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Swing State Early Voter Thread

Who are you voting for in the early voting in your swing state early?


  • Total voters
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  • Poll closed .

Mustang

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This is a thread dedicated to people who are voting early (either by going to the polls or sending in absentee ballots) in the various swing states. If you vote, please specify your state in a response. Votes will be made public solely to minimize those fraudulent voters who, while they may have valid state IDs, might be known to live in a state other than one of the very few that's still considered to be in play.

As for me, I'm in Colorado, and today I voted for Obama. That's probably no surprise to most people. And I could offer a number of pro Obama reasons and just as many anti Romney reasons, but I'll sum up my anti Romney reasons below and just leave it at that.

Four years after the financial meltdown, I'm NOT going to vote for a former manager/director of a private equity fund who parks his money overseas, won't show the American people his taxes and then asks everyone to 'trust him' when he won't spell out the exemptions he say's he's planning to eliminate in order to lower tax rates further still even as we have massive deficits and debt. After all, Reagan DID say that we should trust BUT verify, and I don't see any reason to hold American politicians less accountable than I would hold an auto repairman.

As an aside, I was surprised to find out that there were 16 separate people on the Colorado ballot running for president. I wonder if that's going to gum up the works...
 
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bigrebnc1775

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Bumping for early voters in swing states, assuming there are any.

We have had a record turn out in North Carolina close to a million
an d most in front of me which I had to wait in a very long line were not obama supporters.
 
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OODA_Loop

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This is the first time I have ever given money to a political candidate, put a sign in my yard and I am about to go to rally tonight.
 
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Foxfyre

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In past years I could have voted as New Mexico was a battleground state, but I don't think we qualify as a swing state now. Most analyists have us solidly blue. However, I will likely be voting early and will vote Romney.
 

bigrebnc1775

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CaféAuLait

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This is a thread dedicated to people who are voting early (either by going to the polls or sending in absentee ballots) in the various swing states. If you vote, please specify your state in a response. Votes will be made public solely to minimize those fraudulent voters who, while they may have valid state IDs, might be known to live in a state other than one of the very few that's still considered to be in play.

As for me, I'm in Colorado, and today I voted for Obama. That's probably no surprise to most people. And I could offer a number of pro Obama reasons and just as many anti Romney reasons, but I'll sum up my anti Romney reasons below and just leave it at that.

Four years after the financial meltdown, I'm NOT going to vote for a former manager/director of a private equity fund who parks his money overseas, won't show the American people his taxes and then asks everyone to 'trust him' when he won't spell out the exemptions he say's he's planning to eliminate in order to lower tax rates further still even as we have massive deficits and debt. After all, Reagan DID say that we should trust BUT verify, and I don't see any reason to hold American politicians less accountable than I would hold an auto repairman.

As an aside, I was surprised to find out that there were 16 separate people on the Colorado ballot running for president. I wonder if that's going to gum up the works...

16? Wow.
 

CaféAuLait

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This is a thread dedicated to people who are voting early (either by going to the polls or sending in absentee ballots) in the various swing states. If you vote, please specify your state in a response. Votes will be made public solely to minimize those fraudulent voters who, while they may have valid state IDs, might be known to live in a state other than one of the very few that's still considered to be in play.

As for me, I'm in Colorado, and today I voted for Obama. That's probably no surprise to most people. And I could offer a number of pro Obama reasons and just as many anti Romney reasons, but I'll sum up my anti Romney reasons below and just leave it at that.

Four years after the financial meltdown, I'm NOT going to vote for a former manager/director of a private equity fund who parks his money overseas, won't show the American people his taxes and then asks everyone to 'trust him' when he won't spell out the exemptions he say's he's planning to eliminate in order to lower tax rates further still even as we have massive deficits and debt. After all, Reagan DID say that we should trust BUT verify, and I don't see any reason to hold American politicians less accountable than I would hold an auto repairman.

As an aside, I was surprised to find out that there were 16 separate people on the Colorado ballot running for president. I wonder if that's going to gum up the works...

To answer you poll question, I have voted but I live in a solid blue state.
 
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Mustang

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We have had a record turn out in North Carolina close to a million
an d most in front of me which I had to wait in a very long line were not obama supporters.

no real surprise there.

You should be North Carolina has a Democratic majority by at least a million in a half voters.

That doesn't necessarily mean anything considering the fact that normally just barely over (and sometimes under) 50% of eligible voters vote in presidential elections. If the US were to pass a compulsory voting law like Australia has, no doubt the outcomes of many elections, both state and federal, would be different. Sure, there might be some protest votes, but many states (and their citizens) might just find that the poorer, more apathetic voters who normally don't vote for a variety of reasons, could change the political landscape. Much to everyone's surprise, I'm sure.
 

bigrebnc1775

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no real surprise there.

You should be North Carolina has a Democratic majority by at least a million in a half voters.

