At what point will the US take the lead?

Discussion in 'Energy' started by MaggieMae, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. MaggieMae
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    MaggieMae Reality bits

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    Clean energy projects are sprouting up everywhere but here. What's the hold up? Will federal seed money for startup projects result in Japan and other industrial nations selling their technology to us, or can we reverse that trend and once more be a leader in what IS the biggest opportunity in the world for scientists, industry, and thus JOBS?!

    [​IMG]
    Sanyo's Solar Ark, in Central Japan generates
    530,000 kilowatts of clean energy a year
     
  2. Oddball
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    Wow...People do unprofitable stuff if the gubmint gives them money to do so?

    Who knew?
     
  3. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Consumers by definitoin do not take the lead. They are followers and we are a consumer nation.
     
  4. Oddball
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    Consumers take the lead when you give them a half reason, that resonates with them, to consume.

    Give up the shift to the anti-consumer refrain...You're flailing bigtime at it.
     
  5. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Sez you. Should I be impressed?
     
  6. Oddball
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    Well, if you enjoy coming off as an elitist snob, as every anti-consumerist I've ever encountered does, feel free to carry on.
     
  7. MaggieMae
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    Unprofitable? Hardly. Clean energy investments are the future, stymied only by lack of momentum created by the overall lousy economy and, of course, those who oppose any creative alternatives for whatever weird reason, such as yours.

    Reports - Clean Edge - Clean Energy Trends 2009

    Clean Edge, which has been tracking the growth of clean-tech markets for nearly a decade, reports that global revenues for solar photovoltaics, wind power, and biofuels expanded from $75.8 billion in 2007 to $115.9 billion in 2008. For the first time, one sector alone, wind, had revenues exceeding $50 billion. New global investments in energy technologies—including venture capital, project finance, public markets, and research and development—expanded by 4.7 percent from $148.4 billion in 2007 to $155.4 billion in 2008, according to research firm New Energy Finance.

    Severely tightened credit markets also began to take their toll. In late 2008 and early 2009, the extent of constrained credit became apparent, with a range of clean-energy companies delaying plans, laying off staff, or scuttling projects entirely. While we expect to see continued growth for the sector in the mid- to long-term, we believe 2009 will be a year of refocus, consolidation, or retrenchment for many firms. At the same time, new government spending, regulation, and policies should help the sector weather the current economic crisis better than most other sectors. On balance, we believe clean energy and energy intelligence will be seen as a means to help economies around the world pull out of the current economic malaise.


    We also need retraining of American talent lost to obsolete industries. Tell me, Dud, how does the average "consumer" who has been laid off or downsized and struggling just to put food on the table find the time and money for such retraining?
     
  8. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Ok, I'm off to Wally world.
     
  9. Oddball
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    If they were profitable, private businesses would have investors lined up for miles with capital for their projects. It's been the same story since at least the '70s, and one not very likely to change anytime soon.

    Besides that, if the industry is going to be profitable in America, you have armies of know-nothing CAVEie environmentalist wackaloons to get past....A longshot of a bet, if there ever was one.
     
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  10. MaggieMae
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    You're wrong about that, too. There are wind farms all across the country already, and "wackos" have only mildly objected to the fact that they might interfere with flight patterns of birds. Environmentalists rightly complain about drilling for oil on a massive level interrupting the migration of caribu. So for that, they're considered "wackos" by "wackos," while the majority of earth-conscious people recognize the tradeoff.

    Green revolution unites labor and environmentalists
     

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