Military Cross for Kate!

Discussion in 'Europe' started by Bootneck, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. Bootneck
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    Bootneck Diamond Member

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    Kate Nesbitt is the first woman in the Royal Navy to be awarded the Military Cross for outstanding gallantry. She was serving as a front line medic with 3 Commando Brigade on our winter deployment in Afghanistan.

    We are proud of you, Kate. Well done! We thank you and all the other medics who risk their lives to save ours.


     
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  2. Big Black Dog
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    Big Black Dog Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Congratulations and "Thank You" to this hero. Once, years ago, when I visited Lord Nelson's flagship moored at Portsmouth, I remember reading a phrase that simply stated "England expects that every man do his duty." This fine lady has certainly done that and more. I hope she is as proud of herself as England is proud of her.
     
  3. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    it always amazes me what people do when push comes to shove...

    good on katie
     
  4. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Which is exactly why we need to stop "rescuing" people from having to resort to using their own strengths.
     
  5. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Huh?
     
  6. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    People are capable of tremendous acts of strength courage and stamina "when push comes to shove". Why do we bail them out before they get there ?
     
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  7. Colin
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    Colin Gold Member

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    It is good to see our women at war being recognised for the courage they show on the front line. She does us all credit. But so do you all, son. We are proud of all of you who serve your country with courage, honour and dedication. May you all be blessed with good fortune in the months ahead.
     
  8. tigerbob
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    tigerbob Increasingly jaded.

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    I never saw this thread when it was originally posted. Thanks Mr Fitnah for the link.

    I've always thought that those who serve on the front line in a non combatant role are deserving of the highest praise.

    I remember reading a story about a guy who was a conscientious objector during WW1. "Consciey" is often a somewhat derogatory term for those who don't have the courage to go into battle and who choose to explain their decision by saying it is a moral choice. For some that may be true, for many it is a get out of jail free card.

    This guy in WW1, and many others like him apparently, while feeling unable to kill anyone, was still willing to do his part for his country, going out into no mans land to tend to those who had been wounded, or loading them onto stretchers and carrying them back to their own lines, often under heavy fire.

    Can you imagine how much bravery it must take to be carrying someone on a stretcher through and over mountains of razor wire? You're completely unable to defend yourself, barely able to take cover, little more than a sitting duck. Shells and mortars don't distinguish between combatants and non combatants.

    As the OP suggests, very little seems to have changed in this respect over the last 100 years. With of course the exception that in WW1 there was perhaps a code of honor for some combatants that stated you should not knowingly fire on medical personnel. I very much doubt that the Taliban operate with anything even approaching the same restraint.

    Hats off to Kate Nesbitt, and all those like her.
     
  9. tigerbob
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    tigerbob Increasingly jaded.

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    I visited HMS Victory 2 years ago just before leaving England. I'd never seen her and thought that this was something the kids should see before we left to live in America. On board, they were selling rectangular engraved plates with that message on. I bought one and it now hangs in my workshop.

    I'm looking at it as I type. It was Nelson's signal to the fleet before engaging Napoleon's fleet (French and Spanish) off Cape Trafalgar, October 21, 1805. The British Fleet were outnumbered, but were considered at the time to be the greatest and best disciplined naval force in the world. The signal of course was with flags.

    [​IMG]

    The battle started in the early morning and, just after noon, Nelson was shot through the lungs by a sniper from the yards of a French ship of the line. He died about 3 hours later by which time the battle had been won. He thus became (along with Marlborough and Wellington), one of the best known of all British military heroes from the "golden age" of the empire. As such, I would imagine that there are very few Englishmen of my generation who, 200 years later, do not know word for word what the signal said, who sent it and what it signified.

    Unless, I'm mistaken, HMS Victory is still in service, though in an honorary sense, as the flagship of one of the Sea Lords.
     

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