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Why the Gulf states need to forge their own Iran policy

Disir

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Mohammad Jawad Zarif posted a video to commemorate the 42nd anniversary of the Iranian Revolution in which he said, in English, that seven US presidents had banked on the collapse of Iran but the revolution had survived, and called on Iran’s Arab neighbors to cooperate because they were bound by geography to remain “neighbors for ever.”

The Iranian foreign minister’s tone exuded confidence, defiance even, which was probably reinforced by the arrival of Joe Biden in the White House. Biden made it clear during his campaign that he intends to return to the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the Iran nuclear deal, an agreement that Arab Gulf countries loathe. His predecessor, Donald Trump, withdrew the US from the deal in 2018.

However, Arab Gulf states have yet to come up with a coherent and cohesive policy in response to the new realities dictated by the shift in American policies under Biden.

The appointment of Robert Malley as the US envoy for Iran put the Gulf states and Israel on guard, as he is perceived as pro-Iran. Just before he was appointed, the think tank he was heading, the International Crisis Group (ICG), published a policy paper that included a step-by-step plan for a US return to the nuclear deal. It suggested a timetable be set by the JCPOA joint committee and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to ensure that a return to compliance with the JCPOA happens in parallel with sanctions relief.

This is an opinion piece but it is interesting.
 

surada

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Mohammad Jawad Zarif posted a video to commemorate the 42nd anniversary of the Iranian Revolution in which he said, in English, that seven US presidents had banked on the collapse of Iran but the revolution had survived, and called on Iran’s Arab neighbors to cooperate because they were bound by geography to remain “neighbors for ever.”

The Iranian foreign minister’s tone exuded confidence, defiance even, which was probably reinforced by the arrival of Joe Biden in the White House. Biden made it clear during his campaign that he intends to return to the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the Iran nuclear deal, an agreement that Arab Gulf countries loathe. His predecessor, Donald Trump, withdrew the US from the deal in 2018.

However, Arab Gulf states have yet to come up with a coherent and cohesive policy in response to the new realities dictated by the shift in American policies under Biden.

The appointment of Robert Malley as the US envoy for Iran put the Gulf states and Israel on guard, as he is perceived as pro-Iran. Just before he was appointed, the think tank he was heading, the International Crisis Group (ICG), published a policy paper that included a step-by-step plan for a US return to the nuclear deal. It suggested a timetable be set by the JCPOA joint committee and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to ensure that a return to compliance with the JCPOA happens in parallel with sanctions relief.

This is an opinion piece but it is interesting.

Well, the Iranians have invited the IAEA inspectors in so that sort of creates a problem for the Israelis .
 

ESay

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Well, the Iranians have invited the IAEA inspectors in so that sort of creates a problem for the Israelis .
That won't enough it seems. Iran should make some concessions on its missile program.
 

surada

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That won't enough it seems. Iran should make some concessions on its missile program.

I can't say now, but for many years all the Iranians wanted was nuclear power to expand their electrical grid.

The US was training their technicians.
 

ESay

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I can't say now, but for many years all the Iranians wanted was nuclear power to expand their electrical grid.

The US was training their technicians.
Other countries should admit that Iran has a right to develop nuclear power plants, as all other countries do.

And it seems that over the time, Iran will become so called 'threshold' country, which means it has the means to produce an atomic weapon, but won't produce and have this weapon. And this the reality that should be taken in consideration.
 

surada

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Other countries should admit that Iran has a right to develop nuclear power plants, as all other countries do.

And it seems that over the time, Iran will become so called 'threshold' country, which means it has the means to produce an atomic weapon, but won't produce and have this weapon. And this the reality that should be taken in consideration.

Pakistan and India have nuclear weapons aimed at each other so that's a deterrent.
 

ESay

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Pakistan and India have nuclear weapons aimed at each other so that's a deterrent.
So, what do you propose? To allow Iran and Saudi Arabia having nuclear weapons aimed at one another?
 

surada

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So, what do you propose? To allow Iran and Saudi Arabia having nuclear weapons aimed at one another?


That's the problem. The Saudi don't want nuclear weapons. They have opposed nuclear weapons for over 60 years.

Think about what a waste of money nukes are.
 

ESay

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That's the problem. The Saudi don't want nuclear weapons. They have opposed nuclear weapons for over 60 years.

Think about what a waste of money nukes are.
Basically, they don't need nukes. And the US policy should be to prevent Iran from getting it also. A new deal should be reached, with concessions from both sides.
 

surada

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Basically, they don't need nukes. And the US policy should be to prevent Iran from getting it also. A new deal should be reached, with concessions from both sides.

The US would have to insure Iran's security ... The Saudis aren't going to attack Iran..
 

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