Arizona lashes out at illegal immigration

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by LilOlLady, May 16, 2010.

  1. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    Arizona lashes out at illegal immigration
    By Mark K. Matthews, Stateline.org Staff Writer
    August 2005

    PHOENIX -- Arizona is a state in turmoil, inundated by at least a half million illegal immigrants and torn apart by ways to handle these new residents.
    Homemade street signs tell day laborers to keep moving. State politicians who want to curtail illegal immigration are riding a wave of public support. And radio call-in shows -- never a bastion of civility -- debate the issue almost daily, in both English and Español.
    Public discontent with the situation has boiled over into state policy, leading voters and lawmakers to pass some of the most hardline anti-illegal immigrant laws in the country.
    "It brings out the worst in a lot of us," said state Rep. Steve Gallardo (D).
    In May, Hispanic workers staged a one-day strike to protest the growing anti-immigrant sentiment. Hispanic leaders are calling for a nationwide boycott of Arizona, a tactic employed by civil rights groups more than a decade ago after the state refused to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. with a holiday.
    That boycott cost Arizona the chance to host the 1993 Super Bowl.
    This is not a new conflict. Tensions have built for years over the influx of undocumented workers to this desert state, now the busiest illegal gateway on the Mexican border.
    &&Federal border officials arrested nearly 500,000 people trying to enter the state between last October and July. In April, the “Minuteman Project,” a self-appointed militia, began patrolling the Arizona-Mexico border. And in mid-August, Gov. Janet Napolitano (D) took the unusual step of declaring a state of emergency. The move frees up government money to boost law enforcement along the border.
    According to the Pew Hispanic Center, which like Stateline.org is funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts, the number of illegal immigrants in Arizona has more than quadrupled since 1996 -- from 115,000 then to about 500,000 now. By comparison, the number of illegal immigrants in the United States roughly doubled, jumping from about 5 million in 1996 to about 11 million today.
    The upsurge of illegal immigrants in Arizona -- on top of an economic boom that caused the state’s population to increase more than 12 percent to almost 6 million since 2000 -- is severely straining prisons, schools, hospitals and law enforcement.
    Some experts believe the conflict offers a glimpse into the future of American politics. Politicians in at least 11 states are pushing ballot initiative proposals similar to Arizona's ban on state services, and anti-illegal immigration measures increasingly are dividing statehouses from North Carolina to California.
    Arizona’s turning point came last November when it became the first state since California in 1994 to adopt a ballot initiative, Proposition 200, that barred social services to illegal immigrants.
    The measure, which passed with 55.6 percent of the vote despite opposition from both Democratic and Republican leaders, also makes it a crime for public employees to fail to report undocumented immigrants seeking benefits, and requires proof of citizenship to register to vote.
    "(Illegal immigrants) can't come to America and get free stuff. It's just wrong. You've got to take their benefits away,” said Rep. Russell Pearce (R), who led the Prop 200 drive.
    Unlike California’s initiative, Arizona's Prop 200 has held up in court. In early August, a federal appeals court rejected a lawsuit aimed at overturning it. Further legal action is expected.
    Prop 200 has done little to change the lives of illegal immigrants, who cannot legally vote anyway and were eligible only for limited benefits. But its passage galvanized conservative state lawmakers to introduce additional punitive measures during this year’s session of the Legislature.
    Several measures passed, were signed into law by the governor and went into effect Aug. 12.
    Arizona police officers, as well as federal border patrol officers, now can arrest people suspected of smuggling illegal immigrants into the United States. They also cam seize vehicles driven by illegal immigrants that are involved in an accident.
    State judges can lengthen a felony sentence if the person convicted has violated federal immigration law, and city and county officials are barred from spending on migrant work centers, which illegal immigrants often use to find employment.
    Napolitano vetoed proposals to designate English as the official state language and build a prison in Mexico for illegal immigrants.
    In 2006, Arizona voters will consider changing the state Constitution to deny bail to illegal immigrants arrested for serious crimes. GOP lawmakers are considering going around Napolitano to revive the English-only proposal and put it on the ballot, too, as well as another initiative that would give local police the power to arrest illegal immigrants.
    Carlos Morales, who illegally immigrated from Mexico about 18 months ago, said in an interview at a work center in northern Phoenix that the law that ends funding to work centers is typical of politics in the aftermath of Prop 200.
    "After Proposition 200, it seems everything is against the migrant. It's racist. Everything seems to be blamed on the migrant," Morales said in Spanish through a translator.
    Although undocumented workers help provide labor for Arizona’s booming construction business, they also impose costs. Jim Dickson, who runs a hospital five miles from the Mexican border, says emergency room care for illegal immigrants has risen from $30,000 to more than $350,000 in only four years.
    "We're in a war down here to preserve the health system," Dickson told Stateline.org.
    Law enforcement officials and lawmakers such as Pearce also contend that crime follows illegal immigrants across the border. The state prison system spent $77 million last year detaining more than 4,000 illegal immigrants.
    Compounding the tension, Arizona residents can't even agree on what to call those who illegally cross the border; the gamut runs from the conservative label "illegal aliens" to the liberal "undocumented workers."
    To some, much of the conflict is ethnic: Hispanics in 2003 comprised over 27 percent of Arizona’s population. Of the 449,000 new residents added between 2000 and 2003, more than 53 percent were Hispanic. Census figures do not differentiate between legal and illegal residents.
    State Sen. Karen Johnson (R) sees a cultural struggle, too. "The culture of the United States is being destroyed," she said. "The illegals don't want to be a part of American culture. They want to bring their Mexican-Hispanic culture here."
    As the number of Hispanics living in the state has grown, so has the number of Hispanic state legislators, who now hold 14 of the 90 seats in the Statehouse.
    Rodolfo Espino of Arizona State University, who specializes in political behavior and minority politics, said this increased political power may explain some of the current anti-immigration sentiment in Arizona. The white establishment is in danger of losing control, he said.
    But the sentiment driving Arizona’s backlash can be found even within the Hispanic community. Prop 200 exit polls showed that 47 percent of Hispanics who voted supported the measure.
    Rita Montanez, a mother of three who lives in Mesa, Ariz., worries about the effects of illegal immigration on her ability to get health care.
    "I'm Mexican-American, and I just believe we are overstretched because of all the immigration," Montanez said. She added that "closing the border" might be the only solution to the problem.
    Tomorrow: A profile of Russell Pearce, leader of Arizona's anti-illegal immigration movement.

