Gore Laments U.S. 'Abuses' Against Arabs

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Lefty Wilbury, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. Lefty Wilbury
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    Lefty Wilbury Active Member

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    http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/w-me/2006/feb/12/021206994.html


    Gore Laments U.S. 'Abuses' Against Arabs
    By JIM KRANE
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia (AP) -

    Former Vice President Al Gore told a mainly Saudi audience on Sunday that the U.S. government committed "terrible abuses" against Arabs after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, and that most Americans did not support such treatment.

    Gore said Arabs had been "indiscriminately rounded up" and held in "unforgivable" conditions. The former vice president said the Bush administration was playing into al-Qaida's hands by routinely blocking Saudi visa applications.

    "The thoughtless way in which visas are now handled, that is a mistake," Gore said during the Jiddah Economic Forum. "The worst thing we can possibly do is to cut off the channels of friendship and mutual understanding between Saudi Arabia and the United States."

    Gore told the largely Saudi audience, many of them educated at U.S. universities, that Arabs in the United States had been "indiscriminately rounded up, often on minor charges of overstaying a visa or not having a green card in proper order, and held in conditions that were just unforgivable."

    "Unfortunately there have been terrible abuses and it's wrong," Gore said. "I do want you to know that it does not represent the desires or wishes or feelings of the majority of the citizens of my country."

    On Iran, Gore complained of "endemic hyper-corruption" among Tehran's religious and political elite and asked Arabs to take a stand against Iran's nuclear program.

    Iran says its program is for peaceful purposes but the United States and other Western countries suspect Tehran is trying to develop nuclear weapons.

    "Is it only for the West to say this is dangerous?" Gore asked. "We should have more people in this region saying this is dangerous."

    Several audience members criticized the United States for what they described as "unconditional" U.S. support for Israel, saying U.S. diplomats helped Israel flout U.N. resolutions that they enforced when the measures targeted Arabs.

    Gore refused to be drawn into questions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

    "We can't solve that long conflict in exchanges here," Gore said.

    Also at the forum, the vice chairman of Chevron Corp., Peter Robertson, said President Bush's desire to cut U.S. dependence on Mideast oil shows a "misunderstanding" of global energy supply and the critical role of Saudi Arabia.

    In his State of the Union address this month, Bush pledged to cut U.S. dependence on Middle East oil by 75 percent by 2025.

    "This notion of being energy independent is completely unreasonable," Robertson said at the economic forum, which opened Saturday.

    "I believe Middle Eastern oil can and must play a certain role in the system," Robertson said. "Saudi Arabia's massive resources will continue to promote international energy security and serve as a moderating force in balancing supply and demand."

    Cherie Blair, wife of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, made a plea at the forum for women's rights, telling Saudi leaders that the dearth of women in the work force was "undermining economic potential" of the kingdom.

    Irish President Mary McAleese urged Saudi Arabia to learn from Ireland's economic transformation, which hinged on opening the country to the outside world and ushering women into the workplace.

    ---
     
  2. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    He should be tried and hanged for treason
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Only Al Gore would suc*up more too the Saudis than the administration has. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Mariner
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    Mariner Active Member

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    making this point to the Saudis? The people who need to think about this are here at home.

    I'm having alot of trouble understanding how readily people here condemn Islamic extremists (the bombers, kidnappers, and beheaders) while brushing official U.S. mistreatment and killing of often innocent detainees under the rug. I condemn BOTH--I do not excuse Islamist extremists, Cp, but I think we have to distinguish them from most Muslims, just as the I.R.A. did not represent most Christians in its terror campaign. I believe we would make much headway in the "hearts and minds" war, which is really the whole war on terror, if we we prosecuted our own offenders better--no matter how high up the ranks they were found.

    Among the most egregious examples was a taxi driver in Afghanistan who is believed to have been completely innocent. Here's a piece from today's NY Times concerning how prosecutions for deaths such as his are stalled.

    The New York Times
    February 13, 2006
    The Bagram File
    Years After 2 Afghans Died, Abuse Case Falters

    By TIM GOLDEN
    FORT BLISS, Tex. — In the chronicle of abuses that has emerged from America's fight against terror, there may be no story more jarring than that of the two young men killed at a United States military detention center in Afghanistan in December 2002.

    The two Afghans were found dead within days of each other, hanging by their shackled wrists in isolation cells at the prison in Bagram, north of Kabul. An Army investigation showed they were treated harshly by interrogators, deprived of sleep for days, and struck so often in the legs by guards that a coroner compared the injuries to being run over by a bus.

    But more than a year after the Army began a major push to prosecute those responsible for the abuse of the two men and several other prisoners at Bagram, that effort has faltered badly.

    Of 27 soldiers and officers against whom Army investigators had recommended criminal charges, 15 have been prosecuted. Five of those have pleaded guilty to assault and other crimes; the stiffest punishment any of them have received has been five months in a military prison. Only one soldier has been convicted at trial; he was not imprisoned at all.

    While military lawyers said the pleas were negotiated in exchange for information or testimony against other soldiers, the prosecution has gained no evident momentum. Four former guards accused of assaulting detainees were all acquitted in recent courts-martial. Charges against a fifth former guard were dropped.

    In one of the prosecutors' most important tests, the Army last month abandoned its case against Capt. Christopher M. Beiring, the former military police commander at Bagram and one of the few American officers since 9/11 to face criminal charges related to the abuse of detainees by the officers' subordinates.

    * * *

    Here's the link: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/13/n...?_r=1&th=&oref=slogin&emc=th&pagewanted=print

    The whole article suggests that a prime cause of abuse was interrogators being unclear about what the official torture/interrogation policies were.

    Mariner
     
  5. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Not treason, sedition. There is a difference.

    Treason is aiding an enemy of the United States.

    Sedition is inciting treason or other violence against the United States.
     
  6. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    why won't he die?

    (sigh).
     
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  7. ScreamingEagle
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    ScreamingEagle Gold Member

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    Cheney should invite him along on a pheasant hunt. :cof:
     
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  8. Hagbard Celine
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    Hagbard Celine Senior Member

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    [​IMG]

    HA-ha!
     
  9. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Deer---better chance of killing him.
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    From a 'moderate' at best blogger, not impressed with Al. Links at site:


    http://www.themoderatevoice.com/posts/1139861375.shtml
     

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