U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions

Mustang

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Remember the days when we were told that Iraqi reconstruction would only cost the American taxpayers about a billion dollars and that Iraqi oil revenue would pay for the rest? Why didn't the contracts specify that Iraq would have to at least partially reimburse the US for construction costs if we turned the bases and equipment over to them.

We had two CEOs as president and VP? What a joke!

Those bases didn't come cheap. Construction costs exceeded $2.4 billion, according to an analysis of Pentagon annual reports by the Congressional Research Service. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers alone was responsible for $1.9 billion in base construction contracts between 2004 and 2010, a spokesman told HuffPost.

It wasn't until late in Bush's second term that "cooler heads prevailed," Hurlburt said, and it became apparent that there was no political will in either country for the U.S. to keep permanent bases in Iraq, and therefore no need to spend so much to build them.

But by then, the plans had already been set in motion. As Stars and Stripes reported last year, major construction continued even after November 2008, when then-President George W. Bush and Iraqi officials signed a security agreement calling for all U.S. troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

Most of the $2.4 billion was spent building about a dozen huge outposts that, in addition to containing air strips and massive fortifications also have all the comforts of home. The Al-Asad Airfield in Anbar province, for example, covers 25 square miles -- about the size of Boulder, Colo. -- and is known as "Camp Cupcake" due to its amenities.

The 15-square-mile Joint Base Balad, as Whitney Terrell wrote earlier this year for Slate, is "home to three football-field-sized chow halls, a 25-meter swimming pool, a high dive, a football field, a softball field, two full-service gyms, a squash court, a movie theater, and the U.S. military's largest airfield in Iraq."

U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions
 
R

rdean

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Remember the days when we were told that Iraqi reconstruction would only cost the American taxpayers about a billion dollars and that Iraqi oil revenue would pay for the rest? Why didn't the contracts specify that Iraq would have to at least partially reimburse the US for construction costs if we turned the bases and equipment over to them.

We had two CEOs as president and VP? What a joke!

Those bases didn't come cheap. Construction costs exceeded $2.4 billion, according to an analysis of Pentagon annual reports by the Congressional Research Service. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers alone was responsible for $1.9 billion in base construction contracts between 2004 and 2010, a spokesman told HuffPost.

It wasn't until late in Bush's second term that "cooler heads prevailed," Hurlburt said, and it became apparent that there was no political will in either country for the U.S. to keep permanent bases in Iraq, and therefore no need to spend so much to build them.

But by then, the plans had already been set in motion. As Stars and Stripes reported last year, major construction continued even after November 2008, when then-President George W. Bush and Iraqi officials signed a security agreement calling for all U.S. troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

Most of the $2.4 billion was spent building about a dozen huge outposts that, in addition to containing air strips and massive fortifications also have all the comforts of home. The Al-Asad Airfield in Anbar province, for example, covers 25 square miles -- about the size of Boulder, Colo. -- and is known as "Camp Cupcake" due to its amenities.

The 15-square-mile Joint Base Balad, as Whitney Terrell wrote earlier this year for Slate, is "home to three football-field-sized chow halls, a 25-meter swimming pool, a high dive, a football field, a softball field, two full-service gyms, a squash court, a movie theater, and the U.S. military's largest airfield in Iraq."

U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions
Republicans will blame this on Obama. In their unethical little world, a new president can just come in and undo everything the last president did. Wipe it away as if it didn't exist. But in this world, current presidents are bound by what previous presidents did. Whether it's ruining the economy or committing America's wealth to another country.

Look at the right zingers on this board. How many insist we "won" in Iraq? Ask them what we "won" and you are a lying fuckwit liberal. Why? Because you asked a question they can't answer. Well, they can answer it, but they are too ashamed.

Just like the economy, Afghanistan, the deficit, our failing infrastructure, jobs moved to China and all they other Republican mess and disasters, they will blame this too, on Obama.
 

High_Gravity

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Those bases will turn into shit holes once the Iraqis get their hands on them.
 

