Does Anyone Know About Refrigerators?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by 007, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. 007
    Offline

    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    38,589
    Thanks Received:
    7,920
    Trophy Points:
    1,130
    Ratings:
    +12,190
    I mean once and for all, can you lay the damn things down when you transport them or not? What is in there that it will effect? Why or why not can't you lay one over?

    I bought this huge, used Amana refrigerator for the shop because it was so clean inside and obviously a very nice frig. The only way I could move it was to slide it in the back of my truck bed laying down. Well I get it home, get it out of the truck, with help, get it in the garage, let it sit for a few hours before I plugged it in because that's what the guy said to do, finally plugged it in and it took right off and seemed to cool down right away. Now this morning I check it and it's not doing anything. So, did I fuck it up by laying it down to move it, or did this ass potato rip me off?
     
  2. RadiomanATL
    Offline

    RadiomanATL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    24,944
    Thanks Received:
    3,823
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Not here
    Ratings:
    +3,836
    If you lay it on its side, the oil runs out of the compressor and into the refrigerant. If you have to transport a fridge on its side or back, you have to let it sit upright for a few hours before you plug it in, or else you can screw up the compressor. Now, it sounds like you let it sit, but it's also a used and older fridge, so its tolerances for being bounced around on its side are probably much lower.
     
  3. Xenophon
    Offline

    Xenophon Gone and forgotten

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2008
    Messages:
    16,705
    Thanks Received:
    3,750
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    In your head
    Ratings:
    +3,751
  4. Ringel05
    Offline

    Ringel05 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    40,316
    Thanks Received:
    8,024
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    El Paso, TX
    Ratings:
    +17,471
    I've laid them down for transport numerous times and never had a problem, (though I've been yelled at for doing it). You have to let it sit upright for at least a day afterwards to allow the coolant to settle. It's possible you burned up the cooling pump but it's also possible the fridge was on it's last legs any way.
    One other very important question. Is the fridge not working at all, no lights, etc? If this is the case two things - check the breaker and #2 try a different outlet. Fridges draw a lot of current and ideally should be on a dedicated circuit.
     
  5. 007
    Offline

    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    38,589
    Thanks Received:
    7,920
    Trophy Points:
    1,130
    Ratings:
    +12,190
    Sorry I didn't clarify that... yes there's lights and the pump is running. Very quietly I might add. So the thermostat works, the pump works, but no cooling, and I let it sit for over five hours before I plugged it in.

    Looks like I've been had. $100 down the drain.

    Edit: Actually, it's too quite. The more I listen to it, it sounds like there's a fan running but no compressor. Well, it's nice enough that I think I'll have someone come over and take a look at it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  6. slackjawed
    Offline

    slackjawed Self deported

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,307
    Thanks Received:
    645
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    15th congressional district of Arizona
    Ratings:
    +645
    Sometimes, and I emphasize sometimes, when you lay one down or even bounce one around upright, the oil in the compressor runs up into the coils. Sometimes, emphasize sometimes, when you set it back upright some oil stays in the coils, creating a bubble. The pump will run and you get little or no cooling. The thing is, this oil is thick, and like most oils, cold temps make it thicker, usually.
    I would suggest setting the fridge upright, unplugged, in a heated garage for a couple days. Maybe(emphasize maybe) the oil will run out of the coils and back into the pump. Try it again, it might work.
    Also, jarring a fridge around can damage the thermostat control, or make it stick. When you turn the knob to adjust the temp, you should be able to hear little clicks, or even witness the compresser going on and off. The thermostat control is fairly inexpensive and does not require a license to change out as there is no chance of release of refridgerant.(sp)
    If that doesn't work, it usually is cheaper to fix one than buy another. If this fridge runs, it probobly isn't a complete waste of 100 bucks. It might cost 50 to get it running. It is usually cheaper to load it up and take it to a repair shop to get it fixed than to have a repairman come out.
    If you are handy and have a voltmeter, you can test the draw of the fridge at different times during it's cycle, and compare that with the manufactures data. If it draws significantly more (or less) that what Amana says it should, you have a problem. The problem can be replaced though.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  7. 007
    Offline

    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    38,589
    Thanks Received:
    7,920
    Trophy Points:
    1,130
    Ratings:
    +12,190
    Yeah I'm giving it another break, (I let it sit for five hours before I plugged it in the first time), I have it unplugged. So if it doesn't start cooling after I plug it back in, (yes I can hear the thermostat clicking, but it doesn't appear the compressor is kicking in), then I'm going to have someone come out and look at it. The thing is massive. I had to take the doors and hinges off the frig and the house door off it's hinges to get it in here. Ain't goin' through that again. But it's worth it to get it fixed. It's an Amana, Energy Saver, very nicely built, heavy duty, all metal braced shelves with glass, everything adjustable, nothing broken, super clean, bottom freezer which I love, and did I mention it was HUGE? ... :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  8. slackjawed
    Offline

    slackjawed Self deported

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,307
    Thanks Received:
    645
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    15th congressional district of Arizona
    Ratings:
    +645
    huge huh, lol. Stock up my friend you might need it!
    I would agree it is worth getting fixed. If the relay switch tripped that allows the actual flow of oil from the compressor, it would not cool. Sometimes it will reset. I had an old fridge in a store that wasn't working and we used it like that to keep night-crawlers for sale in. It sat about a week when one day I heard a loud clear click from the bottom of the fridge, and it started running and cooling.
    I have also had experience with running a fridge from alternative power, ie; voltage inverters.
    This causes problems because the inverter usually only puts out 50 cycles instead of 60, and causes the motor/compressor to overheat and shut down.
    A fridge isn't real complicated, the intimidating thing is that to buy the recharge fluid, one needs a license.
     
  9. froggy
    Offline

    froggy Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2009
    Messages:
    8,309
    Thanks Received:
    1,113
    Trophy Points:
    190
    Ratings:
    +1,632
    The oil in the compressor can flow into the cooling lines when the refrigerator is tipped onto its side
     
  10. 007
    Offline

    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    38,589
    Thanks Received:
    7,920
    Trophy Points:
    1,130
    Ratings:
    +12,190
    No it can't. The cooling lines are sealed off and pressurized as a separate system. If they weren't, you'd have freon in the compressor oil even if it was standing upright. Just found that out speaking with an appliance repair man.
     

Share This Page