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Why did Obama kill funding for hydrogen cars? / Meet the next generation ..

jon_berzerk

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I never knew Obama killed funding for hydrogen R&D and instead of funded ancient 180 year old electric battery cars..why did he do that? Follow the money I guess another Bell vs telsa game...A/C vs D/C



Meanwhile the Japanese is taking over ..


http://www.popularmechanics.com/car...867/hydrogen-cars-toyota-murai-honda-clarity/



Meet the Next Generation of the Hydrogen Car
Driving Toyota's and Honda's next-gen fuel-cells.



A simple chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car, producing only water, not exhaust fumes." That was George W. Bush in 2003, proposing $1.2 billion to research fuel-cell automobiles. Six years later, President Obama killed that funding





Meanwhile, over in Japan, Toyota and Honda have been at work, spending millions in R&D to make the new hydrogen-powered Mirai and Clarity. It's more reasonable than it sounds. Fuel-cell cars are as appealing now as they were during Bush's first term. It's still the only way to get zero-emissions driving with gasoline convenience—pull up to the pump, wait five minutes, and be on your way. But with less than 40 public hydrogen pumps in the United States, the only Mirai and Clarity customers will be coastal and in big cities. At least for now. We drove the Mirai in Los Angeles and the Clarity in New York, two places promising to build more hydrogen stations in the next two years, to assess both cars' present-day drivability.

HONDA CLARITY
gallery-1498485400-toyota2.jpg

Honda
The sensible crossover-hatchback roofline, the upright driving posture, seating for five adults. It all makes you think: Your Uber is now arriving. Yes, a driver could press the Clarity's Sport mode button and have fun with the on ramps. The steering and especially the brakes feel as natural as any of Honda's excellent OPEC-powered models. But at 4,000-plus pounds and with a zero-to-60 we'd estimate near double digits, you don't get gasoline thrills.

The Clarity comes in one trim option that's loaded with tech like lane-departure warning and automatic braking. Wrapped in suede made from recycled plastic, the digital dash has a ball that shrinks and expands, coaching you toward efficient driving. As long as performance isn't a priority, all that adds up to a hell of a lot of civility for the price, which is a loss-leader low. You can't buy a Clarity—Honda says MSRP would hit near $60,000. You lease it for about $3,000 down and $369 a month. Along with the car, Honda gives you a $15,000 credit card to spend on hydrogen fill-ups. And 21 days of petroleum-car rentals for longer trips. And Californians get a $5,000 rebate. And an HOV sticker. Pick up a few weekend driving shifts and going fuel-cell is cheaper than an iPhone upgrade.—Alexander George

Base price: $369 per month (lease only)

Range: 366 miles

The rear hydrogen tanks are covered in carbon fiber and aluminum to protect against punctures.

TOYOTA MIRAI
gallery-1498485772-toyota1.jpg

Toyota Murai
Driving north out of Los Angeles, I notice the battery gauge tick down a few bars and experience the familiar twinge of range anxiety. Then, the battery display pulls a stunt I've never seen in an electric car, climbing back up to near full. The car charged itself. So cool.

What really happened is that the Mirai's fuel cells sent over some electricity to top off the nickel-metal-hydride battery that powers the 153-hp drive motor. Range concerns alleviated, I gun the little Toyota toward an off ramp, its fuel cells ramping up with a sound that's like someone mowing a lawn two blocks over. Acceleration is reminiscent of a small diesel with excellent torque, good fun once you know how to use it. But the Mirai is a modest setup. Toyota is already demonstrating the high-power possibilities with a heavy-duty truck. The twin fuel cells in that sucker make 670 horsepower and 1,325 lb-ft of torque. Imagine that in a Camry.

gallery-1498485890-toyota-top.jpg

The fuel cell is under the hood, and the 245-volt battery sits beneath the seats, for a low center of gravity.

A few dozen miles later, I look in the rearview mirror to see . . . another Mirai. Is that a glimpse into the future? Fuel cells obviously work. But the question is the same now as it was a decade ago, before the EV takeover—whether something just over the horizon might work even better.—Ezra Dyer

Base price: $57,500

Range: 312 miles





.