High_Gravity

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Those bases will turn into shit holes once the Iraqis get their hands on them.
You took the words right out of my mouth.
Those bases in Iraq are hard billeting, they have rooms with hot showers, recreation areas, good dining halls, basketball courts, swimming pools, etc all that will be turned to shit, wouldn't be surprised if the swimming pool becomes a make shift toilet.
 

Mr Clean

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Those bases will turn into shit holes once the Iraqis get their hands on them.
You took the words right out of my mouth.
Those bases in Iraq are hard billeting, they have rooms with hot showers, recreation areas, good dining halls, basketball courts, swimming pools, etc all that will be turned to shit, wouldn't be surprised if the swimming pool becomes a make shift toilet.
Emptied, those swimming pools can be used as convenient places to stone their women and then wash the blood and gore down afterwards.
 

Avatar4321

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Actually, I dont remember that. I remember specifically being told that it would take a while and cost alot. Silly me.
 

High_Gravity

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You took the words right out of my mouth.
Those bases in Iraq are hard billeting, they have rooms with hot showers, recreation areas, good dining halls, basketball courts, swimming pools, etc all that will be turned to shit, wouldn't be surprised if the swimming pool becomes a make shift toilet.
Emptied, those swimming pools can be used as convenient places to stone their women and then wash the blood and gore down afterwards.
Or to torture people, those huge swimming pools will make very tempting rest rooms for the Iraqis trust me, maybe a place for them to wash their feet, gear and shower. Don't ask me thats just how they do.
 

Mr Clean

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Those bases in Iraq are hard billeting, they have rooms with hot showers, recreation areas, good dining halls, basketball courts, swimming pools, etc all that will be turned to shit, wouldn't be surprised if the swimming pool becomes a make shift toilet.
Emptied, those swimming pools can be used as convenient places to stone their women and then wash the blood and gore down afterwards.
Or to torture people, those huge swimming pools will make very tempting rest rooms for the Iraqis trust me, maybe a place for them to wash their feet, gear and shower. Don't ask me thats just how they do.
They have a completely different set of values than we do. Many years ago I worked with a guy from Egypt, an engineer. One day we got to talking and I asked hime why he left to come here. He said" In my country, if you have the opportunity to take advantage of someone and you don't, then you're considered a fool and not worthy of respect."

Nice
 

High_Gravity

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Emptied, those swimming pools can be used as convenient places to stone their women and then wash the blood and gore down afterwards.
Or to torture people, those huge swimming pools will make very tempting rest rooms for the Iraqis trust me, maybe a place for them to wash their feet, gear and shower. Don't ask me thats just how they do.
They have a completely different set of values than we do. Many years ago I worked with a guy from Egypt, an engineer. One day we got to talking and I asked hime why he left to come here. He said" In my country, if you have the opportunity to take advantage of someone and you don't, then you're considered a fool and not worthy of respect."

Nice
Its just a different culture man, I really can't explain it. Their hygiene is very poor also, when I was in Kuwait I would see Kuwaitis take off their shoes and use water from drinking fountains to wash their dirty feet, from fucking drinking fountains, and Kuwait is a oil rich country and every house has running water and showers, no need for this kind of crude behavior but there it is. I should add of course not every Iraqi or Kuwaiti is this way but a good number are.
 

VaYank5150

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Remember the days when we were told that Iraqi reconstruction would only cost the American taxpayers about a billion dollars and that Iraqi oil revenue would pay for the rest? Why didn't the contracts specify that Iraq would have to at least partially reimburse the US for construction costs if we turned the bases and equipment over to them.

We had two CEOs as president and VP? What a joke!

Those bases didn't come cheap. Construction costs exceeded $2.4 billion, according to an analysis of Pentagon annual reports by the Congressional Research Service. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers alone was responsible for $1.9 billion in base construction contracts between 2004 and 2010, a spokesman told HuffPost.

It wasn't until late in Bush's second term that "cooler heads prevailed," Hurlburt said, and it became apparent that there was no political will in either country for the U.S. to keep permanent bases in Iraq, and therefore no need to spend so much to build them.

