Mexican Cross-border trucking rears it's ugly head...again.

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Missourian, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    I was doing some background research for a thread on the positive effects of Union influence on trucking when I came across the article quoted below.


    The Teamster, in conjunction with owner/operators and small fleet owners like myself, have long struggled to halt the implementation of the cross-border NAFTA requirement to allow Mexican trucks to operate in the U.S.

    The U.S. trucking heavyweights like Schneider National (the orange trucks), Swift Transportation and J.B. Hunt are lobbying in favor of allowing Mexican truck to cross the border, as they have already built terminals and acquired Mexican business licenses in Mexico.
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    From what I've read from Transportation Secretary Ray La Hood, I think Obama is going to cave:

    So the big trucking corporations get what they want, Mexican drivers driving their trucks at 1/3 American wage.

    Big Business gets what they want, cheaper transportation from their factories in Mexico.

    Mexico gets what they want, access to American truckload shipping to and from the U.S.

    And the American Consumer gets what they want, cheaper goods.

    The only ones that get screwed are American Workers and the driving public.

    Truckers obviously get the shaft in lower wages and less miles.

    Labor gets downsized and outsourced because the benefit of moving factories to Mexico increase.

    And the Driving Public gets tens of thousands of inferior Mexican Trucks and poorly trained Mexican drivers with limited English language skills.


    What are your thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2010
  2. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Yea aren't those Globalist trade deals just great? What a disgrace.
     
  3. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    NAFTA, the gift that keeps on giving. :doubt:
     
  4. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    Another recent article from TheTrucker.com:

    TheTrucker.com - America's Trucking Newspaper
     
  5. Trajan
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    Trajan conscientia mille testes

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    I think that being a capitalist and free market person as I am I have to say as much as it stinks, we signed an agreement. The big boys that can afford to have done as you stated above they found a way to turn lemons into lemonade, because they know it going to happen.

    I am wondering how much this will effect you, in Missouri? You said you are a small fleet, do you carry to Mexico or from Mexico? Will freight boarded in and delivered to areas you work take bus. away from you?
     
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  6. loosecannon
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    loosecannon Senior Member

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    Only that the last thing we need is to give the Mexican drug cartels a passport to our freeways.
     
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  7. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    No, this won't affect me directly, we are only a regional specialized carrier, but it will affect everyone in the industry indirectly...all the carriers that do carry freight to and from the Mexican border will quickly find themselves with no freight to haul.

    While the Mexican government has stopped subsidizing diesel fuel in Mexico as of the first of the year, Mexican diesel is still 12% cheaper than on-road diesel in the U.S., plus their diesel isn't dyed like American fuel (for tax purposes, U.S. diesel for over-the-road use is dyed...meaning the federal excise tax has been paid.)

    Add to that the reduced wages of Mexican drivers, an no U.S. trucking company can compete.

    Those units will join the competition for the already anorexic levels of interstate and intrastate freight. More trucks, less freight, more American jobs exported to Mexico.

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    This chart only covers the recession, it's the Truck Tonnage Index since Jan 2006.

     
  8. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    Already happening...NAFTA already allows Mexican trucks into the United States...un-inspected. There is a 20 mile "free trade zone" all along the Mexican border.
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    Truck traffic through Laredo has tripled since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) came into force 16 years ago. If customs inspectors examined every truck, it would cripple free trade. Instead, one out of every five trucks is unloaded and inspected. So drug traffickers play the numbers game.


    "They're probably thinking ... 'My truck is not gonna get examined. We're gonna go through Laredo to see if we can get through,'" Garza says.


    This fiscal year, more than 4.7 million commercial trucks crossed into the U.S. from Mexico. According to the Department of Homeland Security, agents seized 96 tons of marijuana from trucks at southwest ports of entry in 2010, more than twice as much as in 2006. Officials say tougher enforcement in the lonesome stretches between border towns is funneling more contraband through these busy border crossings.

     
  9. loosecannon
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    loosecannon Senior Member

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    No wonder the Mexicans are hot to trot for a free trade corridor that dissects the nation and opens up exploitation of the entire Interstate system.

    The second and third biggest industries in Mexico are drugs and human trafficking. The largest is oil which only needs pipelines for distribution.

    Do the math!
     
  10. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    According to U.S. federal law enforcement and Mexican security sources, drug mafias have thoroughly infiltrated Mexican export and trucking companies.


    Sometimes drivers are paid to haul dope that they know is hidden in their cargo. In 2010, Mexican truckers accounted for 78 percent of all security breaches to the U.S. customs' program that expedites cargo shipped by companies with pre-approved security plans. But sometimes the drivers are clueless.




    Drugs Cross Border By Truck, Free Trade And Chance : NPR
     

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