Is Protectionism Finally Dead?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by American Legacy, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. American Legacy
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    American Legacy Federalist

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    Eighteen years ago, a Democratic president signed the Bush free trade agreement known as NAFTA. Today the Wall Street Journal is reporting that our current Democratic president is pushing for a vote on the Bush free trade agreements with South Korea, Columbia and Panama. It seems, at least in the White House, that free trade continues to enjoy bipartisan support in opening up new markets to U.S. goods and lowering prices for U.S. consumers. I remember how fierce the opposition to NAFTA was, a leading reason for Ross Perot and the Reform Party's emergence, but it seems that now, as then, protectionism is on the wrong side of history.

    Is protectionism still alive and well? Is there still a debate over the benefits of free trade?
     
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    Last edited: Jun 29, 2011
  2. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    Why am I paying $8 for a six pack of Corona? Lower prices my ass.
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    The American version of Brexit...
    [​IMG]
    North American leaders confront rising protectionism
    Thu, Jun 30, 2016 - The leaders of North America confront a rising tide of economic protectionism and nationalism as they held a summit yesterday in the Canadian capital.
    See also:

    Trump promises to rip up global trade deals
    Thu, Jun 30, 2016 - US Republican presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump on Tuesday vowed to rip up international trade deals and start an unrelenting offensive against Chinese economic practices, framing his contest with Democratic rival Hillary Rodham Clinton as a choice between hard-edge nationalism and the policies of “a leadership class that worships globalism.”
     

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