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We are selling stuff to China that may have military uses

task0778

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The U.S. has identified intensifying technological competition with China as a top national-security threat. But a Commerce Department-led process that reviews U.S. tech exports to the country approves almost all requests and has overseen an increase in sales of some particularly important technologies, according to an analysis of trade data. Of the U.S.’s total $125 billion in exports to China in 2020, officials required a license for less than half a percent, Commerce Department data shows. Of that fraction, the agency approved 94%, or 2,652, applications for technology exports to China. The figures omit applications “returned without action,” meaning their outcomes were uncertain.

The result: The U.S. continues to send to China an array of semiconductors, aerospace components, artificial-intelligence technology and other items that could be used to advance Beijing’s military interests.

Critics say Commerce officials are improperly giving priority to U.S. commercial interests over national security and that an urgent regulatory revamp is necessary to respond to the threat from Beijing. For Steve Coonen, the Pentagon’s former top China export-controls analyst, the high rate of approvals for licenses to sell tech with potential military use is evidence of significant policy failure.

“I have no problem trading with or feeding China,” Mr. Coonen told colleagues in a September 2021 email after resigning over frustrations with the policy. “I have a huge problem with arming China.” A Pentagon spokeswoman declined to comment on Mr. Coonen’s resignation.

Some warn tighter restrictions on U.S. tech sales to China will backfire because allies such as Germany, Japan and South Korea will step in to fill the void. For export restrictions to be effective, “we need our allies to have the same controls,” said Kevin Wolf, a senior Commerce official during the Obama administration, while testifying on Capitol Hill last year. “It is that simple and logical.” Such coordination, however, could take years, and others argue that China’s official military-civil fusion policy—which seeks to erase the distinctions between the military and the private sector—requires an immediate response, because it has made it impossible for the U.S. to guarantee tech transferred to China won’t end up in military hands.



So, if a war ever happens between the US and China, at least some American service members could be killed or captured because of technology we sold to the Chinese. We are making it easier and cheaper for them to build their military and thus increase their ability to attack Taiwan and other interests in the region, such as South Korea.
 

Meister

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Does that surprise anyone? I'm mean it's the Brandon administration....."come on, Man!"
 

Mr Clean

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We can’t get a little thing like national security get in the way of potential profits.
 

KissMy

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Trump told China classified nuclear secrets. “I have built a nuclear — a weapons system that nobody’s ever had in this country before. We have stuff that you haven’t even seen or heard about. We have stuff that Putin and Xi have never heard about before. There’s nobody — what we have is incredible,” Trump said.

 

Indeependent

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The U.S. has identified intensifying technological competition with China as a top national-security threat. But a Commerce Department-led process that reviews U.S. tech exports to the country approves almost all requests and has overseen an increase in sales of some particularly important technologies, according to an analysis of trade data. Of the U.S.’s total $125 billion in exports to China in 2020, officials required a license for less than half a percent, Commerce Department data shows. Of that fraction, the agency approved 94%, or 2,652, applications for technology exports to China. The figures omit applications “returned without action,” meaning their outcomes were uncertain.

The result: The U.S. continues to send to China an array of semiconductors, aerospace components, artificial-intelligence technology and other items that could be used to advance Beijing’s military interests.

Critics say Commerce officials are improperly giving priority to U.S. commercial interests over national security and that an urgent regulatory revamp is necessary to respond to the threat from Beijing. For Steve Coonen, the Pentagon’s former top China export-controls analyst, the high rate of approvals for licenses to sell tech with potential military use is evidence of significant policy failure.

“I have no problem trading with or feeding China,” Mr. Coonen told colleagues in a September 2021 email after resigning over frustrations with the policy. “I have a huge problem with arming China.” A Pentagon spokeswoman declined to comment on Mr. Coonen’s resignation.

Some warn tighter restrictions on U.S. tech sales to China will backfire because allies such as Germany, Japan and South Korea will step in to fill the void. For export restrictions to be effective, “we need our allies to have the same controls,” said Kevin Wolf, a senior Commerce official during the Obama administration, while testifying on Capitol Hill last year. “It is that simple and logical.” Such coordination, however, could take years, and others argue that China’s official military-civil fusion policy—which seeks to erase the distinctions between the military and the private sector—requires an immediate response, because it has made it impossible for the U.S. to guarantee tech transferred to China won’t end up in military hands.



So, if a war ever happens between the US and China, at least some American service members could be killed or captured because of technology we sold to the Chinese. We are making it easier and cheaper for them to build their military and thus increase their ability to attack Taiwan and other interests in the region, such as South Korea.
I hate to say it but GW had our military's jet engines manufactured in China which is why we need an outsider like Trump in the Oval Office.
 
