Gen. Giap Thanks Kerry & Co. for Antiwar Protests

Discussion in 'Politics' started by jimnyc, May 1, 2004.

  1. jimnyc
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    jimnyc ...

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    Celebrating the 29th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, the North Vietnamese general who led his forces to victory said Friday he was grateful to leaders of the U.S. antiwar movement, one of whom was presidential candidate John Kerry.

    "I would like to thank them," said General Vo Nguyen Giap, now 93, without mentioning Kerry by name. "Any forces that wish to impose their will on other nations will surely fail," he added.

    Reuters, which first reported Giap's comments, suggested that the former enemy general was mindful of Kerry's role in leading some of the highest profile antiwar protests of the entire Vietnam war.

    Before the British wire service quoted Gen. Giap, it noted:

    "The Vietnam War, known in Vietnam as the American War, has become a hot issue in the U.S. presidential race with Democrat John Kerry drawing attention to his service and President Bush's Republicans disparaging Kerry's later anti-war stand."

    North Vietnamese Colonel Bui Tin, who served under Gen. Giap on the general staff of the North Vietnamese army, received South Vietnam's unconditional surrender on April 30, 1975.

    In an interview with the Wall Street Journal after his retirement, Col. Tin explicitly credited leaders of the U.S. anti-war movement, saying they were "essential to our strategy."

    "Every day our leadership would listen to world news over the radio at 9AM to follow the growth of the antiwar movement," Col. Tin told the Journal.

    Visits to Hanoi by Kerry antiwar allies Jane Fonda and former Attorney General Ramsey Clark and others, he said, "gave us confidence that we should hold on in the face of battlefield reverses."

    "We were elated when Jane Fonda, wearing a red Vietnamese dress, said at a press conference that she was ashamed of American actions in the war," the North Vietnamese military man explained.

    Kerry did much the same thing in widely covered speeches like the one he delivered to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in April 1971.

    "Through dissent and protest [America] lost the ability to mobilize a will to win," Col. Tin concluded.

    http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2004/5/1/110432.shtml
     
  2. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    This is surely true today with our current conflict.
     
  3. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Indeed.
     
  4. eric
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    eric Guest

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    Seems our enemies just adore the fool !:mad:
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    and Kerry fits the bill!
     
  6. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    WASHINGTON — Sen. Joe Lieberman (search) on Monday urged an end to partisan bickering over the Iraq war, saying such debate hurts U.S. efforts on the battlefield by demoralizing soldiers and encouraging the enemy.


    In a speech to the liberal-leaning Brookings Institution (search), the Connecticut senator and former Democratic presidential candidate said the two major political parties aren't far apart on key issues surrounding the conflict.

    He noted that President Bush and Democratic presidential rival John Kerry (search) agree that the United States must not abandon Iraq, that more troops are needed and that the international community should be more involved.

    But he said partisan bickering — expected to follow Thursday's scheduled testimony by Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney (search) before the independent Sept. 11 commission and Saturday's first anniversary of Bush's speech celebrating the fall of Baghdad — hurts the country's efforts on the battlefield.

    "We can no longer afford such partisan politics as usual" because it "encourages our enemies" and confuses or demoralizes the soldiers serving in Iraq, Lieberman said.

    full story
     
  7. eric
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    eric Guest

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    IMHO, if Bush had to lose the upcomming election I would much rather have seen Joe in office than Kerry !!!
     

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