Cuteness Alert! new kids, 7 hours old

Discussion in 'Pets' started by ozro, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. gallantwarrior
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    gallantwarrior Gold Member

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    Skye's OK. She's just not all that into raising her own food and making the tough decisions or doing the real work. Better to buy those "murdered" animals after they are packaged.
     
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  2. ozro
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    ozro Gold Member

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    i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
    the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
     
  3. gallantwarrior
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    gallantwarrior Gold Member

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    Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
    I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
     
  4. ozro
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    ozro Gold Member

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    I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
    I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
     
  5. gallantwarrior
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    gallantwarrior Gold Member

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    Funny. I was researching mules when I came across llamas. I ran a packing/hiking/camping business with my team for a while. I also had three alpacas but the seemed frail. I discovered goats and liked them so much more than llamas. When my llama herd succumbed to a situation here, I switched to goats. Mules are super cool, though, and I hope to maybe acquire one someday. They aren't that expensive here, but they are hard to come by locally. In reality, I'd like to build a vardo, get a Gypsy Vanner and see how a camping enterprise might fare here.
     
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  6. ozro
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    ozro Gold Member

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    i
    i saw a matched team of jacks sell for 3300 and a saddle jenny sell for 1100 at an auction in gallup nm two weeks ago. a six month old jack went for 700.
    at the same auction, ranch horses were going for 500 to 700.
    mules are expensive
    I bet you could do a camping/hunting trip business and make out well
     
  7. gallantwarrior
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    gallantwarrior Gold Member

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  8. ozro
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    ozro Gold Member

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    hay is 2 to 15 for a 3 string bale at the feed store here. I go to Cortez, co twice a year a pull back a 18wheeler flatbed full, so i dont pay that.
     
  9. ozro
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    ozro Gold Member

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    you really think those are fair prices?
    you won't be the first to tell me i am being too cheap
     
  10. gallantwarrior
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    gallantwarrior Gold Member

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    Maybe not fair where you are but in Alaska mules, or horses, are few and far between because it is so expensive to own one. I did take care of a friend's Arabians for a while. One stallion, three mares and a yearling. The stallion was a hoot, the mares were brood horses, and that yearling was a terror. The stallion was #1 in state but eventually the owner moved South because Alaska is a relatively closed competition and moving animals from here to there and back is expensive. Probably lots of reasons why I don't have equine stock yet. Plus, as age advances I find myself less able to deal with larger livestock.
     

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