Where do you want to get the hydrogen to fuel these cars?
from a stored source like ammonia or water

Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?

water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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I never knew Obama killed funding for hydrogen R&D and instead of funded ancient 180 year old electric battery cars..why did he do that? Follow the money I guess another Bell vs telsa game...A/C vs D/C



Meanwhile the Japanese is taking over ..


http://www.popularmechanics.com/car...867/hydrogen-cars-toyota-murai-honda-clarity/



Meet the Next Generation of the Hydrogen Car
Driving Toyota's and Honda's next-gen fuel-cells.



A simple chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car, producing only water, not exhaust fumes." That was George W. Bush in 2003, proposing $1.2 billion to research fuel-cell automobiles. Six years later, President Obama killed that funding





Meanwhile, over in Japan, Toyota and Honda have been at work, spending millions in R&D to make the new hydrogen-powered Mirai and Clarity. It's more reasonable than it sounds. Fuel-cell cars are as appealing now as they were during Bush's first term. It's still the only way to get zero-emissions driving with gasoline convenience—pull up to the pump, wait five minutes, and be on your way. But with less than 40 public hydrogen pumps in the United States, the only Mirai and Clarity customers will be coastal and in big cities. At least for now. We drove the Mirai in Los Angeles and the Clarity in New York, two places promising to build more hydrogen stations in the next two years, to assess both cars' present-day drivability.

HONDA CLARITY
gallery-1498485400-toyota2.jpg

Honda
The sensible crossover-hatchback roofline, the upright driving posture, seating for five adults. It all makes you think: Your Uber is now arriving. Yes, a driver could press the Clarity's Sport mode button and have fun with the on ramps. The steering and especially the brakes feel as natural as any of Honda's excellent OPEC-powered models. But at 4,000-plus pounds and with a zero-to-60 we'd estimate near double digits, you don't get gasoline thrills.

The Clarity comes in one trim option that's loaded with tech like lane-departure warning and automatic braking. Wrapped in suede made from recycled plastic, the digital dash has a ball that shrinks and expands, coaching you toward efficient driving. As long as performance isn't a priority, all that adds up to a hell of a lot of civility for the price, which is a loss-leader low. You can't buy a Clarity—Honda says MSRP would hit near $60,000. You lease it for about $3,000 down and $369 a month. Along with the car, Honda gives you a $15,000 credit card to spend on hydrogen fill-ups. And 21 days of petroleum-car rentals for longer trips. And Californians get a $5,000 rebate. And an HOV sticker. Pick up a few weekend driving shifts and going fuel-cell is cheaper than an iPhone upgrade.—Alexander George

Base price: $369 per month (lease only)

Range: 366 miles

The rear hydrogen tanks are covered in carbon fiber and aluminum to protect against punctures.

TOYOTA MIRAI
gallery-1498485772-toyota1.jpg

Toyota Murai
Driving north out of Los Angeles, I notice the battery gauge tick down a few bars and experience the familiar twinge of range anxiety. Then, the battery display pulls a stunt I've never seen in an electric car, climbing back up to near full. The car charged itself. So cool.

What really happened is that the Mirai's fuel cells sent over some electricity to top off the nickel-metal-hydride battery that powers the 153-hp drive motor. Range concerns alleviated, I gun the little Toyota toward an off ramp, its fuel cells ramping up with a sound that's like someone mowing a lawn two blocks over. Acceleration is reminiscent of a small diesel with excellent torque, good fun once you know how to use it. But the Mirai is a modest setup. Toyota is already demonstrating the high-power possibilities with a heavy-duty truck. The twin fuel cells in that sucker make 670 horsepower and 1,325 lb-ft of torque. Imagine that in a Camry.

gallery-1498485890-toyota-top.jpg

The fuel cell is under the hood, and the 245-volt battery sits beneath the seats, for a low center of gravity.

