Republicans in dilemma over "Religious Right"

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Stephanie, Nov 10, 2006.

  1. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    I think I should feel insulted....:rolleyes:
    This article is absolute crapolo...We better be prepared for a lot more crap articles like this.....
    Republicans in dilemma over "Religious Right"

    By Ed Stoddard

    DALLAS (Reuters) - Thumped in Tuesday's elections, the Republican Party faces a dilemma as it prepares for 2008: trying to claw back support in the center while keeping loyal conservative Christians happy.

    Religiously motivated social conservatives are an important base for base for President George W. Bush and the Republican Party, which lost control of both houses of Congress in the elections amid voter anger over corruption, intrusive government and the Iraq war.

    The Republicans tread a fine line between adopting hard-line stances on issues that resonate with conservative Christians, such as opposing abortion, while pleasing moderates who like the party's pro-business policies but not its religious moralizing.


    But politically active evangelicals -- dubbed the "Religious" or "Christian Right" -- and the Republican Party are caught in a bind as they rely too heavily on each other to split up.

    "Based on the exit polls it is clear that the evangelical vote did come out quite strongly for the Republicans," said Scott Keeter of the Pew Research Center.

    Based on exit polls he estimated that 72 percent of white evangelical Protestants voted Republican versus 74 percent in 2004. Democrats got only 27 percent of their vote versus 24 percent in 2004, Keeter said.
    "But the problem for the Republicans is that they lost the middle," he said -- meaning both religious and secular Americans with more lenient views on social issues.

    Evangelical leaders were also staunch supporters of the unpopular war in Iraq, which they see as part of a broader "clash of civilizations" or unfolding Biblical prophecy.

    I think if they want to be a viable party in two years the Republicans will need to clean house. The party would have to be purged (of the 'Christian Right')," said Mark Crispin Miller, an author and professor of culture and communication at New York University.:food1:

    But with almost three-quarters of white evangelicals voting Republican, the party would be hard pressed to dump its most loyal constituency -- one that is also well-organized and controls much of the party at the state level.

    And analysts say the Christian Right has no political option but the Republicans because it has demonized Democrats.

    SOUTHERN PARTY?


    Some analysts also say embracing policies associated with the "Bible Belt" of the South could make the Republicans a marginal regional party.

    "Right now the Republican Party is a southern party and if they are going to just be a southern party they are going to be a minority party," said David Bositis of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

    Still, the "Religious Right" remains a political force.

    "There's no doubt about it, they can still get voters to the polls and demonstrated that this year," said John Green, a political scientist at the University of Akron.

    Voters in seven states rejected gay wedlock by limiting marriage to between a man and a woman in ballot initiatives.
    That may have helped the Republicans win a tight Senate race in Tennessee against a popular black Democrat.

    But the limits of the "Religious Rights" influence was highlighted in South Dakota, where voters repealed a restrictive abortion law.

    Conservative talk radio hosts and prominent Republicans like Missouri Rep. Roy Blunt have said the party must heed its right wing if it wants to bounce back in 2008 when the White House will also be at stake.

    Such calls may scare off Republican moderates but religious activists have vowed to press on at the ballot box.


    "We are going to stay the course and stay focused on the defense of marriage, the defense of life (anti-abortion) and the defense of religious liberties," said Carrie Gordon Earll, spokesperson for Focus on the Family, an influential conservative advocacy group with strong evangelical ties.
    http://today.reuters.com/news/artic...-RIGHT.xml&WTmodLoc=Home-C2-TopNews-newsOne-1
     
  2. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    These people just dont get it do they?

    We dont need to be going to the center. Thats what caused us to lose. Republicans refused to govern as conservatives. They didnt keep the budget balanced. They didnt solve the immigration problem. They thought they could keep us busy with token ammendments to ban gay marriage (which we do want but we dont want them acting like its some token to us).

    We dont need to be moving to the center. we need to be moving to the right. Then the conservatives wont stay home next election.
     
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  3. musicman
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    musicman Senior Member

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    You're so right, Avatar. What makes the exit polling data so deceptive in this case is that it concerns people who were ACTUALLY THERE. What the pundits and politicians would like to ignore is that a significant number of conservatives voted with their middle fingers - from their homes.
     
  4. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah when you have mostly Democrats voting, then naturally the biggest problem they are going to have is the so called "corruption" of the Republicans. Seriously though what corruption was there?

    I mean look they said Tom Delay was corrupt. And what do they charge him with? A law that didnt exist when he supposedly engaged in this corruption.

    Or Weldon. The man submitted himself and the so called corrupt dealings to be looked into TWO YEARS AGO. He we cleared of everything, and suddenly the FBI begins a surprise raid on his daughter two weeks before an election.

    Or the so called Abrahamoff scandal in which more Democrats participated in than Republicans.

    Meanwhile Senator Reid has shady land deals and gets a promotion. William Jefferson gets defended. Seriously, Republicans should have come down hard on that guy.
     
  5. CivilLiberty
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    CivilLiberty Active Member

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    We don't agree on many things - but we agree on this.

    I didn't leave the Republican party - the Republican party left me.

    I see no conservative values in the party right now - it's absurd. The party is so busy politicizing highly polarized issues to attract specific demographic groups, it has lost its central core beliefs.


    CL
     
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  6. UnAmericanYOU
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    UnAmericanYOU VIP Member

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    Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, everytime to GOP loses a major election you get this from secularist "progressives", a call for all to go to the left just like them.

    "Trying to claw back to the center"? Why? Oh, yeah, to become politically viable and do it soon, or the left is afraid the Republican party will self-destruct. I thought that was their point.

    I agree, they're misreading this election, but Ed Stoddard doesn't have to worry, Bush will follow Pelosi's and Reid's leads, he is a lame duck now that is only going to try to repair his presidential legacy. To do that, Bush will agree to virtually anything the majority party puts in front of him, with the exceptions of Iraq and inditements of the executive branch.

    Purge? Radical left professors do have a thing for Uncle Joe, huh? Maybe McCain ought to line them up against the wall and shoot THEM, too.

    The unsolicited advice....win elections, go left, lose elections, go left, then we'd be indistinguishable from the Democrat party for real, just like we were perceived to be by the voters last week.

    Nah. Reagan conservatism renewal time, let's all pray.
     
  7. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    I second Avatar. I believe that the whole "Christian right" thing is a boogeyman. First, for as long as the GOP has been around and all through their years in power in Congress, they RARELY delivered on the issues that Christian conservatives cared about, like abortion. They always just sort of teased them along.

    Of course, I always wonder what would happen if the GOP started to explicitly address the concerns of white Americans, like immigration and affirmative action, maybe even going so far as to use the word "white." I just wonder...
     

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