But by then, the plans had already been set in motion. As Stars and Stripes reported last year, major construction continued even after November 2008, when then-President George W. Bush and Iraqi officials signed a security agreement calling for all U.S. troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

Most of the $2.4 billion was spent building about a dozen huge outposts that, in addition to containing air strips and massive fortifications also have all the comforts of home. The Al-Asad Airfield in Anbar province, for example, covers 25 square miles -- about the size of Boulder, Colo. -- and is known as "Camp Cupcake" due to its amenities.

The 15-square-mile Joint Base Balad, as Whitney Terrell wrote earlier this year for Slate, is "home to three football-field-sized chow halls, a 25-meter swimming pool, a high dive, a football field, a softball field, two full-service gyms, a squash court, a movie theater, and the U.S. military's largest airfield in Iraq."

U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions
This is what "conservatives" call necessary spending per the Constitution. It falls under the "protection" clause, apparently.
 

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Fighting the war on terror compromises the economy now and threatens it in the future.

By Linda J. Bilmes and Joseph E. Stiglitz
September 18, 2011


Ten years into the war on terror, the U.S. has largely succeeded in its attempts to destabilize Al Qaeda and eliminate its leaders. But the cost has been enormous, and our decisions about how to finance it have profoundly damaged the U.S. economy.

Many of these costs were unnecessary. We chose to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan with a small, all-volunteer force, and we supplemented the military presence with a heavy reliance on civilian contractors. These decisions not only placed enormous strain on the troops but dramatically pushed up costs. Recent congressional investigations have shown that roughly 1 of every 4 dollars spent on wartime contracting was wasted or misspent.

To date, the United States has spent more than $2.5 trillion on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon spending spree that accompanied it and a battery of new homeland security measures instituted after Sept. 11.

How have we paid for this? Entirely through borrowing. Spending on the wars and on added security at home has accounted for more than one-quarter of the total increase in U.S. government debt since 2001. And not only did we fail to pay as we went for the wars, the George W. Bush administration also successfully pushed to cut taxes in 2001 and again in 2003, which added further to the debt. This toxic combination of lower revenues and higher spending has brought the country to its current political stalemate.

War Costs
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe--bilmes-war-cost-20110918,0,999206.story?track=rss
 
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Quantum Windbag

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Remember the days when we were told that Iraqi reconstruction would only cost the American taxpayers about a billion dollars and that Iraqi oil revenue would pay for the rest? Why didn't the contracts specify that Iraq would have to at least partially reimburse the US for construction costs if we turned the bases and equipment over to them.

We had two CEOs as president and VP? What a joke!

Those bases didn't come cheap. Construction costs exceeded $2.4 billion, according to an analysis of Pentagon annual reports by the Congressional Research Service. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers alone was responsible for $1.9 billion in base construction contracts between 2004 and 2010, a spokesman told HuffPost.

It wasn't until late in Bush's second term that "cooler heads prevailed," Hurlburt said, and it became apparent that there was no political will in either country for the U.S. to keep permanent bases in Iraq, and therefore no need to spend so much to build them.

But by then, the plans had already been set in motion. As Stars and Stripes reported last year, major construction continued even after November 2008, when then-President George W. Bush and Iraqi officials signed a security agreement calling for all U.S. troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

Most of the $2.4 billion was spent building about a dozen huge outposts that, in addition to containing air strips and massive fortifications also have all the comforts of home. The Al-Asad Airfield in Anbar province, for example, covers 25 square miles -- about the size of Boulder, Colo. -- and is known as "Camp Cupcake" due to its amenities.

The 15-square-mile Joint Base Balad, as Whitney Terrell wrote earlier this year for Slate, is "home to three football-field-sized chow halls, a 25-meter swimming pool, a high dive, a football field, a softball field, two full-service gyms, a squash court, a movie theater, and the U.S. military's largest airfield in Iraq."