A few dozen miles later, I look in the rearview mirror to see . . . another Mirai. Is that a glimpse into the future? Fuel cells obviously work. But the question is the same now as it was a decade ago, before the EV takeover—whether something just over the horizon might work even better.—Ezra Dyer

Base price: $57,500

Range: 312 miles





.

Where do you want to get the hydrogen to fuel these cars?

That's always been my question, thank you. You can't just mine or drill for hydrogen. What is the cost in dollars and energy spent to produce hydrogen? What is the cost in infrastructure to distribute the hydrogen once it is produced? Seems even more monumental than the challenges with EV's IMO.

Hydrogen is not a fuel. It is an energy transfer medium. Making hydrogen, storing it, transporting it to fueling station, and the dangers associated with its flammability makes it too expensive to be economically viable.


that is why you store the hydrogen in substances like ammonia


http://electricauto.com/_pdfs/Portland Paper B.pdf

Conclusions
By using materials which are more or less commercially available it is possible to construct a hydrogen generating plant using ammonia as fuel, thus eliminating the problems of hydrogen storage and transport. At the high cracking efficiency of the developed catalyst the ammonia cracker could be constructed at modest mass and volume. The system using ammonia feedstock is technically simple, no recycle loops are required. Especially with alkaline fuel cells high efficiency systems are possible as small amounts of ammonia in the cracked gas are permitted to enter the fuel cell and can be burned in an anode off-gas heated cracker device. 1. Metkemeijer, R., Achard,P., „Comparison of ammonia and

Yeah, because ammonia is so much safer! Not!

If a hydrogen tank leaks, and does not explode, great!

If an ammonia tank leaks, you are probably dead anyway!
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Where do you want to get the hydrogen to fuel these cars?
from a stored source like ammonia or water

Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?

water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec

Just like fusion power! Pipe dreams!
 

jon_berzerk

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from a stored source like ammonia or water

Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?

water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec

Just like fusion power! Pipe dreams!


no not really

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.13182/FST04-A423?journalCode=ufst20
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?

water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec

Just like fusion power! Pipe dreams!


no not really

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.13182/FST04-A423?journalCode=ufst20

It is NOT easy! The energy losses are HUGE!
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Did you know submarines were once powered by hydrogen peroxide? Great idea until someone realized that the stuff you use in your bathroom is diluted almost to nothing.

Hydrogen peroxide makes one hell of a big BOOM!
 

jon_berzerk

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Did you know submarines were once powered by hydrogen peroxide? Great idea until someone realized that the stuff you use in your bathroom is diluted almost to nothing.

Hydrogen peroxide makes one hell of a big BOOM!


yes of course if dont handle it correctly

i work frequently with h202 36 % or higher
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Did you know submarines were once powered by hydrogen peroxide? Great idea until someone realized that the stuff you use in your bathroom is diluted almost to nothing.

Hydrogen peroxide makes one hell of a big BOOM!


yes of course if dont handle it correctly

i work frequently with h202 36 % or higher

So why don't we use it as a car fuel? You have already answered that question.
 

jon_berzerk

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Did you know submarines were once powered by hydrogen peroxide? Great idea until someone realized that the stuff you use in your bathroom is diluted almost to nothing.

Hydrogen peroxide makes one hell of a big BOOM!


yes of course if dont handle it correctly

i work frequently with h202 36 % or higher

So why don't we use it as a car fuel? You have already answered that question.

why would i

you are just being obtuse

and it is boring
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Did you know submarines were once powered by hydrogen peroxide? Great idea until someone realized that the stuff you use in your bathroom is diluted almost to nothing.