    Send your comments on this story to letters@stateline.org. Selected reader feedback will be posted in the Letters to the editor section.
    Contact Mark K. Matthews at mmatthews@stateline.org.
     
  2. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    Arizona: Illegal alien crime wave continues

    April, 2010
    Law Enforcement Examiner
    Jim Kouri


    While politicians such as President Barack Obama denigrate the government of Arizona and "activists" attempt to punish that state's citizens, these so-called social justice paragons ignore the fact that the U.S. is Mexico's de facto penal colony.

    Complex problems are associated with illegal aliens who commit crimes. Criminal aliens tend to be drug-oriented and violent, often preying on members of their own cultures. If deported, they frequently use new names to reenter the United States and establish residence in different cities.

    Furthermore, aliens do not confine their criminal activities to border cities -- communities throughout this country are experiencing increasing alien involvement in drug importation and distribution, weapons smuggling, and violence against persons and property.

    The escalation in alien crime has placed added demands on state and local law enforcement personnel. Effective identification of aliens involved in crime requires familiarity with fraudulent documentation. Proper arrest procedures must be carried out, and complex notification and reporting requirements must be satisfied; otherwise, dangerous aliens can escape prosecution and deportation.

    Handling the myriad problems associated with alien crimes is often beyond the capabilities of local police departments.

    Some illegal aliens in the United States have been arrested and incarcerated in federal and state prisons and local jails, adding to already overcrowded prisons and jails. On April 7, 2007, the US Justice Department issued a report on criminal aliens that were incarcerated in federal and state prisons and local jails.

