Vaccine To Prevent Breast Cancer?

PixieStix

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A first-of-its-kind vaccine to prevent breast cancer has shown overwhelmingly favorable results in animal models, according to a study by researchers at Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute.
The researchers found that a single vaccination with the antigen α-lactalbumin prevents breast cancer tumors from forming in mice, while also inhibiting the growth of already existing tumors. Human trials could begin within the next year. If successful, it would be the first vaccine to prevent breast cancer.


Cleveland Clinic Researchers Develop Prototype Vaccine To Prevent Breast Cancer

We will see how this pans out. Hope it is works without life threatening side effects
 

jessica

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It is Breast Cancer. Not Women't Cancer. Unfortunately, Men can also get Breast Cancer. There can be an even worse prognosis when Men develop Breast Cancer.


Prevent Breast Cancer

Way to go Cleveland!
 
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waltky

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Inna summer, when it's hot an' sultry, womens come `round to Uncle Ferd's cabana umbrella fer free breast exams...

Researcher: Breast Cancer Deaths Decline in Many Countries
December 09, 2016 | WASHINGTON — A new study says the rates of breast cancer mortality are dropping across much of the world, but not everywhere.
Using data from the World Health Organization, researchers at the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France, calculated mortality rates in 47 countries between 1987 and 2013. They found a drop in mortality rates in 39 countries. Declines in breast cancer deaths were most prominent in developed countries, with England and Wales experiencing the biggest drops.

Some rates are up

Results from South America were mixed. Breast cancer death rates increased for women of all ages in Brazil and Colombia, while rates declined for all women in Argentina and Chile. South Korea had the largest increase in mortality among women, with an 83 percent increase overall and a higher mortality in every age group. Cecile Pizot, an epidemiologist and the study’s lead author, said changes in South Korean society, which is quickly evolving from an agricultural society to a highly industrialized one, “might explain the considerable shift in cancer mortality.”


A woman walks under a canopy of umbrellas erected outside the Ministry of Public Health, part of a campaign aiming at raising awareness of breast cancer prevention, in Beirut, Lebanon​

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer for women globally: 1 in 4 cancers diagnosed in women is breast cancer, the International Business Times reported. “Comparing mortality trends between countries helps identify which health care systems have been most efficient at reducing breast cancer mortality,” Pizot said.

Age plays a role

Other findings in the study: In the United States, breast cancer death rates decreased 36.36 percent, from 22 deaths per 100,000 women in the years 1987-1989, to 14 deaths per 100,000 women in the years 2011-2013. Globally, Pizot said mortality rates went down more for women younger than 50 than for women older than 50. She thinks it’s because younger women receive more aggressive treatment. Pizot said it’s not clear what role mammography plays in helping to identify early breast cancers, the period when the disease is most treatable.

She said some countries in similar geographic locations and with similar socio-economic status had similar trends in mortality, even though some health care systems in those regions started using breast X-rays earlier than others. Pizot said future research should focus on risk factors, access to health care and the use of multidisciplinary treatment teams. Pizot presented the findings at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting held this week in San Antonio, Texas. The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, which began in 1977, has grown to a five-day conference that draws researchers and physicians from more than 90 countries.

Researcher: Breast Cancer Deaths Decline in Many Countries
 

waltky

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New Tool to Detect Breast Cancer...

Radiologists Have a New Tool to Detect Breast Cancer
December 29, 2017 | WASHINGTON — Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and early detection saves lives.
Scientists are working on finding new ways to detect breast cancer while at the same time they are studying existing screening methods to find out what is best. Take, for example, mammograms. During a mammogram, a technician takes an X-ray of a woman’s breast as it’s compressed between two glass plates. A radiologist then examines the image for tumors. They are the best screening tools available: The number of deaths from breast cancer has fallen by 30 percent in the U.S. since mammography was introduced in the 1970s. That’s because when cancer is found early, the chances of beating it are greater. But mammograms aren’t 100 percent accurate. A mammogram can look normal even when cancer is present, and it can look abnormal even though there’s no cancer in the breast at all.

3-D mammography

Standard mammograms are two dimensional, but for the 40 to 50 percent of women with dense breasts, both tumors and breast tissue can show up as white masses on 2-D images. Three-dimensional mammograms show a more detailed view of the breast, so women with fibrous or dense breasts may benefit from a 3-D screening, said Dr. Otis Brawley at the American Cancer Society. “It might find disease that we need to find that two-dimensional does not,” he said. “There are potential cons in that it has a higher cost, higher amount of radiation, given every dose, every time a person has a test, as well as it may find a higher number of false positives.” Cost aside, one study involving 13 U.S. hospitals showed that three-dimensional mammograms picked up an additional 40 percent of invasive cancers.

Ultrasound

For an even better picture, a woman could have an automated whole-breast ultrasound. During this procedure, a woman lies on her back as the ultrasound device moves in parallel rows so no areas of the breast are missed. The exam captures between 3,000 to 5,000 images that are then interpreted by a radiologist. Dr. Megha Garg is the director of the breast-imaging program at the University of Missouri cancer center. “This is a new screening technique,” she said. “It helps detect additional breast cancers in females who have dense breasts.”

The whole-breast ultrasound doesn’t use radiation, so it poses less of a risk than a mammogram does, but Garg says it’s not time to ditch the standard mammogram. “This tool does not replace the traditional mammogram. Mammograms are the gold standard for finding breast cancer,” she said. “This helps the mammogram in those females who have dense breasts. Studies are underway to find out which techniques are the most effective. While North America, Western Europe and Australia have the highest rates of breast cancer, the World Health Organization reports that almost 50 percent of the cases and nearly 60 percent of the deaths occur in less-developed countries. If detection and treatment could be improves, at least 400,000 women’s lives could be saved every year.

Radiologist Have a New Tool to Detect Breast Cancer
 

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