Hydrogen peroxide makes one hell of a big BOOM!


yes of course if dont handle it correctly

i work frequently with h202 36 % or higher

So why don't we use it as a car fuel? You have already answered that question.

why would i

you are just being obtuse

and it is boring

This entire thread is boring because everyone is trying to outdo each other on how ignorant they are on this topic!
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?

water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec

Just like fusion power! Pipe dreams!


no not really

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.13182/FST04-A423?journalCode=ufst20

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

There are lots of ways to waste energy, why do we want to use this one for our cars?
 

jon_berzerk

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water?
the Japanese have a membrane that separates hydrogen and oxygen

been around for sometime

i look around to see if i can find it

they had a educational video

in the demonstration they used all sorts of water

otherwise the old conventional method has been

the use of electricity but it can be rather dangerous

and can tend to become a bomb --LOL

A membrane? That's why Japan fuels all of their millions of cars on hydrogen. Wait! They don't? Why not?


indeed they are still developing the tec

Just like fusion power! Pipe dreams!


no not really

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.13182/FST04-A423?journalCode=ufst20

for years hydrogen can be easily extracted from water though electrolysis

There are lots of ways to waste energy, why do we want to use this one for our cars?


personally i wouldnt choose that method
 

BuckToothMoron

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I never knew Obama killed funding for hydrogen R&D and instead of funded ancient 180 year old electric battery cars..why did he do that? Follow the money I guess another Bell vs telsa game...A/C vs D/C



Meanwhile the Japanese is taking over ..


http://www.popularmechanics.com/car...867/hydrogen-cars-toyota-murai-honda-clarity/



Meet the Next Generation of the Hydrogen Car
Driving Toyota's and Honda's next-gen fuel-cells.



A simple chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car, producing only water, not exhaust fumes." That was George W. Bush in 2003, proposing $1.2 billion to research fuel-cell automobiles. Six years later, President Obama killed that funding





Meanwhile, over in Japan, Toyota and Honda have been at work, spending millions in R&D to make the new hydrogen-powered Mirai and Clarity. It's more reasonable than it sounds. Fuel-cell cars are as appealing now as they were during Bush's first term. It's still the only way to get zero-emissions driving with gasoline convenience—pull up to the pump, wait five minutes, and be on your way. But with less than 40 public hydrogen pumps in the United States, the only Mirai and Clarity customers will be coastal and in big cities. At least for now. We drove the Mirai in Los Angeles and the Clarity in New York, two places promising to build more hydrogen stations in the next two years, to assess both cars' present-day drivability.

HONDA CLARITY
gallery-1498485400-toyota2.jpg

Honda
The sensible crossover-hatchback roofline, the upright driving posture, seating for five adults. It all makes you think: Your Uber is now arriving. Yes, a driver could press the Clarity's Sport mode button and have fun with the on ramps. The steering and especially the brakes feel as natural as any of Honda's excellent OPEC-powered models. But at 4,000-plus pounds and with a zero-to-60 we'd estimate near double digits, you don't get gasoline thrills.

The Clarity comes in one trim option that's loaded with tech like lane-departure warning and automatic braking. Wrapped in suede made from recycled plastic, the digital dash has a ball that shrinks and expands, coaching you toward efficient driving. As long as performance isn't a priority, all that adds up to a hell of a lot of civility for the price, which is a loss-leader low. You can't buy a Clarity—Honda says MSRP would hit near $60,000. You lease it for about $3,000 down and $369 a month. Along with the car, Honda gives you a $15,000 credit card to spend on hydrogen fill-ups. And 21 days of petroleum-car rentals for longer trips. And Californians get a $5,000 rebate. And an HOV sticker. Pick up a few weekend driving shifts and going fuel-cell is cheaper than an iPhone upgrade.—Alexander George

Base price: $369 per month (lease only)

Range: 366 miles

The rear hydrogen tanks are covered in carbon fiber and aluminum to protect against punctures.

TOYOTA MIRAI
gallery-1498485772-toyota1.jpg

Toyota Murai
Driving north out of Los Angeles, I notice the battery gauge tick down a few bars and experience the familiar twinge of range anxiety. Then, the battery display pulls a stunt I've never seen in an electric car, climbing back up to near full. The car charged itself. So cool.