U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions
Republicans will blame this on Obama. In their unethical little world, a new president can just come in and undo everything the last president did. Wipe it away as if it didn't exist. But in this world, current presidents are bound by what previous presidents did. Whether it's ruining the economy or committing America's wealth to another country.

Look at the right zingers on this board. How many insist we "won" in Iraq? Ask them what we "won" and you are a lying fuckwit liberal. Why? Because you asked a question they can't answer. Well, they can answer it, but they are too ashamed.

Just like the economy, Afghanistan, the deficit, our failing infrastructure, jobs moved to China and all they other Republican mess and disasters, they will blame this too, on Obama.
I blame Obama for transferring the vehicles and movable supplies without getting paid. Can you explain how that is Bush's fault? Can you point ot anything anywhere where we said we would leave everything behind when we left?
 

Londoner

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Bush financed his war through borrowing.

Then he tried to hide it off budget through emergency spending measures.

In exchange for congressional support, he agreed not to veto one bridge to nowhere. He handed out houses to the middle class so that they would go along; he fed the wealthy tax cuts so that they would go along, and he passed more pork than any president in history so that he could get the votes.

Bush learned his from his fellow Texan, Lyndon B Johnson.

(File this under "Guns and Butter")



But, but, but . . . (wait for it) . . . we're not allowed to blame him for anything.

Meanwhile, he refused to burst the largest bubble in US History . . . which lead to the death of the global economy.

(But he must never be blamed for a thing)

(Brilliant)
 
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Firehorse

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First off ... Don't care. As pointed out, they will be crap holes within a year. Secondly, that the base cost so many billions of dollars is great, but bases of this type are not movable, unless we planned to stay there forever, the Iraqis were going to get it anyway.

Maybe they will enjoy sitting on a $10K toilet seat, I know when I was serving the toilet seat didn't feel like it was worth it.
 

Seawytch

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Actually, I dont remember that. I remember specifically being told that it would take a while and cost alot. Silly me.
You don't remember this?

"It's hard to conceive that it would take more forces to provide stability in post-Saddam Iraq than it would take to conduct the war itself," and "The oil revenue of that country could bring between 50 and 100 billion dollars over the course of the next two or three years. We're dealing with a country that could really finance its own reconstruction, and relatively soon."
 

editec

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Remember the days when we were told that Iraqi reconstruction would only cost the American taxpayers about a billion dollars and that Iraqi oil revenue would pay for the rest? Why didn't the contracts specify that Iraq would have to at least partially reimburse the US for construction costs if we turned the bases and equipment over to them.

We had two CEOs as president and VP? What a joke!

Those bases didn't come cheap. Construction costs exceeded $2.4 billion, according to an analysis of Pentagon annual reports by the Congressional Research Service. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers alone was responsible for $1.9 billion in base construction contracts between 2004 and 2010, a spokesman told HuffPost.

It wasn't until late in Bush's second term that "cooler heads prevailed," Hurlburt said, and it became apparent that there was no political will in either country for the U.S. to keep permanent bases in Iraq, and therefore no need to spend so much to build them.

But by then, the plans had already been set in motion. As Stars and Stripes reported last year, major construction continued even after November 2008, when then-President George W. Bush and Iraqi officials signed a security agreement calling for all U.S. troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

Most of the $2.4 billion was spent building about a dozen huge outposts that, in addition to containing air strips and massive fortifications also have all the comforts of home. The Al-Asad Airfield in Anbar province, for example, covers 25 square miles -- about the size of Boulder, Colo. -- and is known as "Camp Cupcake" due to its amenities.

The 15-square-mile Joint Base Balad, as Whitney Terrell wrote earlier this year for Slate, is "home to three football-field-sized chow halls, a 25-meter swimming pool, a high dive, a football field, a softball field, two full-service gyms, a squash court, a movie theater, and the U.S. military's largest airfield in Iraq."

U.S. To Hand Over Iraq Bases, Equipment Worth Billions
As long as those international constuction companies we over-paid to build them are happy...

 

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