Just a Thought

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Navy1960, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    WASHINGTON, Nov. 9, 2005 – The Base Realignment and Closure Commission's recommendations for reshaping the Defense Department's infrastructure and force structure officially took effect at 12:01 a.m. today after Congress allowed them to pass into law at the mandated Nov. 8 deadline.

    The nine-member BRAC panel delivered its final report to President Bush Sept. 8, and he, in turn, sent it to Congress for legislative review Sept. 15. Congress had 45 legislative days, until Nov. 9, to accept or reject the report in its entirety. However, it was not authorized to make any changes to the final report.

    By statute, the Defense Department now has until Sept. 15, 2007 -- two years from the date President Bush sent Congress the BRAC commission's final report -- , to begin closing and realigning the installations as called for in the report. The process must be completed by Sept. 15, 2011, DoD officials explained.

    The 2005 BRAC recommendations represent the most aggressive BRAC ever proposed, affecting more than 800 installations, officials said.

    The four previous BRAC rounds -- in 1988, 1991, 1993 and 1995 - resulted in 97 major closures, 55 major realignments and 235 minor actions, according to DoD figures. Overall, closing and realigning these installations saved taxpayers around $18 billion though fiscal 2001 and a further $7 billion per year since, officials said.
    DefenseLink News Article: BRAC Deadline Expires; DoD to Begin Closures, Realignments



    A symbol of Lackland AFB's rise to prominence in the modern Air Force for more than 50 years, Wilford Hall Medical Center will be demolished and replaced by a new facility — as early as next year.

    The Pentagon has hired an architect and construction company to design the project, listed as a top priority by Defense Department officials. Tearing down Wilford Hall and building a new outpatient clinic are expected to cost at least $440 million. But for now, one thing is missing: money from Congress.

    “The Air Force and the Department of Defense have clearly chosen that direction to go, and we have some indication that the Congress is supportive,” said Cem Maxwell, deputy director of the San Antonio Joint Program Office, which oversees 78 base closure construction projects. “But we don't have the check in hand yet, at least for the construction.”

    Congressional funding is expected for the project, part of a set of sweeping changes in how the military provides health care and training. Maxwell said $3.75 billion had been included for health facilities construction in one version of the economic stimulus bill, but the amount was cut by a House-Senate conference committee.

    Still, “I'm confident we're going in the right direction because we have the funding and the authority to proceed with design,” he said.

    One of three Level 1 trauma centers in town, Wilford Hall will merge its inpatient services with Brooke Army Medical Center. The 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission, commonly known as BRAC, ordered Wilford Hall to become an outpatient clinic, and it set aside funds for a partial renovation of the hospital.
    Wilford Hall to be razed; new clinic will go up

    In 1987, Congress enacted the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. Title V of
    that Act made serving the homeless the first priority for use of all surplus Federal
    properties, including military installations. Congress did not anticipate the scope of
    military base closures and realignments nor how the Title V priority of the McKinney Act
    would affect reuse of the installations.
    http://www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/homeless/programs/brac/guide/guide.pdf


    The reason I started this thread is to show people that there are many ways the Govt. can provide for people that are in need if the would apply some common sense rather than looking to just throw money at a solution, especially money we do not have. Take the Medical Installation in San Antonio that will be demolished, I have personally been there more than once it was a large facility, yes, it was located on an AFB however a problem solved if it meant providing low cost healthcare to the thousands of local residents without it. There is a base in San Antonio called Brooks that is somewhat closed already with many buildings just sitting empty, can you imagine a nation that would recondition those homes and give them to its wounded warriors as a simple thank you rather than letting them fall into ruin, and rather than letting those warriors perhaps end up in poverty. What about converting the facilities into a campus? As you can see there are many things that can be done with money that has been spent and with facilities that are in place, shoud our govt. so decide to actually take the time to do the hard work needed. These are just suggestions and frankly some that should be worth consideration in my opinion..

