I'm speechless!! Article about Condi Rice..

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Stephanie, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    What Rice Can't See

    By Eugene Robinson

    Tuesday, October 25, 2005; Page A21

    Like a lot of African Americans, I've long wondered what the deal was with Condoleezza Rice and the issue of race. How does she work so loyally for George W. Bush, whose approval rating among blacks was measured in a recent poll at a negligible 2 percent? How did she come to a worldview so radically different from that of most black Americans? Is she blind, is she in denial, is she confused -- or what?

    After spending three days with the secretary of state and her entourage as she toured Birmingham, where she grew up in a protective bubble as the tumult of the civil rights movement swirled around her, I have a partial answer: It's as if Rice is still cosseted in her beloved Titusville, the neighborhood of black strivers where she was raised, able to see the very different reality that other African Americans experience but not to reach out of the bubble -- not able to touch that other reality, and thus not able to really understand it.

    Rice's parents tried their best to shelter their only daughter from Jim Crow racism, and they succeeded. Forty years later, Rice shows no bitterness when she recalls her childhood in a town whose streets were ruled by the segregationist police chief Bull Connor. "I've always said about Birmingham that because race was everything, race was nothing," she said in an interview on the flight home.

    When she reminisces, she talks of piano lessons and her brief attempt at ballet -- not of Connor setting his dogs loose on brave men, women and children marching for freedom, which is the Birmingham that other residents I met still remember. A friend of Rice's, Denise McNair, was one of the four girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. That would have left a deep scar on me, but Rice can speak of that atrocity without visible emotion.

    She doesn't deny that race makes a difference. "We all look forward to the day when this country is race-blind, but it isn't yet," she told reporters in Birmingham. Later she added, "The fact that our society is not colorblind is a statement of fact."

    But then why are the top echelons of her State Department almost entirely white? "That's an artifact of foreign policy," she said in the interview. "It's not been a very diverse profession." In other words, there aren't enough qualified minority candidates. I wondered how many times those words have been used as a lame excuse.

    One of the things she somehow missed was that in Titusville and other black middle-class enclaves, a guiding principle was that as you climbed, you were obliged to reach back and bring others along. Rice has been a foreign policy heavyweight for nearly two decades; she spent four years in the White House as the president's national security adviser. In the interview, she mentioned just one black professional she has brought with her from the National Security Council to State.

    As we were flying to Alabama, Rice said an interesting thing. She was talking about the history of the civil rights movement, and she said, "If you read Frederick Douglass, he was not petitioning from outside of the institutions but rather demanding that the institutions live up to what they said they were. If you read Martin Luther King, he was not petitioning from outside, he was petitioning from inside the principles and the institutions, and challenging America to be what America said that it was."

    The civil rights movement came from the inside? I always thought the Edmund Pettus Bridge was outside.

    I know very few black Americans who think of themselves fully as insiders in this society. No matter how high we rise, there's always that reality that Rice acknowledges: The society isn't colorblind, not yet. It's not always in the front of your mind, but it's there. We talk about it, we overcome it, but it's there.

    When Rice was growing up, her father stood guard at the entrance of her neighborhood with a rifle to keep the Klan's nightriders away. But that was outside the bubble. Inside the bubble, Rice was sitting at the piano in pretty dresses to play Bach fugues. It sounds like a wonderful childhood, but one that left her able to see the impact that race has in America -- able to examine it and analyze it -- but not to feel it.

    If there's a "Rosebud" to decode the enigma that is Condoleezza Rice, it's Titusville.
     
  2. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Well you have to understand who Eugene Robinson is. He was the one that promoted the theory that black people were eating each other after only 13 hours of hurricane Katrina in New Orleans because of Bush's incompetence to give them aide. He also promoted the theory that there were bombs placed at the levees in order to kill black people in NO. He's one of the most racist people ive ever read.

    Of course he doesnt like Condi. Shes just a stupid house ****** to him. He basically explained that in his article. Since her parents recognized how fucked up the culture was in Birmingham and wanted a better life for their daughter, they were assholes. they should have suffered through the race riots like others did instead of overcoming race and striving to be the best they could be. So her success is proof of his failure and that most of all pisses him off.
     
  3. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    I also have no idea where he got that 2 percent. In the last election, the black vote was pretty evenly split, if I remember correctly, and if I didn't, it was still better than some sad 2%.
     
  4. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    So Condi Rice is somehow less of a black person, because she doesn't share the oppressed black experience with other Southern blacks??? :wtf: :cuckoo:
     
  5. ScreamingEagle
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    ScreamingEagle Gold Member

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    Gee, why not just come out and call Condi an Oreo to her face? What a hatchet job. :death:
     
  6. Bonnie
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    Bonnie Senior Member

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    Fear is making them spin already...Kind of funny actually, if it wasn't so ridiculously obvious.
     

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