What really happened is that the Mirai's fuel cells sent over some electricity to top off the nickel-metal-hydride battery that powers the 153-hp drive motor. Range concerns alleviated, I gun the little Toyota toward an off ramp, its fuel cells ramping up with a sound that's like someone mowing a lawn two blocks over. Acceleration is reminiscent of a small diesel with excellent torque, good fun once you know how to use it. But the Mirai is a modest setup. Toyota is already demonstrating the high-power possibilities with a heavy-duty truck. The twin fuel cells in that sucker make 670 horsepower and 1,325 lb-ft of torque. Imagine that in a Camry.

gallery-1498485890-toyota-top.jpg

The fuel cell is under the hood, and the 245-volt battery sits beneath the seats, for a low center of gravity.

A few dozen miles later, I look in the rearview mirror to see . . . another Mirai. Is that a glimpse into the future? Fuel cells obviously work. But the question is the same now as it was a decade ago, before the EV takeover—whether something just over the horizon might work even better.—Ezra Dyer

Base price: $57,500

Range: 312 miles





.

Where do you want to get the hydrogen to fuel these cars?

That's always been my question, thank you. You can't just mine or drill for hydrogen. What is the cost in dollars and energy spent to produce hydrogen? What is the cost in infrastructure to distribute the hydrogen once it is produced? Seems even more monumental than the challenges with EV's IMO.

Hydrogen is not a fuel. It is an energy transfer medium. Making hydrogen, storing it, transporting it to fueling station, and the dangers associated with its flammability makes it too expensive to be economically viable.
Yep, way to many hurdles for hydrogen to be the mass energy source.
 

konradv

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If hydrogen cars are the future, the private sector will fund the research.
Fusion power is the future, but don't expect the private sector to be able to fund it. The libertarian mantra doesn't always hold water. ITER - the way to new energy
Fusion is good for cities but how exactly are you going to build a fusion power source for your car? You truly are a broken record dude.
And you have no imagination. Fusion power would be able to generate whatever fuel is most efficient with the most logical being the hydrogen left over after tritium and deuterium are harvested for the fusion reactor.
Yes, and if a frog could fly it would not bump its ass! Pipe dreams.
It's in the future, c. 2050, but no more a pipe dream than atomic power or going to the moon were.
 

miketx

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I never knew Obama killed funding for hydrogen R&D and instead of funded ancient 180 year old electric battery cars..why did he do that? Follow the money I guess another Bell vs telsa game...A/C vs D/C



Meanwhile the Japanese is taking over ..


http://www.popularmechanics.com/car...867/hydrogen-cars-toyota-murai-honda-clarity/



Meet the Next Generation of the Hydrogen Car
Driving Toyota's and Honda's next-gen fuel-cells.



A simple chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car, producing only water, not exhaust fumes." That was George W. Bush in 2003, proposing $1.2 billion to research fuel-cell automobiles. Six years later, President Obama killed that funding





Meanwhile, over in Japan, Toyota and Honda have been at work, spending millions in R&D to make the new hydrogen-powered Mirai and Clarity. It's more reasonable than it sounds. Fuel-cell cars are as appealing now as they were during Bush's first term. It's still the only way to get zero-emissions driving with gasoline convenience—pull up to the pump, wait five minutes, and be on your way. But with less than 40 public hydrogen pumps in the United States, the only Mirai and Clarity customers will be coastal and in big cities. At least for now. We drove the Mirai in Los Angeles and the Clarity in New York, two places promising to build more hydrogen stations in the next two years, to assess both cars' present-day drivability.

HONDA CLARITY
gallery-1498485400-toyota2.jpg

Honda
The sensible crossover-hatchback roofline, the upright driving posture, seating for five adults. It all makes you think: Your Uber is now arriving. Yes, a driver could press the Clarity's Sport mode button and have fun with the on ramps. The steering and especially the brakes feel as natural as any of Honda's excellent OPEC-powered models. But at 4,000-plus pounds and with a zero-to-60 we'd estimate near double digits, you don't get gasoline thrills.

