicals, Texas recently passed a similar law, and other states will follow.

    Drillers must dispose of fracking fluids, and environmentalists charge that disposal sites also endanger drinking water, or that drillers deliberately discharge radioactive wastewater into streams. The latter accusation inspired the EPA to require that Pennsylvania test for radioactivity. States already have strict rules designed to keep waste water from groundwater, including liners in waste pits, and drillers are subject to stiff penalties for violations. Pennsylvania's tests showed radioactivity at or below normal levels.

    • Fracking causes cancer. In Dish, Texas, Mayor Calvin Tillman caused a furor this year by announcing that he was quitting to move his sons away from "toxic" gases—such as cancer-causing benzene—from the town's 60 gas wells. State health officials investigated and determined that toxin levels in the majority of Dish residents were "similar to those measured in the general U.S. population." Residents with higher levels of benzene in their blood were smokers. (Cigarette smoke contains benzene.)

    • Fracking causes earthquakes. It is possible that the deep underground injection of fracking fluids might cause seismic activity. But the same can be said of geothermal energy exploration, or projects to sequester carbon dioxide underground. Given the ubiquity of fracking without seismic impact, the risks would seem to be remote.

    • Pollution from trucks. Drillers use trucks to haul sand, cement and fluids, and those certainly increase traffic congestion and pollution. We think the trade-off between these effects and economic development are for states and localities to judge, keeping in mind that externalities decrease as drillers become more efficient.

    • Shale exploration is unregulated. Environmentalists claim fracking was "exempted" in 2005 from the federal Safe Water Drinking Act, thanks to industry lobbying. In truth, all U.S. companies must abide by federal water laws, and what the greens are really saying is that fracking should be singled out for special and unprecedented EPA oversight.

    Most drilling operations—including fracking—have long been regulated by the states. Operators need permits to drill and are subject to inspections and reporting requirements. Many resource-rich states like Texas have detailed fracking rules, while states newer to drilling are developing these regulations.

    As a regulatory model, consider Pennsylvania. Recently departed Governor Ed Rendell is a Democrat, and as the shale boom progressed he worked with industry and regulators to develop a flexible regulatory environment that could keep pace with a rapidly growing industry. As questions arose about well casings, for instance, Pennsylvania imposed new casing and performance requirements. The state has also increased fees for processing shale permits, which has allowed it to hire more inspectors and permitting staff.

    New York, by contrast, has missed the shale play by imposing a moratorium on fracking. The new state Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman, recently sued the federal government to require an extensive environmental review of the entire Delaware River Basin. Meanwhile, the EPA is elbowing its way into the fracking debate, studying the impact on drinking water, animals and "environmental justice."


    Review & Outlook: The Facts About Fracking - WSJ.com








    Most fodder for the k00ks not winning............................:lol:


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    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  2. chikenwing
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    chikenwing Guest

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    New York is full of Idiots,the state is doing so well we don't need an economic gold mind like natural gas,and the huge amount of oil that's there also.!!

    By luck we are close enough to Pa,so we are getting some business from clients that are working the gas fields there.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing
    Stephen G. Osborna, Avner Vengoshb, Nathaniel R. Warnerb, and Robert B. Jacksona,b,c,1
    + Author Affiliations

    aCenter on Global Change, Nicholas School of the Environment,
    bDivision of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment, and
    cBiology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
    Edited* by William H. Schlesinger, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY, and approved April 14, 2011 (received for review January 13, 2011)

    Abstract
    Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dramatically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of northeastern Pennsylvania and upstate New York, we document systematic evidence for methane contamination of drinking water associated with shale-gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells within 1 km), average and maximum methane concentrations in drinking-water wells increased with proximity to the nearest gas well and were 19.2 and 64 mg CH4 L-1 (n = 26), a potential explosion hazard; in contrast, dissolved methane samples in neighboring nonextraction sites (no gas wells within 1 km) within similar geologic formations and hydrogeologic regimes averaged only 1.1 mg L-1 (P < 0.05; n = 34). Average &#948;13C-CH4 values of dissolved methane in shallow groundwater were significantly less negative for active than for nonactive sites (-37 ± 7&#8240; and -54 ± 11&#8240;, respectively; P < 0.0001). These &#948;13C-CH4 data, coupled with the ratios of methane-to-higher-chain hydrocarbons, and &#948;2H-CH4 values, are consistent with deeper thermogenic methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry from gas wells nearby. In contrast, lower-concentration samples from shallow groundwater at nonactive sites had isotopic signatures reflecting a more biogenic or mixed biogenic/thermogenic methane source. We found no evidence for contamination of drinking-water samples with deep saline brines or fracturing fluids. We conclude that greater stewardship, data, and&#8212;possibly&#8212;regulation are needed to ensure the sustainable future of shale-gas extraction and to improve public confidence in its use
     
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  4. Dont Taz Me Bro
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    Dont Taz Me Bro USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    The radical environmentalists won't be happy until we're all driving horses and buggies again, but that will just create a new problem as we will then find ourselves fending off PETA with bats and clubs.
     
  5. parkinson1963
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    parkinson1963 Rookie

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    benzene is benign?? WTF

    Just because a drinking water well only goes to a few hundred feet in depth does not mean the water also comes from a few hundred feet down, ever seen a flowing well.

    Fracking in certain conditions will cause new fractures to open up allowing methane to flow to the surface, not good if it is your well.
     
  6. RadiomanATL
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    RadiomanATL Senior Member

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    I don't need any information on fracking.

    I do quite well on my own, and have had no complaints thus far.
     
  7. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    LMAO...the k00ks are expert at putting out shit to scare the public.........but when you take a closer look and find out the particulars, you realize..........as usual.........its all a fcukking scam to promote a mentaql case agenda.


    We get drinking water from near the surface of the earth ( of course)..........FRACKING happens waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay beneath the surface of the earth.



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  8. tonystewart1
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    tonystewart1 VIP Member

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    Methane in well water is not a new thing. For 100s of years people have had their well contaminated with methane. You have to vent a well to stop it. I mean you are drilling a hole in the ground to get your water your bound to hit NG at some point. I remember when I was a kid you could light my grandmas kitchen faucet on fire when the vent was stopped up.
     
  9. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    LMAO..........you know what TS..............shit like that never happened to these k00ks when they were kids. Thats why they get fcukking hysterical about anything and everything out there. Ever hear the "thatched cottage" reference applied to liberals guys?? There ya go............

    Hey.........the #14 on a road course today bro!!! Just wish his practice times were better this weekend..........
     
  10. tonystewart1
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    tonystewart1 VIP Member

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    Yea you and me both. But he will eat up the road course no problem.
     

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