Mark Steyn: Young ‘Occupiers' share grandparents' assumptions

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Trajan, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. Trajan
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    Trajan conscientia mille testes

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    My take, using another great nation state is; the Roman Empire ( Rome) didn’t ‘fall’ because of the debasement of coinage, loss of battles or madness of its emperors, it ‘fell’ because it had lost its energy. It became complacent and took for granted that the Barbarians at the gates would be held off by the previously convinced ‘barbarians’ it had conquered and settled and it was so, until Romes 'identify and definition’ became such a hodge podge that ‘barbarians’ valued theirs more highly even after hundreds of years.




    The always interesting and brilliantly voluble My Steyn on greater social affairs…….just thought I’d share.

    have a good Monday;)

    Oct. 14, 2011 Updated: Oct. 15, 2011 7:59 a.m.
    Mark Steyn: Young ‘Occupiers' share grandparents' assumptions
    The agitators for "American Autumn" think that such demands are reasonable for no other reason than that they happen to have been born in America, and expectations that no other society in human history has ever expected are just part of their birthright.



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    In Britain, France, Spain and the Netherlands, the average citizen lives better than he ever did at the height of Empire. Today's Europeans enjoy more comfortable lives, have better health and take more vacations than their grandparents did. The state went into decline, but its subjects enjoyed immense upward mobility. Americans could be forgiven for concluding that, if this is "decline," bring it on.

    But it's not going to be like that for the United States: unlike Europe, geopolitical decline and mass downward mobility will go hand in hand.


    Indeed, they're already under way. Whenever the economy goes south, experts talk of the housing "bubble," the tech "bubble," the credit "bubble." But the real bubble is the 1950 "American moment," and our failure to understand that moments are not permanent. The United States emerged from the Second World War as the only industrial power with its factories intact and its cities not reduced to rubble, and assumed that that unprecedented pre-eminence would last forever: We would always be so far ahead and so flush with cash that we could do anything and spend anything, and we would still be No. 1. That was the thinking of Detroit's automakers when they figured they could afford to buy off the unions. The industrial powerhouse of 1950 is now a crime-ridden wasteland with a functioning literacy rate equivalent to West African basket-cases. And yes, Detroit is an outlier, but look at the assumptions its rulers made, and then wonder whether it will seem quite such an outlier in the future.


    Snip-

    Beneath the allegedly young idealism [of Occupy Wall Street] are very cobwebbed assumptions about societal permanence. The agitators for "American Autumn" think that such demands are reasonable for no other reason than that they happen to have been born in America, and expectations that no other society in human history has ever expected are just part of their birthright. But a society can live on the accumulated capital of a glorious inheritance only for so long. And, in that sense, this bloodless, insipid revolution is just a somewhat smellier front for the sclerotic status quo.


    Middle-class America is dying before our eyes: The job market is flat-lined, college fees soar ever upward, the property market is underwater, and ObamaCare is already making medical provision both more expensive and more restrictive. That doesn't leave much else—although no doubt, as soon as they find something else, the statists will fix that, too. As more and more middle Americans are beginning to notice, they lead more precarious and vulnerable lives than did their blue-collar parents and grandparents without the benefit of college "education" and health "benefits." For poorer Americans, the prospects are even glummer, augmented by ever-grimmer statistics on obesity, childhood diabetes and much else. Potentially, this is not decline, but a swift devastating downward slide, far beyond what post-war Britain and Europe saw and closer to Peronist Argentina on a Roman scale.

    It would be heartening if more presidential candidates understood the urgency. But there is a strange lack of boldness in most of their proposals. They, too, seem victims of that 1950 moment, and assumptions of its permanence.
    Much more at-

    Mark Steyn: Young ‘Occupiers’ think like their grandparents | decline, college, ever - Opinion - The Orange County Register
     
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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  2. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Mark Steyn does have some good analysis. Can't argue there.
     
  3. Trajan
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    Trajan conscientia mille testes

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    :lol: yes, hes got a singular wit so to speak. ;)
     
  4. blastoff
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    blastoff Undocumented Reg. User

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    He's my favorite Rush fill in host. Cracks me up all the time, as he often does himself too. Even his laugh is funny to me.
     

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