What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

The dangers of distrust, how Chavez "won" Venezuela- Limiting Electoral Observation, Promoting Disinformation, Disenfranchising Voters etc.

shockedcanadian

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2012
Messages
15,999
Reaction score
13,558
Points
2,405
BBC wrote an article today about the fact that America NOT counting the votes in one night is dangerous to their reputation. Most certainly, you are asking a hell of a lot for ANY citizen, anywhere, to trust you to defend and be honest with votes, days after they cast it. Especially in this hyper-partisan political time. People will assume, new, added votes, DAYS after the election. It's insane.

The dangers are obvious. Going further, too many issues we have seen are in line with how Hugo Chavez operated. This article outlines a few vital issues. All of this was present without mail out voting. It's a real danger, and I hope you all figure it out because the long term implications are difficult to measure.


The Chávez Strategy, Step 4: Prevail on Election Day
On October 7, as much as 80 percent of the roughly 18 million registered voters will visit 14,035 polling centers and 38,500 polling stations, many in districts that are deeply loyal to Chávez. Also on October 7, the regime will deploy its final set of measures.

Winning Over the Electoral Tribunal. The five-member Consejo Nacional Electoral (CNE) is dominated by pro-Chávez members who have managed to salvage a partial reputation for neutrality and objectivity.[57] The CNE is credited for overseeing the referendum that Chávez lost in December 2007 and not altering the strong showing of the opposition in the 2010 legislative elections. Despite that, however, its impartiality is in question. Critics maintain that the CNE bends far too easily to the will of the president. In a close contest, it is far from certain that the CNE would be able to resist pressure applied by Chávez and his supporters.

Presuming Victory. The Chávez propaganda machine consistently claims that Chávez’s polling lead is insurmountable. In June, Chávez forecast a win with 60 percent of the vote.[58] On August 15, Chávez proclaimed that “it would be easier for 100 camels to pass through the eye of a needle than for [the capitalist class] to win the election” and later claimed he will win by 70 percent.[59] Supporters touted an August poll prepared by Jesse Chacon, an associate and former minister under Chávez, claiming that the incumbent leads with 56 percent among those with the intention to vote, as opposed to 29 percent for Capriles.[60] With campaign messaging, a number of friendly polls, and extensive media influence, Chávez seeks to project a confident air of electoral invincibility all the way to October 7.

Questioning Secrecy of the Vote. The Venezuelan system of electronic voting, according to the country’s electoral specialists, is protected against tampering. But voting machines are connected to an anti-fraud authentication system that requires a registered fingerprint to activate. Many Venezuelans harbor concerns about the system and the privacy of their ballots. Doubts about the secrecy of the ballot could scare voters, especially opposition voters, away from the polls.

Limiting Electoral Observation. Following the 2006 presidential election, Venezuela ended serious electoral observation missions by the OAS, the European Union, and other groups, such as the Carter Center in the U.S. The CNE now allows only electoral “companions” invited primarily from friendly groups such as the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR), which is currently led by a Venezuelan chavista, Alí Rodriguez Araque. Since these companions arrive mere days before elections and take tours of polling places escorted by Venezuelan authorities who are also charged with preapproving their statements or reports, the electoral companions lack international credibility.[61] On October 7, allegations of voting improprieties or fraud will lack validation by impartial external observers.

Cheating and Disenfranchising Voters. Opposition experts have expressed concerns about the lack of a comprehensive audit of the voting register and about the ease with which voter identifications have been issued, possibly resulting in duplicate voter documents and noncitizens being able to vote. On October 7, the geographic distribution of polling stations—with higher numbers in pro-Chávez strongholds—and overcrowding and inefficiency in processing registered voters will affect voting. Obstructionism by Chávez-friendly officials and potential intimidation by pro-Chávez bullies could slow or negate votes in many districts.

Venezuela permits voting overseas in embassies and consulates. However, following the expulsion of Venezuela’s consul general in Miami in January 2012, Chávez ordered the consulate closed. Despite appeals, he has refused to reopen it in order to punish the Venezuelan diaspora—as many as 20,000—in Florida. To exercise their right to vote, they must travel to the nearest open consulate in New Orleans.

Promoting Disinformation.The Chávez regime plants stories about alleged opposition plans to contest the election outcome and disrupt the post-electoral civil order. On August 9, Chávez announced that a “mercenary” carrying a U.S. passport had been arrested in Venezuela, adding matter of factly that “a group of the bourgeoisie is preparing to reject the people’s triumph…and [will] try to plunge the country into a political crisis and fill the country with violence.”[62]

October Surprise. Despite the four-step Chávez strategy outlined above, opposition candidate Capriles, the MUD, and millions of Venezuelans sincerely believe that they still have a real opportunity to win and alter the course of Venezuelan history. The hopes of the opposition have recently been bolstered by reputable polling data that place Capriles either ahead of or closing the gap between himself and Chávez.[63] Emergent crises such as the August PDVSA refinery fire, the collapse of key bridges, and restiveness in some labor unions have also tarnished the aura of triumph that Chávez had aimed to project.[64]
 
Last edited:

Blackrook

Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
19,971
Reaction score
9,133
Points
940
They will round us up and shoot us if they think they can get away with it.
 

Toro

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2005
Messages
89,078
Reaction score
27,519
Points
2,250
Location
Surfing the Oceans of Liquidity
Yeah, the only thing different between Trump and Chavez is ideology.

They are both narcissistic authoritarians brought to power by the working class, who sow disinformation, attack institutions, hate democracy, think they have a God given right to power, spin bizarre conspiracy theories, and governed chaotically.
 

SassyIrishLass

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2009
Messages
71,916
Reaction score
33,488
Points
2,290
Yeah, the only thing different between Trump and Chavez is ideology.

They are both narcissistic authoritarians brought to power by the working class, who sow disinformation, attack institutions, hate democracy, think they have a God given right to power, spin bizarre conspiracy theories, and governed chaotically.

Yo blowhard, how's Venezuela doing these days?
 
OP
shockedcanadian

shockedcanadian

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2012
Messages
15,999
Reaction score
13,558
Points
2,405
Yeah, the only thing different between Trump and Chavez is ideology.

They are both narcissistic authoritarians brought to power by the working class, who sow disinformation, attack institutions, hate democracy, think they have a God given right to power, spin bizarre conspiracy theories, and governed chaotically.

Let me know the next time Trump invades another country with someone elses kids or starts taxing you to hell or trying to nationalize everything (hey, I wonder which ideology pushes that?).

WHo cares if he is an egomanic? Every politician is. Obama or Harris? Bush? Romney? You feel warm and fuzzy at their modesty and love of country and believe it's such beautiful loving language?

Trump has pissed people off. Small, weak, soft people. To hell with them. They've been so wrong about so much for so long citizens would rather listen to a blowhard who gets things done in their interests rather than the Open Border, China First sobs.

Trump says plenty of things I don't necessarily like, but, I judge people by actions, not words.
 
Last edited:

LordBrownTrout

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2007
Messages
34,266
Reaction score
13,799
Points
1,590
Location
South Texas Republic
Yep, do this for two or three elections. Apathy sets in, trust disappears, communism is born again to the idiots who thought......."this time will be different because we got our people in there".
 

Tipsycatlover

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
51,828
Reaction score
25,282
Points
2,330
Joe Biden is our Hugo Chavez
 

Ray9

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
2,103
Reaction score
3,379
Points
1,970
Trump shook up a nest of bees in the state and they took control of an election to get rid of him.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$142.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top