The Clarity comes in one trim option that's loaded with tech like lane-departure warning and automatic braking. Wrapped in suede made from recycled plastic, the digital dash has a ball that shrinks and expands, coaching you toward efficient driving. As long as performance isn't a priority, all that adds up to a hell of a lot of civility for the price, which is a loss-leader low. You can't buy a Clarity—Honda says MSRP would hit near $60,000. You lease it for about $3,000 down and $369 a month. Along with the car, Honda gives you a $15,000 credit card to spend on hydrogen fill-ups. And 21 days of petroleum-car rentals for longer trips. And Californians get a $5,000 rebate. And an HOV sticker. Pick up a few weekend driving shifts and going fuel-cell is cheaper than an iPhone upgrade.—Alexander George

Base price: $369 per month (lease only)

Range: 366 miles

The rear hydrogen tanks are covered in carbon fiber and aluminum to protect against punctures.

TOYOTA MIRAI
gallery-1498485772-toyota1.jpg

Toyota Murai
Driving north out of Los Angeles, I notice the battery gauge tick down a few bars and experience the familiar twinge of range anxiety. Then, the battery display pulls a stunt I've never seen in an electric car, climbing back up to near full. The car charged itself. So cool.

What really happened is that the Mirai's fuel cells sent over some electricity to top off the nickel-metal-hydride battery that powers the 153-hp drive motor. Range concerns alleviated, I gun the little Toyota toward an off ramp, its fuel cells ramping up with a sound that's like someone mowing a lawn two blocks over. Acceleration is reminiscent of a small diesel with excellent torque, good fun once you know how to use it. But the Mirai is a modest setup. Toyota is already demonstrating the high-power possibilities with a heavy-duty truck. The twin fuel cells in that sucker make 670 horsepower and 1,325 lb-ft of torque. Imagine that in a Camry.

gallery-1498485890-toyota-top.jpg

The fuel cell is under the hood, and the 245-volt battery sits beneath the seats, for a low center of gravity.

A few dozen miles later, I look in the rearview mirror to see . . . another Mirai. Is that a glimpse into the future? Fuel cells obviously work. But the question is the same now as it was a decade ago, before the EV takeover—whether something just over the horizon might work even better.—Ezra Dyer

Base price: $57,500

Range: 312 miles





.

Where do you want to get the hydrogen to fuel these cars?
from a stored source like ammonia or water

Ammonia, maybe......how would you get it from water?
Can't.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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If hydrogen cars are the future, the private sector will fund the research.
Fusion power is the future, but don't expect the private sector to be able to fund it. The libertarian mantra doesn't always hold water. ITER - the way to new energy
Fusion is good for cities but how exactly are you going to build a fusion power source for your car? You truly are a broken record dude.
And you have no imagination. Fusion power would be able to generate whatever fuel is most efficient with the most logical being the hydrogen left over after tritium and deuterium are harvested for the fusion reactor.
Yes, and if a frog could fly it would not bump its ass! Pipe dreams.
It's in the future, c. 2050, but no more a pipe dream than atomic power or going to the moon were.

Yeah, how long did it take from Leonardo's drawings to reality?

That figure is no better than if I said it will take to 2075. Pure speculation!
 

jon_berzerk

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indeed one can not rely on speculation

i mean if that was the case

my grandchildren wouldnt know what snow is

they would be dead anyway from drowning

as the east coast was flooded by rising water

--LOL
 

konradv

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Fusion power is the future, but don't expect the private sector to be able to fund it. The libertarian mantra doesn't always hold water. ITER - the way to new energy
Fusion is good for cities but how exactly are you going to build a fusion power source for your car? You truly are a broken record dude.
And you have no imagination. Fusion power would be able to generate whatever fuel is most efficient with the most logical being the hydrogen left over after tritium and deuterium are harvested for the fusion reactor.
Yes, and if a frog could fly it would not bump its ass! Pipe dreams.
It's in the future, c. 2050, but no more a pipe dream than atomic power or going to the moon were.
Yeah, how long did it take from Leonardo's drawings to reality? That figure is no better than if I said it will take to 2075. Pure speculation!
The length of time it takes has no bearing on whether hydrogen could be used as a fuel and 2050 is just around the corner. I perceive a lack of imagination.
 

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