Doctors recommend not ripping off patients and ins compnies with tests

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by OohPooPahDoo, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. OohPooPahDoo
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    OohPooPahDoo Gold Member

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    Medical group fights against unnecessary tests

     
  2. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    How about reigning in unnecessary lawsuits, which are, at least partially, responsible for the unnecessary tests?
     
  3. OohPooPahDoo
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    OohPooPahDoo Gold Member

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    I agree. We should find a way to minimize medical errors. At 195,000 deaths a year due to medical error In Hospital Deaths from Medical Errors at 195,000 per Year USA, that's a lot of liability, and I would definitely support any measures taken to reduce medical error - and hence - medical malpractice.

    I'm sure that would add to the cost savings of around a quarter trillion dollars that the doctors in the OP figured we could save by eliminated unnecessary testing.


    Yeah, I'm sure that's it. Its not like the doctor or hospital gets paid more money for each test they do, that wouldn't have anything to do with it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012
  4. Oddball
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    That the testers get paid for the tests they do is irrelevant to the fact that the tests are being required, in order to cover asses form frivolous lawsuits.

    You don't need a doctorate to figure out that one.
     
  5. OohPooPahDoo
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    They aren't being "required" by anyone but the people doing the tests.

    it doesn't take a doctorate to figure out that - by definition - an UNNECESSARY - test will not reduce your chance of malpractice. If the test is not needed, then it provides no medical benefit to the patient, and hence does not increase the likelihood they will have a positive outcome.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012
  6. Greenbeard
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    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" -- Upton Sinclair

    These may be [medically] unnecessary for the patient, but they may be a bit more necessary for the provider's bottom line. As long as money is made off of unnecessary care, it's not going to stop. That's why payment reform--away from volume-based incentives--is so important to improving service delivery.
     
  7. kiwiman127
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    kiwiman127 Comfortably Moderate Supporting Member

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    It seems that the 9 medical societies that represent 375,000 physicians that are pushing for the elimination of these unnecessary procedures/tests have no fear of malpractice suits. Maybe, just maybe, they don't get sued as much as one has been lead to believe?

    According to Wikipedia,around 195,000 patients are killed each year by medical errors, yet lawsuits average between 15,000-19,000 each year. 73% of malpractice lawsuits involved medical error.
    Medical malpractice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Here's some interesting statistics:

    Litigation Trends Fail to Explain Rising Health Care Costs. Some in Congress
    have blamed litigation for the nationÂ’s skyrocketing health care costs. This claim has
    never been credible. The recently released NPDB data and data on liability
    insurance premiums further discredit that argument:

    o Between 2000 and 2010, Health Care Spending Rose 90 Percent While
    Medical Malpractice Payments Fell 11.9 Percent. (Both figures in unadjusted
    dollars.)

    o Malpractice Payments to Victims in 2010 Amounted to Just 0.13 of 1
    Percent of National Health Costs, the Lowest Percentage on Record
    http://www.citizen.org/documents/NPDB-2010.pdf

    So, in fact malpractice lawsuits are a very minor reason health care costs have skyrocketed.

    So much for the ever favorite talking points of blaming malpractice lawsuits for the cost of the outrageous costs of healthcare in America!

    Here we have the highest costs for healthcare in the world by almost double, yet many doctors are labeling the healthcare in the US as "mediocre". Yet we hear the US has the best healthcare in the world.

    From the this thread's linked article:

    The recommendations come at a time when American health care is undergoing far-reaching changes. No matter what the Supreme Court decides on President Barack Obama's health overhaul, employers, lawmakers, insurers and many doctors are questioning how the United States spends far more on medical care than any other economically advanced country and still produces mediocre results overall.
    Doctors question 45 common medical tests - Health - Cancer - msnbc.com

    It's time for some to wake up and smell the coffee. The US doesn't have the best healthcare in the world. The costs of malpractice lawsuits aren't even remotely close to the reason America has such high healthcare costs. So why in the hell does healthcare cost so much compared with the rest of the world?

    The reason is clear. Other countries negotiate with providers the costs of their services/products, thus their healthcare costs average half of the US. But not the US. Are we to continue this trend of letting the free market to correct itself? So far the free market has done just one thing, drive healthcare costs upwards to record levels.
     
  8. kiwiman127
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  9. Oddball
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    What utter socialist hack bullshit.

    How about eliminating Medicare/Medicaid and every other federal medical giveaway altogether, and see what effect that has on the budget picture?
     
  10. kiwiman127
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    kiwiman127 Comfortably Moderate Supporting Member

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    Oh and that'll really reduce the cost per capita of healthcare in the US? Absolutely wrong, in fact it would increase the cost of healthcare in the US per capita. I guess you like the fact that the US pays the most for healthcare by at least double compared with the other industrial countries. That not only hurts individuals and families but also businesses.

    Study: U.S. Health Care A Bad Deal

    If the global economy were a 100-yard dash, the U.S. would start 23 yards behind its closest competitors because of health care that costs too much and delivers too little, a business group says in a report to be released Thursday.

    The report from the Business Roundtable, which represents CEOs of major companies, says America's health care system has become a liability in a global economy.

    Concern about high U.S. costs has existed for years, and business executives - whose companies provide health coverage for workers - have long called for getting costs under control. Now President Obama says the costs have become unsustainable and the system must be overhauled.

    Americans spend $2.4 trillion a year on health care. The Business Roundtable report says Americans in 2006 spent $1,928 per capita on health care, at least two-and-a-half times more per person than any other advanced country.

    In a different twist, the report took those costs and factored benefits into the equation.

    It compares statistics on life expectancy, death rates and even cholesterol readings and blood pressures. The health measures are factored together with costs into a 100-point "value" scale. That hasn't been done before, the authors said.

    The results are not encouraging.

    The United States is 23 points behind five leading economic competitors: Canada, Japan, Germany, Britain and France. The five nations cover all their citizens, and though their systems differ, in each country the government plays a much larger role than in the U.S.

    The cost-benefit disparity is even wider - 46 points - when the U.S. is compared with emerging competitors: China, Brazil and India.

    "What's important is that we measure and compare actual value - not just how much we spend on health care, but the performance we get back in return," said H. Edward Hanway, CEO of the insurance company Cigna. "That's what this study does, and the results are quite eye-opening."

    Higher U.S. spending funnels away resources that could be invested elsewhere in the economy, but fails to deliver a healthier work force, the report said.

    "Spending more would not be a problem if our health scores were proportionately higher," Dr. Arnold Milstein, one of the authors of the study, said in an interview. "But what this study shows is that the U.S. is not getting higher levels of health and quality of care."

    Other countries spend less on health care and their workers are relatively healthier, the report said.

    Medical costs have long been a problem for U.S. auto companies. General Motors spends more per car on health care than it does on steel. But as more American companies face global competition, the "value gap" is being felt by more CEOs - and their hard pressed workers.

    Study: U.S. Health Care A Bad Deal - CBS News


    Isn't time to stop the fact that healthcare costs have outpaced the CPI for decades? Exactly how long can the US continue this trend?
     

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