I found this very interesting

Discussion in 'Environment' started by auditor0007, Apr 30, 2011.

  1. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    Ancient Ship Found Near Rome


    Ancient Ship Found Near Rome

    So why would the coastline have been so much further inland only 2500 years ago? I'm sure there could be a number of explanations, but the one that came to mind immediately was that ocean levels must have been substantially higher than now. I'm just curious if that was the case or if there was another cause.
     
  2. liebuster
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    liebuster VIP Member

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    The sea levels were higher back then because of all the SUVs. Duh!:cuckoo:
     
  3. zzzz
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    zzzz Just a regular American

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    Could it be that the area is rising? The rise and fall of landmasses occur frequently yet spaced out over time. In the Yellowstone we are seeing this.

    I just wonder how much water is lost to space every year if any. Certainly the planet has lost some when large meteors crash into the oceans. Curious.
     
  4. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Soil accretion from the Tiber is the cause of it.

    Even during ancient times Rome had to dredge the harbor to keep it open.
     
  5. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    soil accretion of 2.5 miles!!!!!!:lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao:



    [​IMG]
     
  6. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    The water on this planet was brought to us via meteroites, ZZZZ.

    We probably still get more water from meteorites than we lose ever year.
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    From the statement concerning the groundwater, Editec is almost certainly correct is his statement concerning the silting of the site. Were it further south in Italy, it could well have resulted from the rapid tectonic movements in that area.

    Ostia - Archaeological news

    30 April 2011 - Ship found near Tor Boacciana
    A few weeks ago, a wooden ship of the Roman age was discovered at a depth of almost four meters, during a rescue dig at the site of one of the pillars for the new bridge of the Via della Scafa near Ostia Antica. The absence of nails or iron structures has dated the ship to the Imperial age. It is the first Roman ship ever to be found near Ostia.

    Archaeologists so far have uncovered an 11 meter section of one side of the ship. Its total length could be about 13 meters, which is about the size of the vessels Fiumicino 1 and 2 of the Museo delle Navi di Fiumicino, discovered in the sixties of the last century. The new site is located near the Tiber and along the former coast directly to the north of Tor Boacciana. The ship has been preserved by the mud in which it is embedded and thanks to the high groundwater table. Its state of conservation is excellent.

    The 28th of April the Italian Minister of Culture has visited the site, and the new find was presented to the press. Anna Maria Moretti, archaeological Superintendent for Rome and Ostia, said restoring the ship "will be an extremely delicate operation". "We're keeping it constantly covered in water so that the wood doesn't dry out", she said. "The wreck must be treated with highly sophisticated preservation techniques".

    The excavations will continue under the supervision of Paola Germoni of the Superintendency of Rome and Ostia and the archaeologist Alessandra Ghelli. Various specialists are involved in the preservation of the vessel and the study of the site.
     
  8. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    Or, just possibly, both you and the OP are idiots. Ostia is actually still on the coast even though it is no longer a thriving city. It seems Italy has other ports more suited to modern shipping than one that existed solely because it was close to Rome. Close, in this case, being about 15 miles.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011
  9. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Yes.

    You really don't know much about much of anything, do you?

    Over 2000 years that's not really much at all.

    Go read book.
     
  10. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    Thanks, I wasn't certain what the cause. After Mindless Windbag's statement, I did some research, and you are correct. The movement of the coastline is attributed to silting and has accounted for at least a two mile move in the coastline.
     

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