    [​IMG]

    Thats just one abandoned hospital that the govt. just let go and we are talking about lack of medical care?
     
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  2. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    For Sale or Lease By Owner: 1,000 acres adjacent to major municipality. Approximately 400 buildings included. Space includes office, manufacturing, warehouse, and more. Site has golf course, small airfield, roads,

    The U.S. Armed Forces are looking down the barrel. Hundreds of decommissioned bases across the country are waiting to be sold. In the Navy alone, funding cuts have targeted 135 installations since 1988. While military cutbacks make many local communities nervous for some it means the loss of thousands of jobs - the trend could prove a boon to companies looking to expand or relocate.
    For sale: decommissioned military base. | Environment & Natural Resources > Pollution Monitoring, Prevention & Remediation from AllBusiness.com
     
  3. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    As someone currently involved in a BRAC move I see the problem from the inside. Many bases are being closed or consolidated. In my case, it involves closing perfectly functional facilities and building new ones on another base to serve the same function.
    In a booming economy, those abandoned buildings would have new occupants ready to move in. But with timing the final BRAC during a recession, many abandoned military facilities will remain unoccupied for decades.
    Much of the abandoned infrastructure is out of date and needs to be updated to current codes. Military facilities also ignored environmental requirements for decades and need a major cleanup
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2009
  4. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    While thats true from a funding standpoint, you have several with facilites that with minimal effort (rw) and I mean from a funding standpoint would IMHO would provide a useful benefit to the entire nation in terms of jobs, healthcare, housing, cleanup, etc. the list is endless. I retired from the military and am well aware that some of these facilities need a lot of work , however I'm also aware that there are countless numbers of them that can with a little effort be put to good use and be seen as a benefit rather than liability to the DoD, and perhaps get more people to see BRAC as less a end of life as we know it thing and a new beginning.
     
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  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Here in Oregon, and I am sure that is the case in the whole nation, we have had many of our soldiers come home hurt, and unable to go back to their old work. Not because of heartlessness of employers, but because those employers are no longer in business.

    Navy, I think that your idea of just giving some of those homes to our soldiers that have come home to an economy that has foreclosed on their homes, and offers no jobs is one of the best that I have heard in a long time. Why don't you write is up, and send it in to your representatives, as well as the President?
     
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  6. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    Actually I mentioned the idea a couple of weeks ago at my last reunion and overall the response was very positive. Personally, I think its a small thing to offer those that have sacrificed so much for this nation. If you stop and think about the homeless situation among vets. its a real shame. To be hones I was thinking about sending the idea to Sen. McCain, and Sen. Kyl. If you also stop and think about it, these vets would in exchange for these properties have a purpose and that is to take care of them. Perhaps you can call them Recorvery and Rehab centers, or Long Term Living Bases. There are limitless possibilites that can be done with them. One other thing to consider here as well is the number of jobs that will be created to support the infrastructure that surrounds the bases. So rather than these towns losing an economic source they gain one and in the process rebuild lives and thank those young men and women for doing so.
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Not often that Old Rocks and I will agree, but this is one of those precious few.
     
  8. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    It's interesting how this idea came about, I was having a discussion with a friend who is a surgeon that works with wounded vets at my reunion, and he mentioned that after they had gone through all of the rehab and were discharged that some of his earlier patients were asking if he could find them work, that sort of thing. It sort of broke my heart to hear that, so we just started talking and I mentioned the idea to him and it sorta went from there. What I think we will do is this, create a web page advocating the idea and encourage people to write or call congress. Perhaps it's something that we can all agree on for a change.
     
  9. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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  10. RodISHI
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    RodISHI Gold Member

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    Good thread. I watched a facility that sold down in KC go for eighty grand, 18 acres and seven buildings that could have easily been revamped to facilitate something very worthwhile for the community. There is a place over in Omaha that will most likely go for very little also. These buildings could be used to help something other than just a few investors.
     

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