Human Nature and Our Political System

Discussion in 'Politics' started by TheFatDoctor, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. TheFatDoctor
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    TheFatDoctor Rookie

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    The study of human behavior has taught us valuable and seemingly contradicting lessons. While incentives and survival are our primary motivators there are also negative aspects of human character that are not well amended by the "will" of the individual. It is the case that any successful system of government contains instances both of these theories, yet instead of a employing both of these concepts in crafting and supporting policy, we are perpetually pitting them against each other. Conservatives are seen as "anti-populist," with exclusionary policies, while liberals are seen as "socialist" because of a benefit of more-for- many doctrine. It is my humble opinion that neither of these positions is worthy of sweeping use and defense, but there is nothing more certain in life than blind adherence to this dichotomy. I challenge the conscientious participants of this discussion to analyze how there own understanding of human behavior impacts their politics.
     
  2. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    You had me till this line. At this point, I have no freakin clue what you're trying to say. What teh heck are exclusionary policies? What the heck is the "more-for-many doctrine"?

    Obvious human nature is something that needs to be considered. Which is exactly why I favor conservative policies.
     
  3. Midnight Marauder
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    Midnight Marauder BANNED

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    Yeah, what a bunch of psychobabble. If you're going to post this nonsense, why not try to at least get the punctuation and spelling right?
     
  4. TheFatDoctor
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    TheFatDoctor Rookie

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    Anti-Populist means that a policy is tailored to specific group rather than general population or a wider subgroup. Typically, this means they are elitist-such as tax cuts for the wealthy, or reduction in Medicare for the disadvantaged. Although it doesn't always have to be elitist. Hence, exclusionary. However Obamacare is populist and socialist by definition. Do not misinterpret, I am not showing bias towards one philosophy or the other
     
  5. TheFatDoctor
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    TheFatDoctor Rookie

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    Um, this board has a spellcheck built in. And punctuation? Are you the comma police? Not that I care, but you could have at least provided an example. However, the subject matter is obviously over your head. What I was attempting to do was examine fundamentally what types of actions our government should be taking and why. For instance, Republicans generally believe that incentives and survival are our primary motivators. Hence their so called, pro-capitalistic policies. A " natural selection" of people and businesses. Employees don't need to unionize, shouldn't get a minimum wage ect. Liberals typically believe that welfare programs allow the people the resources to succeed, and the more support they have from the government the better off we are as a population. "Psycho-babble?" What does that even mean? Social and Economic theory are built on your so called " Psycho-babble."
     

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