Which Child is 'More' American?

Which Child is 'More' American?


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Mustang

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Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
 

High_Gravity

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According to the laws on the books, its the kid born here, there are illegals sent home everyday who were raised here, as well as immigrants kids from places like Cambodia and Vietnam who get into trouble and because they never got naturalized, they get deported, regardless how long they were here.
 

peach174

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
 

High_Gravity

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
If one of your parents is American, you are also one regardless where you are born. US Service men and women have children born overseas all the time in places like Germany and Japan and those kids are American citizens.
 

flacaltenn

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I'm not even sure if the Texas law you're alluding to includes foreign born children of illegals.

Does it? If it does -- then it's hypocrital for the govt to be sponsoring huge financial incentives for education while they regulate and strong-arm business for hiring illegals.

American born children of illegals ARE citizens (like it or not) and the 2nd/3rd generations will NOT be mowing your lawn, roofing your home or changing your bedpan.. They will be doctors, machinists, commercial pilots and anything they decide to be.. That's a picture of immigration that most Americans are get not getting clearly. They are NOT a permanent underclass to be played by politicians.
 

peach174

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
If one of your parents is American, you are also one regardless where you are born. US Service men and women have children born overseas all the time in places like Germany and Japan and those kids are American citizens.
It is not so simple any more;

Although the "citizenship by birth" rules have been complex, the February 2001 Child Citizenship Act (CCA) simplified the process. Now, a child who is under the age of 18, was born outside the U.S., and has at least one U.S. citizen parent automatically acquires U.S. citizenship upon entry into the country as an immigrant. No further paperwork is necessary. The parent may request a Certificate of Citizenship and U.S. Passport for the child if proof of the baby's American-ness is desired.

But this process only applies to children permanently residing in the U.S. If the child is under 18, was born outside the United States, but lives abroad in the physical and legal custody of a U.S. citizen parent or U.S. citizen grandparent, the parent or grandparent must apply for naturalization of the child. In addition, more criteria must be met.

The U.S. citizen parent or grandparent must have been physically present in the U.S. for five years before the child's birth, at least two of which were after age fourteen. Further, the child must be temporarily present in the U.S. for the naturalization process and to recite the oath of allegiance. Of course, if the child is too young to understand the oath, this requirement may be waived.

At this naturalization ceremony, the foreign-born, foreign-resident babies gain not only a certificate of citizenship but also membership into an exclusive club. The Constitution rules that only "natural born" citizens can hold our highest office, so it seems these new Americans won't grow up to be President either. The regulations suggest parents who contemplate baby's future run for the White House may want to consider permanent residence in the United States after the birth of little George or Hilary.

As with other areas of immigration and naturalization in this post-9/11 world, the guidelines change often. As such, these rules only apply to those children born on or after the effective date of the CCA. The law in place at the time of the child's birth governs immigration, so research carefully.

If you are expecting a child abroad and want to be sure of your baby's citizenship, check with your local embassy for the latest laws. In any case, you should register your child's birth with the embassy as soon as possible as the first step in establishing your child's claim to U.S. citizenship at birth.
 

Soggy in NOLA

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Can the OP please add a button entitled "What a stupid question".
 

High_Gravity

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
If one of your parents is American, you are also one regardless where you are born. US Service men and women have children born overseas all the time in places like Germany and Japan and those kids are American citizens.
It is not so simple any more;

Although the "citizenship by birth" rules have been complex, the February 2001 Child Citizenship Act (CCA) simplified the process. Now, a child who is under the age of 18, was born outside the U.S., and has at least one U.S. citizen parent automatically acquires U.S. citizenship upon entry into the country as an immigrant. No further paperwork is necessary. The parent may request a Certificate of Citizenship and U.S. Passport for the child if proof of the baby's American-ness is desired.

But this process only applies to children permanently residing in the U.S. If the child is under 18, was born outside the United States, but lives abroad in the physical and legal custody of a U.S. citizen parent or U.S. citizen grandparent, the parent or grandparent must apply for naturalization of the child. In addition, more criteria must be met.

