Iran's crisis of civilization

Discussion in 'General Global Topics' started by RonPrice, Aug 9, 2009.

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    RonPrice Mr. RonPrice

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    Iran's crisis of civilization will be resolved neither by blind imitation of an obviously defective Western culture nor by retreat into medieval ignorance which often seems to be the direction taken by religious and political elites in Iran. The answer to the dilemma faced by Iran was enunciated on the very threshold of the crisis of modernity in the late 19th century, in the clearest and most compelling language, by a distinguished Son of Iran Who is today honoured in every continent of the world, but sadly not in the land of His birth--except by a religious minority now referred to by Iranian political and religious authorities as heretical.

    Persia's poetic genius captures the irony of the position of this religious minority: "I searched the wide world over for my Beloved, while my Beloved was waiting for me in my own home." The world's appreciation of Bahá'u'lláh, the Founder of the Baha'i Faith, came perhaps most explicitly into focus on 29 May 1992, the centenary of His death, when the Brazilian Chamber of Deputies met in solemn session to pay tribute to Him, to His teachings and to the services rendered to humanity by the community He founded. On that occasion, the Speaker of the Chamber and spokespersons from every party rose, successively, to express their profound admiration of One who was described in their addresses as the Author of "the most colossal religious work written by the pen of a single Man", a message that "reaches out to humanity as a whole, without petty differences of nationality, race, limits or belief".

    One of the most appalling afflictions, in terms of its tragic consequences, has been the slander of Bahá'u'lláh's Cause perpetrated by that privileged caste to whom Persia's masses had been taught to look for guidance in spiritual matters. For over 150 years, every medium of public information-- pulpit, press, radio, television and even scholarly publication--has been perverted to create an image of the Bahá'í community and its beliefs that is grossly false and whose sole aim is to arouse popular contempt and antagonism. No calumny has been too vile; no lie too outrageous. At no point during those long years were the Baha'is, the victims of this vilification, given an opportunity, however slight, to defend themselves and or to provide the facts that would have exposed such calculated poisoning of the public mind.

    Ruling elites can make no more serious error than to imagine that the power they have managed to arrogate to themselves provides an enduring bulwark against the relentless tides of historical change. Today, in Iran, as everywhere throughout the world, these tides roll in with insistent urgency and tumultuous force. They are not merely at the door of the house, but they rise up irresistibly through its floors. They cannot be diverted. They will not be denied, perhaps not today but tomorrow---for tomorrow is another day.-Ron Price, Tasmania
     
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    Desecration of graves in Iran ‘violation of civilised behaviour’

    SYDNEY, 12 AUG 2014

    [​IMG]

    Desecration of historic Baha’i cemetery in Shiraz continues after brief pause. (Photo courtesy of Baha'i World News Service).

    Revolutionary Guards in Iran have disinterred the remains of up to 50 deceased Baha’is and placed them in an open canal to make way for a building project in the city of Shiraz.


    The Guards exhumed the remains from their last resting places in the Baha’i cemetery, which they began demolishing earlier this year in preparation for the construction of a new cultural and sports complex.

    Worldwide media pressure and expressions of outrage from Iranians of all religious backgrounds had led to a short pause in the demolition but it has now resumed.

    Desecration of cemeteries is just one feature of an officially-backed comprehensive, systematic program of persecution of Iran’s biggest non-Muslim religious minority.

    Between 2005 and 2012 at least 42 Baha'i-owned cemeteries were attacked by firebombing, toppling of gravestones, uprooting of trees, spray-painting of graffiti and exhumation of bodies.

    The persecution also involves large-scale arrests and imprisonments, violent attacks, and systematic discrimination. Seven Baha’i leaders are now more than six years into 20 year sentences, and more than 100 other Baha’is are in jail, all without fair trials.

    Australian Baha’i Community spokesperson Natalie Mobini condemned the interference with the graves and the ongoing demolition, and said the Iranian authorities should stop it immediately.

    “Discarding human remains without respect is clearly a violation of civilised behaviour, a breach of standards of decency established for centuries,” Dr Mobini said.

    “Baha’is in Shiraz have appealed to authorities to halt the construction, and also proposed that the sports complex be built elsewhere on the site while the graveyard itself is turned into a green space – but their efforts have been to no avail.

    “This appalling act has caused grief to many Baha'is in Australia whose relatives and friends are among the 950 Baha’is buried in the cemetery.”

    Wollongong Baha’i Khosrow Kouhbor said the desecration was deeply distressing to him.


    “My parents and grandparents are buried in that cemetery and deserve to be able to rest in peace,” Mr Kouhbor said. “The President of Iran should call an immediate halt to this shameful act,” he said.


    Canberra Baha’i Fahimeh Khanlari said news of the desecration of the cemetery, where her brother was buried in 1966, had left her devastated. "When I heard the news of the excavation recently, I could hardly talk to anyone for two weeks and I would just cry and cry,” she said.


    Albany Baha’is Mahshid Ferdowsian and Iran Milne said they have relatives buried in the cemetery, some of whom were executed solely for their religious beliefs. They expressed their distress about the desecration of the cemetery.


    Mrs Ferdowsian: “In any culture, in any religion, this is a very forbidden thing to do.”

    For more information visit: Shiraz cemetery destruction resumes - Bah World News Service

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