For The Military Vets, What Do You Make Of This?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by NATO AIR, Oct 15, 2004.

  1. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    i'm unsure how to view this... i can understand where the soldiers might be coming from but it still doesn't seem to make much sense.

     
  2. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    I read this in the paper today. Of course, none of us know all the details, so it's hard to tell what the deal is. It could have been that the route was more dangerous than the commanders knew or thought. But, frankly, there were many fuel/supply soldiers in WWII who drove through enemy territory to supply the guys on the front lines. So I don't really know what the deal is. Maybe we will find out more.
     
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  3. UsaPride
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    UsaPride Senior Member

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    I've been hearing this on the news all day, I don't know if it's just one soldier or all, but I know that at least one was stationed here at Ft. Bragg. We're supposed to be hearing all about it "Tonight at Eleven" :D
    The female soldier called her mom and said they got in trouble and weren't even supposed to use the phone. Hello? You just got in trouble for not doing what you're told (whether right or wrong) but you know damn well you're not supposed to be using the phone, so you go call your momma? :confused:
    From the article above, I guess she wasn't the only one. :tinfoil:
     
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  4. Johnney
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    Johnney Senior Member

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    i read this when it came out. imsure all us Vets out there can appreciate <i>properly working</i> equipment in normal everyday military life. now put that in a combat environment. i can see where they are coming from, but at the same time they put what ever unit they were delivering to on the spot. they need the beans and bullets to survive. but if they convoy doesnt survive... better equipment is the bottom line
     
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  5. Merlin1047
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    Merlin1047 Senior Member

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    Not enough detail yet.

    The soldiers may have been correct in refusing to carry out the mission if their equipment was in fact unserviceable.

    For example, in aviation there are certain discrepancies which render an aircraft unflyable. These are referred to as "red X", which is the symbol used in the aircraft logbook to indicate that there is a condition which grounds the aircraft. Other army vehicles have similar maintenance procedures and restrictions. If the trucks were red X'ed then the soldiers could have been correct in refusing the mission.

    The commander has the authority to downgrade a red X in order to allow equipment normally considered unsafe to be operated regardless of status in the event of a tactical emergency. However, if the commander does this, his ass is on the line should something fail.

    If the soldiers refused the mission simply because it was hazardous, then they're in deep kiemchee, and rightfully so.

    But right now, we don't have the details we need to make a call on this one. We'll just have to wait and see.
     
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