    In the population study of 55,322 illegal aliens, researchers found that they were arrested at least a total of 459,614 times, averaging about 8 arrests per illegal alien. Nearly all had more than 1 arrest. Thirty-eight percent (about 21,000) had between 2 and 5 arrests, 32 percent (about 18,000) had between 6 and 10 arrests, and 26 percent (about 15,000) had 11 or more arrests. Most of the arrests occurred after 1990.
    They were arrested for a total of about 700,000 criminal offenses, averaging about 13 offenses per illegal alien. One arrest incident may include multiple offenses, a fact that explains why there are nearly one and half times more offenses than arrests. Almost all of these illegal aliens were arrested for more than 1 offense. Slightly more than half of the 55,322 illegal aliens had between 2 and 10 offenses.

    CRIMINAL HISTORY

    More than two-thirds of the defendants charged with an immigration offense were identified as having been previously arrested. Thirty-six percent had been arrested on at least 5 prior occasions; 22%, 2 to 4 times; and 12%,1 time.

    Sixty-one percent of those defendants had been convicted at least once; 18%, 5 or more times; 26%, 2 to 4 times; and 17%, 1 time. Of those charged, 49% had previously been convicted of a felony: 20% of a drug offense; 18%, a violent offense; and 11%, other felony offenses.

    Twelve percent had previously been convicted of a misdemeanor.

    Defendants charged with unlawful reentry had the most extensive criminal histories. Nine in ten had been previously arrested. Of those with a prior arrest, half had been arrested on at least 5 prior occasions.

    Fifty-six percent of those charged with a reentry offense had previously been convicted of a violent or drug-related felony. By contrast, under half of those charged with alien smuggling, a third of those charged with unlawful entry, and just over a quarter those charged with misuse of visas and other charges had previously been arrested. The criminal histories of these defendants were generally less extensive: more than 70% had been previously arrested fewer than 5 times.

    Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he's a columnist for The Examiner (examiner.com) and New Media Alliance (thenma.org). In addition, he's a blogger for the Cheyenne, Wyoming Fox News Radio affiliate KGAB (Sandals Splash Page). Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty.
     
  3. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    This is the reason Arizona had to act. Illegal immigration has destroyed the state. I cannot understand why Obama's and liberals cannot see it. Because it is not on Penn Ave or Sedona AZ,
     
  4. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    How many flop houses on Penn, ave? How many Anchor babies go to school with Obama's girls. How much grafitti is on the white house fence? How many drive by's on Penn Ave? How many illegal aliens are cutting the white house lawn? Have Obama's limo been burglerized?
     
  5. Zona
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    Zona A guy in ariZONA

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    Greatest thread ever.
     
  6. SW2SILVER
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    SW2SILVER BANNED

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    Love ya, lil o' lady. Grand Dame of the board. Of course, all those illegal aliens make buku bucks for Mexico, man, they must be a major source of revenue for Mexico. Sending god knows ( look it up) millions of dollars across the border, lets face it, that is why the Mexican government supports illegal immigration. It's not about human rights , and it never was.
     
  7. Paul_AZ
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    Paul_AZ Rookie

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    Illegal immigration from Mexico to the US and the money wired back home could be Mexico's largest revenue source now.

    I wonder if that's what pushed Carlos Slim over the top to push Bill Gates out of Forbes Richest Man in the World Title for 2010. Carlos Slim does own all the communications in Mexico. I bet he is getting a sweet cut of the BILLIONS illegals wire home every year. He is one slick wheeler dealer working with one of the most corrupt governments in the world. These guys make the late Saddam look like a candy store shoplifter. Carlos Slim Helú, is 3/4 Lebanese and 1/4 Hispanic, born in Mexico. Look him up if you haven't it's sort of an interesting story.
     
  8. California Girl
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    California Girl BANNED

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    I'm interested to know why some posters can break the rules of copyright and others get hammered for it.
     
  9. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    Carlos Sim = MONOPOLY! Thus the reason why he ended up as one of the richest man in the world. Wonder how charitable HE is????
     

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