OP
task0778

task0778

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Does that surprise anyone? I'm mean it's the Brandon administration....."come on, Man!"

From the OP link:

Rep. Michael McCaul (R., Texas), the ranking Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, who has been pushing for tighter controls, said the Commerce Department from Nov. 9, 2020, through April 20, 2021, issued more than $100 billion worth of export licenses to suppliers of blacklisted Chinese firms Huawei Technologies Co. and Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. The Commerce Department had added SMIC to the list after defense contractor James Mulvenon documented the chip maker’s military customers.

SMIC recently gained the capability to make 7-nanometer chips, its most advanced yet, according to researchers at Canadian firm TechInsights Inc. “This is a groundbreaking discovery because the U.S. Department of Commerce was supposed to be restricting export licenses,” wrote semiconductor analyst Dylan Patel.


How long have we been doing this? It looks like it's been going on for awhile now, before Biden came into office.
 

marvin martian

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The U.S. has identified intensifying technological competition with China as a top national-security threat. But a Commerce Department-led process that reviews U.S. tech exports to the country approves almost all requests and has overseen an increase in sales of some particularly important technologies, according to an analysis of trade data. Of the U.S.’s total $125 billion in exports to China in 2020, officials required a license for less than half a percent, Commerce Department data shows. Of that fraction, the agency approved 94%, or 2,652, applications for technology exports to China. The figures omit applications “returned without action,” meaning their outcomes were uncertain.

The result: The U.S. continues to send to China an array of semiconductors, aerospace components, artificial-intelligence technology and other items that could be used to advance Beijing’s military interests.

Critics say Commerce officials are improperly giving priority to U.S. commercial interests over national security and that an urgent regulatory revamp is necessary to respond to the threat from Beijing. For Steve Coonen, the Pentagon’s former top China export-controls analyst, the high rate of approvals for licenses to sell tech with potential military use is evidence of significant policy failure.

“I have no problem trading with or feeding China,” Mr. Coonen told colleagues in a September 2021 email after resigning over frustrations with the policy. “I have a huge problem with arming China.” A Pentagon spokeswoman declined to comment on Mr. Coonen’s resignation.

Some warn tighter restrictions on U.S. tech sales to China will backfire because allies such as Germany, Japan and South Korea will step in to fill the void. For export restrictions to be effective, “we need our allies to have the same controls,” said Kevin Wolf, a senior Commerce official during the Obama administration, while testifying on Capitol Hill last year. “It is that simple and logical.” Such coordination, however, could take years, and others argue that China’s official military-civil fusion policy—which seeks to erase the distinctions between the military and the private sector—requires an immediate response, because it has made it impossible for the U.S. to guarantee tech transferred to China won’t end up in military hands.



So, if a war ever happens between the US and China, at least some American service members could be killed or captured because of technology we sold to the Chinese. We are making it easier and cheaper for them to build their military and thus increase their ability to attack Taiwan and other interests in the region, such as South Korea.

This is how the Clintons got rich.
 
OP
task0778

task0778

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I hate to say it but GW had our military's jet engines manufactured in China which is why we need an outsider like Trump in the Oval Office.

Didn't know that. They probably built those engines with parts and materials that we sold to them, and they probably built their own military jet engines with our technologies. I'm not too sure it makes much difference who the president is or which party controls Congress anymore, at least as regards this particular issue. Money talks and everybody listens.
 

Donald H

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American capitalism has its own priorities that are far more important than any security considerations. America's enemies can depend on that.

This leaves capitalists whose ideals are solely based on personal greed, compromised by fascist ideals of racism attempting to forbid trade with China.

But then, the capitalist's hands are tied on account of him not being able to profit by adhering to 'made in America', by white Americans.
 

Indeependent

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American capitalism has its own priorities that are far more important than any security considerations. America's enemies can depend on that.

This leaves capitalists whose ideals are solely based on personal greed, compromised by fascist ideals of racism attempting to forbid trade with China.

But then, the capitalist's hands are tied on account of him not being able to profit by adhering to 'made in America', by white Americans.
WTF are you talking about?
Capitalists love China.
 

shockedcanadian

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Trump told China classified nuclear secrets. “I have built a nuclear — a weapons system that nobody’s ever had in this country before. We have stuff that you haven’t even seen or heard about. We have stuff that Putin and Xi have never heard about before. There’s nobody — what we have is incredible,” Trump said.



Just as Russia pretended they determined the election of 2016 OF COURSE they are going to rattle the cage of any media in the U.S about what they know.