The U.S. citizen parent or grandparent must have been physically present in the U.S. for five years before the child's birth, at least two of which were after age fourteen. Further, the child must be temporarily present in the U.S. for the naturalization process and to recite the oath of allegiance. Of course, if the child is too young to understand the oath, this requirement may be waived.

At this naturalization ceremony, the foreign-born, foreign-resident babies gain not only a certificate of citizenship but also membership into an exclusive club. The Constitution rules that only "natural born" citizens can hold our highest office, so it seems these new Americans won't grow up to be President either. The regulations suggest parents who contemplate baby's future run for the White House may want to consider permanent residence in the United States after the birth of little George or Hilary.

As with other areas of immigration and naturalization in this post-9/11 world, the guidelines change often. As such, these rules only apply to those children born on or after the effective date of the CCA. The law in place at the time of the child's birth governs immigration, so research carefully.

If you are expecting a child abroad and want to be sure of your baby's citizenship, check with your local embassy for the latest laws. In any case, you should register your child's birth with the embassy as soon as possible as the first step in establishing your child's claim to U.S. citizenship at birth.
Thats exactly what you do, American children are born abroad all the time and its not a problem as long as you register with the embassy, you have to think we have alot of American expats working abroad in Europe, China and the Middle East, not every American is born in the US. John McCain was born in Panama I believe.
 

peach174

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
If one of your parents is American, you are also one regardless where you are born. US Service men and women have children born overseas all the time in places like Germany and Japan and those kids are American citizens.
The Laws on U.S. Foreign Bases
U.S. installations in foreign countries are not considered part of the United States. So, delivering a baby at a U.S. naval base or embassy in a foreign country does not entitle the baby to U.S. citizenship.
You still have to register them, it is not automatic.
 

bripat9643

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The child with an American BC is a legal American. As such, he will always be more American than an illegal alien.

However, the bottom line is that your question is just a scam to justify amnesty for illegal aliens.

Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
 

JamesInFlorida

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
You can be a legal immigrant and never become naturalized...
 

WillowTree

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Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
The one with the valid American Birth Certificate. How stupid do you have to be not to know that..
 

Soggy in NOLA

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Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
The one with the valid American Birth Certificate. How stupid do you have to be not to know that..
Exactly. One's an American, one is not.

But, in the minds of the whackaloon left, if you sneak over here illegally you have every right to have your eight children taught in Spanish and all the free health care you can ever use.
 

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The Law is the law of the land.
If you were born in any county beside the USA you are not a citizen till you make it legal.
If you don't become naturalized you are a law breaker, you get deported.
If one of your parents is American, you are also one regardless where you are born. US Service men and women have children born overseas all the time in places like Germany and Japan and those kids are American citizens.
Then why was there such a stink from some on the left about McCain being born (to American citizen parents) in the Panama Canal Zone? So much so that Congress eventually stepped in and 'declared' him a natural born citizen.
 

Conservative

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Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
Which Child is 'More' American?

Legally? Spiritually? Morally? Ethically? Patriotically?

The question is vague.
 

Soggy in NOLA

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Here's the scenario.

On a particular day, two children are born at the exact same time. One is born Loredo, TX and has an American birth certificate.

The other child is born in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico, and has a Mexican birth certificate (translation: the child does NOT have an American BC).

The child born in America moves overseas to another country with his parents who may, or many not, be American. The other country is irrelevant to the story. The child never travels back to America prior to turning 18, although he's legally entitled to do so.

The Mexican-born child crosses the American border with his parents the next day and is raised in America AS an American without any knowledge that he was born in Mexico.

So, the question is WHICH young person at the age of 18 is really more American? Is it the one with the American BC who was raised in a foreign country. Or is it the foreign born child who was raised as American in America?
Which Child is 'More' American?

Legally? Spiritually? Morally? Ethically? Patriotically?

The question is vague.
It's Mustang...
 
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Mustang

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If you're not a citizen, by definition you are not an American.. and you can't be less of an American than not being one
This thread is hopefully going to get some people to think about what actually constitutes 'being American' as opposed to simply 'being a citizen.'

A person can be made a citizen with either a birth inside our borders or the stroke of a pen. But are those people more fundamentally 'American' (whatever that means) than someone who is actually raised here from infancy even if they don't have the documentation of a BC to make it official.
 

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