America's Egyptian Allies

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by NATO AIR, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    The Bush Admin's policy is bankrupt. Needless to say, despite its outward trappings of "power", the Egyptian regime is more brittle and endangered than ever before. A revolution led by the Muslim Brotherhood and other sects is certainly not out of the question in the near to mid future.

    http://www.voanews.com/english/NewsAnalysis/2007-03-29-voa48.cfm
     
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  2. NATO AIR
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    Actually, I apologize. Muslim Brotherhood is POTENTIALLY bad enough (we really don't know what they are like in power, you can't use Hamas as an example because of the disconnectivity America and Israel gave to them allowing them a perfect excuse for failure), but these guys are definitely the "worst-case" scenario:

    http://jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2370234

    Hizb-ut-Tahrir

    These mofos are the "real deal":


    HT's long-term strategy is to take over countries by progressively winning over the elite. More pressing, however, is the threat posed by the "conveyor belt" effect of HT [7]. The conveyor belt theory says that HT members often leave the group much more radicalized than when they joined and that they might then consequently commit terrorist acts [8]. In Europe and Central Asia, this theory is supported by growing evidence that a larger flow of people through HT leads to an increased number of attacks against Western targets and non-Islamic governments by former HT members. Although it is presently impossible to fully document this trend in the Arab world, it seems logical that the conveyor belt theory would apply there just as it does elsewhere.

    In addition, HT splinter groups tend to be Salafi-Jihadi movements led by people dissatisfied with HT's gradualist approach and its refusal to alter its opposition to political violence. For example, in the UK, a senior leader, the Syrian-born Omar Bakri Muhammad, quit HT to establish al-Muhajiroun, which advocated violent attacks against British, U.S. and Israeli targets around the world. Several peripheral members of al-Muhajiroun later carried out jihadi attacks, while Bakri now lives in Lebanon where he is believed to be involved in radical Islamic politics among Palestinian refugees (particularly in the Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp) and among Lebanese Sunnis in the Tripoli region [9].
     

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