Swedish Economic Performance About the Same as America's

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Toro, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. Toro
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    Toro Diamond Member

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    I'm posting this for reference, because I am sure it will come in handy some time in the future.

    Some people here get the wrong impression that I am a liberal, or at least an economic liberal. I'm not. I have been a member or supporter of conservative parties in Canada and the UK, and used to regularly support the Republicans. My political hero is Margaret Thatcher, and I generally believe in free trade and less government involvement in the economy.

    This mistaken impression has come because I am often arguing with conservatives over basic facts. This p****** me off because I find myself defending policies in which I often don't believe nor support just to clarify factual mistakes people make to support their own worldview.

    For example, in this thread, I am being forced to defend the Swedish economy, a model I don't particularly support. I am going to re-post this so I can find it the next time I need it.

    You can see all the data here.

    1. Gross domestic product

    Real GDP growth on a purchasing power parity basis from 1970 to 2009 for the US was 3.6% v 2.9% for Sweden. From 1980 to 2009, it was 2.8% and 1.9% respectively. From 1990 to 2009, it was 2.6% and 1.8% respectively. This decade, it has been 2% and 1.7% respectively.

    America does better, right?

    Well, this is almost due entirely to population growth. Over the past 40 years, GDP growth per capita for the US has been 2.9% versus 2.8% for Sweden. Over the past 30 years, it has been 1.8% and 1.7% respectively. However, since 1990, per capita GDP has grown faster in Sweden at 1.7% versus 1.6% in the US. And this decade, Swedish real per capita GDP has risen by 2% compared to 1.2% in the US.​


    That doesn't mean I support all of Obama's policies, or that I think America should be like Sweden, or that we should have high taxes and a broad welfare system, or anything like that. It just means that people should look at basic facts and data rather than continuously spout trite bromides to reinforce their own beliefs.
     
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  2. william the wie
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    william the wie Gold Member

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    How much of that do you attribute to Sweden having its banking/housing crisis much earlier than the US?
     
  3. Sinatra
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    Sinatra Senior Member

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    You know NOTHING of economics boyo.

    You cannot compare a country roughly the size of New Jersey to the U.S. economy. (and New Jersey is more diverse to boot)

    Good Lord man, get a clue...
     
  4. Epsilon Delta
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    Epsilon Delta Jedi Master

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    I understand the feeling; this sort of thing usually happens to me in real life depending on who I'm talking to, in a variety of issues (i.e. if someone's being really extreme one way, I tend to pull towards the opposite way even though I generally agree with the point of view). Almost never happens on the board, but it happens a lot in real life. It just gets annoying.
     

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