Rep. Thomas Massie Condemns ‘Pay-to-Play’ Rules in Congress

Discussion in 'Congress' started by longknife, Jul 22, 2018.

  1. longknife
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    longknife Diamond Member

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    I’ve seen this report before but it gets buried under a rock for some reason. It’s totally disgusting and involves both parties.

    Massie explained that committee assignments in the House of Representatives are based on how much money GOP members can raise for the National Republican Congressional Committee and Democrats for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

    This requirement forces lawmakers to raise more money than they need for re-election campaigns in order to get committee assignments that cover issues of more specific concern to their districts. Among the results is that the desirability of committees becomes based on how much money lobbyists are likely to give to members of the respective panels.

    Can you believe this? Where is the Freedom Caucus on this?

    More of this disgusting story @ Rep. Thomas Massie Condemns 'Pay-to-Play' Rules in Congress
     
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  2. RoccoR
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    RoccoR Gold Member

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    Rep. Thomas Massie Condemns ‘Pay-to-Play’ Rules in Congress
    ※→ longknife, et al,

    I'm confused.

    I thought that the
    Federal & State Pay-to-Play were put in place to limit contributions.


    [COMMENT]

    Are we talking about the same thing? We all know that this falls into the realm of "ethics" and that your question of -- "Freedom Caucus on this?" -- is not really a fair question because the Honorable Members of Congress establish the standard and could not answer this question honestly.

    The legitimacy of the "Pay-to-Play Rules" is a matter of defining it in terms of the customary and normative environment of the Capitol. As I said before, if you've been to the Capitol Building, just walking down those marble hallways -- you can just sense the feeling of power. But when you examine your question on the "legitimacy" of the "Pay-to-Play" Rules you cannot overlook the implication of "institutional corruption." If it is wrong, how did it escape the notice of 535 voting Members of Congress) and become a rule, slipping paste all of them and becoming a very complicated issue? The only way it could be done is that is became an institutional regime. And can we say that the Congress is a law unto itself --- for the sake of legitimacy?

    Most Respectfully,
    R
     
  3. BlackFlag
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    BlackFlag I haz hoisted it!

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    Where’s the Freedom Caucus on this? They’re where whoever pays them wants them to be
     
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  4. Dan Stubbs
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    Dan Stubbs FORGET ---- HELL Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    You really want a peek into who in the that Body of the Nation go to your search and type in the name of Alce Hastins and hold your head on. Hear is just a small sample: First African-American judge appointed to Florida (appointed by Jimmy Carter to the Southern District of Florida in 1979), Hastings was impeached and removed from office in 1989 -- two counts, perjury and conspiracy to obstruct justice, one of only twelve judges in American history to be afforded this indignity. The basis of the two charges was his lying about the fixing of cases in his court. However, even after impeachment he is the first African-American to be elected to Congress from Florida since the Reconstruction, representing Dade and Broward Counties, and several others. He is a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
     

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