"Oh, we already saw the secret documents, haha" Let's make it look official with a "news report".
Does anybody truly believe that the Russians would publicly tell the world what they know? That they would risk their source and/or methods?

They know the U.S market well, first, that people like the above would tweet and repeat their lie, second, to create suspicion and division, especially among partisans. It's about embarrassing America and taunting their intelligence agencies, always. If they can rile up suspicions, even better.

U.S and Russia have 12k combined nukes. I doubt either of them believes they could survive the full launch of all of them and that's before the newest technology is rolled out.
 
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Donald H

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WTF are you talking about?
Capitalists love China.
Yes they do in effect love China. You've failed to understand because you don't understand capitalism's priorities.

And then the fact that free trade with Chinese flies directly in the face of fascism's racist priorities.

Your fellow extreme rightists plainly state their hating sentiments several times each day on this board. Fascism doesn't come free for capitalists.
 

Indeependent

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Yes they do in effect love China. You've failed to understand because you don't understand capitalism's priorities.

And then the fact that free trade with Chinese flies directly in the face of fascism's racist priorities.

Your fellow extreme rightists plainly state their hating sentiments several times each day on this board. Fascism doesn't come free for capitalists.
WTF are you talking about?
The top less than 1% are vying for bragging rights to everything in life and want the cheapest labor possible.
 
OP
task0778

task0778

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Yes they do in effect love China. You've failed to understand because you don't understand capitalism's priorities.

And then the fact that free trade with Chinese flies directly in the face of fascism's racist priorities.

Your fellow extreme rightists plainly state their hating sentiments several times each day on this board. Fascism doesn't come free for capitalists.

What you apparently do not understand is that fascism and capitalism are opposites and not compatible at all. Fascism is all about total gov't control of everything, that's why it is a far Left institution similar to socialism and communism. the only real difference is a little extra nationalism and racism thrown in. Fascism is all about governance, not economics.

Capitalism on the other hand, is all about as little gov't control as possible so the capitalists can make as much money as possible. But where fascism is all about government control, capitalism is all about economics and profits but it does require sufficient gov't oversight to ensure fair and equitable treatment for everybody. Which obviously in a free enterprise system in a democratic republic is a very hard thing to do. To date, there is no better system of government than the one we've got, although with some tweaks and minor changes it could be better than it is now.
 

Donald H

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What you apparently do not understand is that fascism and capitalism are opposites and not compatible at all.
Not exactly opposite but not compatible and that's the exact point i'm making.
Fascism is all about total gov't control of everything,
No not government but quasi-government that mascerades as an elected government. Communism on the other end of the spectrum makes no such claim. Fascism eliminates elected government and replaces civil servants with people who are completely biased to the demands of the dictator. We should be able to agree on that at least.
Capitalism on the other hand, is all about as little gov't control as possible so the capitalists can make as much money as possible.
You're on the right track with the ideals of capitalism, except that smaller government isn't an ideal. Socialism is a necessary component of capitalism and is the missing component in America's greedy brand of capitalism. The democracies of the world differ on their capitalism, as most Americans acknowledge.

The fascist ideology maintains that 'more' money can be made when government is completely eliminated and biased leaders are installed at all levels of government. (see fascist Germany of the 30's and 40's.)
But where fascism is all about government control, capitalism is all about economics and profits but it does require sufficient gov't oversight to ensure fair and equitable treatment for everybody.
Not 'all about' but sufficiently true enough. The oversight is dictated by the priorities of the fascist dictator.
Which obviously in a free enterprise system in a democratic republic is a very hard thing to do. To date, there is no better system of government than the one we've got, although with some tweaks and minor changes it could be better than it is now.
No better system?


A young democracy that comes dangerously close to a successful coup to overthrow a democratic election?

And then the coup attempt having failed, a consistent maintaining of the premise that the election was stolen and democracy was overruled?

Did communism steal your election? Was your election stolen and then thusly prove that your system failed and couldn't endure the challenge?
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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I hate to say it but GW had our military's jet engines manufactured in China which is why we need an outsider like Trump in the Oval Office.

Why do you lie constantly? That is simply not true.

Provide a link if you think you can!

You will probably tuck tail and run like the coward you appear to be!
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Didn't know that. They probably built those engines with parts and materials that we sold to them, and they probably built their own military jet engines with our technologies. I'm not too sure it makes much difference who the president is or which party controls Congress anymore, at least as regards this particular issue. Money talks and everybody listens.
He's lying, as per usual.
 

Indeependent

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Why do you lie constantly? That is simply not true.

Provide a link if you think you can!

You will probably tuck tail and run like the coward you appear to be!
I guess FoxNews was lying back then.
 

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