Katrina's Lesson in Preparedness (or Lack Thereof)

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Adam's Apple, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Hurricane Katrina Gives A Painful Lesson in Readiness
    By Paul C. Light, The New Hampshire Union Leader
    September 5, 2005

    WASHINGTON SHOULD take heed of the chaos surrounding the early Hurricane Katrina relief effort. If this is what happens when the nation has two days of advance warning, imagine the aftermath of a surprise attack using a chemical, biological or nuclear device.

    Ironically, a Category 5 hurricane was already on the Department of Homeland Security’s list of 15 planning scenarios for emergency response. In an effort to give organizations more specific guidance about how to plan for catastrophic events, the department issued the scenarios last winter in the hopes that governments, businesses and charitable organizations would start rehearsing their response.

    Unfortunately, a yet-to-be-released survey by New York University suggests that most Americans expect disaster to hit just about anywhere but home. Most have enough canned goods and bottled water in the closet to last a few days, but they want their local police and fire agencies, the Red Cross and charities to tell them what to do in the event of a catastrophe. The problem with Katrina is that many citizens did not listen before the hurricane, and communications were cut off after. Plenty of emergency planners had nightmares about a Category 5 hurricane hitting somewhere, but few woke up and started preparing.

    Katrina underscores the urgent need to build a robust national preparedness and response system that can bend and flex to the unique circumstances of natural or human-caused catastrophes. Based on my analysis of hundreds of high-performing organizations identified by the nonpartisan Rand Corp., such a system must be alert to impending catastrophe, agile in implementing well-designed plans for response and recovery, adaptive to surprise events such as the collapse of the New Orleans levees, and aligned so that everyone can pull together, from Washington on down to the initial first-responder who shows up at the site of a disaster.

    Here are the four pillars of a robust response system:

    http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showfast.html?article=59878
     
  2. Abbey Normal
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    Abbey Normal Senior Member

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    And what exactly did the Mayor of New Orleans and the Governor of Louisiana do with this valuable information? Apparently, nothing. Then they have the gall to blame the Federal Gov't ("President Bush") for their pathetic lack of organization and preparedness.

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