That doesn't necessarily mean anything considering the fact that normally just barely over (and sometimes under) 50% of eligible voters vote in presidential elections. If the US were to pass a compulsory voting law like Australia has, no doubt the outcomes of many elections, both state and federal, would be different. Sure, there might be some protest votes, but many states (and their citizens) might just find that the poorer, more apathetic voters who normally don't vote for a variety of reasons, could change the political landscape. Much to everyone's surprise, I'm sure.

140 years of democrats controlling the state house and Senate should tell you something.
 

blackhawk

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bigrebnc1775

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Mustang

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You should be North Carolina has a Democratic majority by at least a million in a half voters.

That doesn't necessarily mean anything considering the fact that normally just barely over (and sometimes under) 50% of eligible voters vote in presidential elections. If the US were to pass a compulsory voting law like Australia has, no doubt the outcomes of many elections, both state and federal, would be different. Sure, there might be some protest votes, but many states (and their citizens) might just find that the poorer, more apathetic voters who normally don't vote for a variety of reasons, could change the political landscape. Much to everyone's surprise, I'm sure.

140 years of democrats controlling the state house and Senate should tell you something.

Democrats controlled much of the state houses in the South for several decades following the Civil War. Johnson changed the political landscape when, as a Southerner himself, he embraced and pushed for civil rights legislation to be passed in the aftermath of Kennedy's assassination.
 

buckeye45_73

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That doesn't necessarily mean anything considering the fact that normally just barely over (and sometimes under) 50% of eligible voters vote in presidential elections. If the US were to pass a compulsory voting law like Australia has, no doubt the outcomes of many elections, both state and federal, would be different. Sure, there might be some protest votes, but many states (and their citizens) might just find that the poorer, more apathetic voters who normally don't vote for a variety of reasons, could change the political landscape. Much to everyone's surprise, I'm sure.

140 years of democrats controlling the state house and Senate should tell you something.

Democrats controlled much of the state houses in the South for several decades following the Civil War. Johnson changed the political landscape when, as a Southerner himself, he embraced and pushed for civil rights legislation to be passed in the aftermath of Kennedy's assassination.

Uh you understate that, TN just went republican in the state legislature....guess all those dixiecrats didnt turn republican....thanks to carpetbaggers like me, we're knocking out the old democrat good ole boys network .
 
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140 years of democrats controlling the state house and Senate should tell you something.

Democrats controlled much of the state houses in the South for several decades following the Civil War. Johnson changed the political landscape when, as a Southerner himself, he embraced and pushed for civil rights legislation to be passed in the aftermath of Kennedy's assassination.

Uh you understate that, TN just went republican in the state legislature....guess all those dixiecrats didnt turn republican....thanks to carpetbaggers like me, we're knocking out the old democrat good ole boys network .

Check out old electoral maps some time just for giggles. Here's the one from 1916. Notice anything?

United States presidential election, 1916 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

bigrebnc1775

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That doesn't necessarily mean anything considering the fact that normally just barely over (and sometimes under) 50% of eligible voters vote in presidential elections. If the US were to pass a compulsory voting law like Australia has, no doubt the outcomes of many elections, both state and federal, would be different. Sure, there might be some protest votes, but many states (and their citizens) might just find that the poorer, more apathetic voters who normally don't vote for a variety of reasons, could change the political landscape. Much to everyone's surprise, I'm sure.

140 years of democrats controlling the state house and Senate should tell you something.

Democrats controlled much of the state houses in the South for several decades following the Civil War. Johnson changed the political landscape when, as a Southerner himself, he embraced and pushed for civil rights legislation to be passed in the aftermath of Kennedy's assassination.
As for North Carolina we aren't talking about several decades, 140 years is what we're talking about.
 

Seawytch

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CaféAuLait;6234424 said:
This is a thread dedicated to people who are voting early (either by going to the polls or sending in absentee ballots) in the various swing states. If you vote, please specify your state in a response. Votes will be made public solely to minimize those fraudulent voters who, while they may have valid state IDs, might be known to live in a state other than one of the very few that's still considered to be in play.

As for me, I'm in Colorado, and today I voted for Obama. That's probably no surprise to most people. And I could offer a number of pro Obama reasons and just as many anti Romney reasons, but I'll sum up my anti Romney reasons below and just leave it at that.

Four years after the financial meltdown, I'm NOT going to vote for a former manager/director of a private equity fund who parks his money overseas, won't show the American people his taxes and then asks everyone to 'trust him' when he won't spell out the exemptions he say's he's planning to eliminate in order to lower tax rates further still even as we have massive deficits and debt. After all, Reagan DID say that we should trust BUT verify, and I don't see any reason to hold American politicians less accountable than I would hold an auto repairman.

As an aside, I was surprised to find out that there were 16 separate people on the Colorado ballot running for president. I wonder if that's going to gum up the works...

To answer you poll question, I have voted but I live in a solid blue state.

Same here. Voted 10/10 because we were too busy on the first day 10/9. We were open today but I haven't checked the numbers yet. It was a steady flow of people though all day.
 

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