81-year old ex Nazi loses citizenship

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by acludem, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. acludem
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    acludem VIP Member

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    Does anyone else have a problem with this? The guy is 81 years old, he's been in the country for over fifty years, what is the point of revoking his citizenship? IMHO, unless they can prove he participated in actually killing or harming anyone, they should leave him the hell alone.

    acludem
    ===================================
    Ex-Nazi guard's citizenship revoked



    CAMDEN, New Jersey (AP) -- A federal judge has revoked the citizenship of a retired blueberry farmer because of his past as a Nazi guard during World War II.

    The Justice Department said Andrew Kuras, 81, of Mays Landing, served as a guard at three concentration camps in the 1940s.

    Officials said Kuras concealed his Nazi past when he entered the United States in 1951 and when he became a citizen 11 years later.

    The judge entered the court order Tuesday.

    "No one who assisted the Nazi regime in its persecution of innocent civilians is entitled to the privilege of United States citizenship," prosecutor Christopher A. Wray said in a statement Wednesday.

    In a 2002 interview with the Press of Atlantic City, Kuras said he did not kill or hurt anyone and that he did not remember specific duties he had as a guard.

    A Justice Department spokesman said the government had not decided whether to try to have Kuras deported.

    Calls placed Wednesday to the office of Kuras' lawyer were not answered.


    http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/04/15/nazi.guard.ap/index.html
     
  2. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    I have no problem with this whatsoever. He should have been interrogated at the end of ww2 like all the others. If he had been cleared, then fine he could stay. If not, try him like the rest.
     
  3. NewGuy
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    Agreed.
     
  4. acludem
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    acludem VIP Member

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    So you support guilt by association? Just because someone served in the German army during World War II doesn't mean they were actively participating in the holocaust. If it can be proven that he was participating in the killing of jews or others in concentration camps than fine, otherwise leave the old guy alone.

    acludem
     
  5. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    did I say he was guilty? no, I said he should have been interrogated along with the others. only THEN should he have been tried, provided they were able to prove he was involved.

    that didn't happen though, he snuck into this country trying to leave his nazi past behind and it finally caught up to him.
     
  6. acludem
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    acludem VIP Member

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    I don't know if he's guilty. No one seems to know exactly what he did other than serve as a guard, perhaps at a concentration camp. The man in question insists he never hurt or killed anyone, but that he couldn't remember what his specific duties were.

    I still think it's a bit ridiculous to go after a bunch of old people for being guards in the 1940s. I stand by what I said before...unless the U.S. Government can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he actually participated in killing or harming people during the war they should leave him alone.

    acludem
     
  7. Aquarian
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    Aquarian Member

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    there is precedent, at least a recent example:
    http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1075219844830

    I suspect we are far short of details in this case such as evidence that he did or did not hurt anyone during his time as a guard. according to the other case the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 barred people who persecuted others because of their race, religion or national origin from receiving visas, which would bring into question whether citizenship gained without full disclosure of their activities under the nazi's was valid. The cnn article doesn't give any details of the proceedings that led to the judges decision.

    On the other hand, and obviously setting the law aside for purposes of discussion, 51 years in the country ought to count for something, a blueberry farmer, retired. how was he viewed in his community? what kind of regrets does he have? I'm one of those who believes in the possibility of rehabilitation, and how he lived his life here should impact his treatment by the justice system. not to say that there should be no punishment, including revoking his citizenship, deporting him to germany for trial, or what not, just that it's not so cut and dried in my eyes.

    edit: doh, took too long typing again...
     
  8. acludem
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    acludem VIP Member

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    It may be that they'll revoke his citizenship but not try and deport him. I absolutely believe that 51 years of good should outweight 2 years of bad (assuming the government can prove he did anything other than stand guard).

    acludem
     
  9. Quad
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    there's a difference between joining the german army and serving the fatherland in the SS.

    the large majority of those that served in the SS do not have any remorse or regret of their participation in the systematic homocide of non-aryans.

    can you hold a 20 year old accountable for joining the SS at the height of the third reich ?
     
  10. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    He should be extradited to Israel for them to determine his culpability, if any, in the slaughter of millions of human beings.

    If he is guilty, he should be shot.
     

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