Miami columnist gets it right on the nose

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by Ravi, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    First, it won't stop undocumented immigrants from coming to the United States. As long as the U.S. per capita income is more than three times higher than Mexico's -- $46,400 vs. $13,500, to be precise -- Mexicans and other Latin Americans will continue crossing the border one way or another.

    Barring a greater economic integration that could benefit both the United States and its neighbors, nothing will stop Mexicans and other Latin Americans from seeking a better life if they can't support their families in their own country.
    Second, it will not make Arizona safer. On the contrary, it will divert police resources away from fighting crime and will compel undocumented immigrants -- as well as U.S.-born Hispanics who won't want to be hassled by police -- not to report crimes.

    CONSEQUENCES PILE UP
    The current Arizona anti-immigration hysteria was partly sparked by the killing of a rancher near the Mexican border last month. The anti-immigration law's supporters say the killing was carried out by an undocumented migrant, and that they want to prevent similar crimes.
    But the Arizona Police Chiefs Association and others opposed the measure, saying it will drain law enforcement resources and prevent witnesses from stepping forward. By the same token, U.S. authorities in 2007 publicly honored 26-year-old undocumented immigrant Manuel Jesus Cordova for rescuing a 9-year-old whose mother had died in an accident. Would Cordova do so under the new law?
    Third, it will hurt Arizona's economy. The new law is likely to be struck down by the courts as unconstitutional, but only after long and costly legal battles.

    In addition, a flight of many of the estimated 470,000 undocumented Latinos from Arizona and the closing of some of the more than 35,000 Hispanic-owned businesses in the state will drain the state's already ailing finances.
    If Latinos leave, ``they will take their tax dollars, businesses and purchasing power with them.'' These are higher than the cost of state services they use, the Immigration Policy Center advocacy group says.

    Fourth, if more U.S. states follow Arizona's lead, there may be a Latin American tourism backlash. Many of the more than 13 million Mexicans, 2.5 million South Americans and 860,000 Central Americans who travel to the United States every year may think twice before visiting a country where they may be stopped by police just because of the color of their skin or the language they speak.

    Fifth, and perhaps most important, the law is morally wrong and profoundly un-American. The United States, despite the decline of its international image immediately after the Iraq War, is once again being seen positively by a majority of countries, according to a BBC poll released last week. Racial profiling laws would no doubt hurt the U.S. image abroad.


    Arizona's anti-immigrant law will spark Hispanic exodus -- possibly to Miami - Andres Oppenheimer - MiamiHerald.com
     
  2. Truthmatters
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    Truthmatters BANNED

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    Its such a very bad law I think maybe it was just to get the national attention on the issue.

    Lets hope they werent really so stupid to think it was a good law.
     
  3. slackjawed
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    slackjawed Self deported

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    What the law is already doing is pushing our so-called leaders in Dc to take steps to deal with the problem, which they should have been doing, but haven't for several years.

    That actually was one of the arguments on the floor of the state assembly while it was being debated.
     
  4. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    I think the nation should give this law a chance. If something is not done soon, we are doomed to becoming a 3rd world country very, very soon. If you don't believe it, just look around you. Wake up! Everybody is supposing this and that will happen. They will say anything and do anything against doing what is the best for this country. NOBODY is saying get rid of IMMIGRANTS! What this law says is that if YOU don't come into this country LEGALLY (through the front door) you will no longer be welcomed. Now what is wrong with that????? If in some cases racial profiling is an issue, then we can take care of it when and IF it happens. But to start talking nonsense and getting 'hysterical' about what MIGHT be, is silly and foolish! Chill people, CHILL!!
     
  5. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    Chief Roberto VillaseƱor said officers will prepare to enforce the state's new immigration law.

    He cited obstacles the department must overcome, ranging from how to transport illegal immigrants they arrest to maintaining trust with people in the community who are concerned about racial profiling.

    The department also will have to train officers to enforce the law once guidelines are established by the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board, he said.

    VillaseƱor, who originally opposed the bill, said lack of resources won't prevent the department from enforcing the law. "Once it's passed, we're obligated to enforce it," he said.

    Tucson police reaction
     

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