Statehood for Kurds?

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Statehood for Kurds?



The Baghdad newspaper Sabah published a surprising article a few weeks ago. Its editor, Abd Jabbar Shabbout, suggested it was time to settle the "age-old problem" between Iraq's Arabs and Kurds by establishing a "Kurdish state." Never before had I heard such a once-heretical view so publicly expressed in any Arab quarter. And this was no ordinary quarter: Sabah is the mouthpiece of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki. Shabbout went on to suggest a negotiated "ending of the Arab-Kurdish partnership in a peaceful way."

He called his proposal Plan B, Plan A being the "dialogue" between Iraq's central government and the Kurdish regional government in northern Iraq that emerged after the fall of Saddam Hussein.

But Plan A, he said, was getting nowhere. Differences over power and authority, oil and natural resources, territory and borders were so deep that the dialogue repeatedly failed. In December the Iraqi army and Kurdish peshmerga faced off in an atmosphere so tense, according to Shabbout, that hostilities could have broken out at any moment as a result of the slightest miscalculation.

And it wasn't only Shabbout, but Maliki himself, who warned that if war did break out it wouldn't be just a war between Kurdish rebels and Baghdad, as it used to be under Hussein, but an "ethnic war between Arabs and Kurds."

Could it be that the "Kurdish question" has reached another critical stage in its history, one that is intimately bound up with the region-wide cataclysm that is the "Arab Spring"?

The Kurds' destiny has always been shaped less by their own struggles than by the vagaries of regional and international politics, and the great Middle Eastern upheavals they periodically produce. With World War I and the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Britain and France promised the Kurds a state of their own, but then reneged. They fetched up as minorities, more or less severely repressed, in the four countries — Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria — among which their vast domains were divided. They repeatedly rebelled, especially in Iraq. But their rebellions were always crushed, the last one, under Hussein with the genocidal use of gas.

But the Kurds never ceased to dream of independent statehood. Their first breakthrough came after Hussein's megalomaniacal invasion of Kuwait in 1990, when an internationally protected Kurdish "safe haven" was established in northern Iraq, which enabled them to take their first state-building steps in the shape of a regional assembly and a degree of self-government.
Iraqi Kurds may be on the brink of a statehood breakthrough - latimes.com
 

Kurdistani4ever

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The entire Middle East must be free, otherwise the wars will never stop. But apparently some people (Pretty much everyone except Kurds and Balochis) Refuses to accept peace.

But back to the topix. I believe, this picture shows the situation of Iraq quite well:
 
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The entire Middle East must be free, otherwise the wars will never stop. But apparently some people (Pretty much everyone except Kurds and Balochis) Refuses to accept peace.

But back to the topix. I believe, this picture shows the situation of Iraq quite well:
I am ok with that map.
 

Kurdistani4ever

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The entire Middle East must be free, otherwise the wars will never stop. But apparently some people (Pretty much everyone except Kurds and Balochis) Refuses to accept peace.

But back to the topix. I believe, this picture shows the situation of Iraq quite well:
I am ok with that map.
Obviously Kurdistan is too big on that map. It's just to show the division of Iraq:cool:
 

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In my opinion they should give the Nineve valley to the Assyrians, at the very least some sort of autonomous self rule. Let the rest split as they wish.
 

Sunni Man

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The Kurds are secret friends of Israel and cannot be trusted.

The zionists want to have a jew friendly state to further their ME agenda of divide and conquer .......... :cool:
 

Kurdistani4ever

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The Kurds are secret friends of Israel and cannot be trusted.

The zionists want to have a jew friendly state to further their ME agenda of divide and conquer .......... :cool:
Wow! You seem to be quite a paranoid guy;) We Kurds respect everybody that respects us back, doesn't matter whenever they are muslims, christians, jews, Buddists etc. If respecting humans despite differences makes us bad guys, then i really think, you should lock yourself up in a room and rethink your life.

But with such meaningless hate, i can see how the new Middle East will be a nightmare for you, especially a Kurdistan located in the most important location of this region. And remember: Iraq is only the first part. "Iraqi" Kurdistan is only a small part of the full homeland:cool:
 
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Statehood for Kurds?



The Baghdad newspaper Sabah published a surprising article a few weeks ago. Its editor, Abd Jabbar Shabbout, suggested it was time to settle the "age-old problem" between Iraq's Arabs and Kurds by establishing a "Kurdish state." Never before had I heard such a once-heretical view so publicly expressed in any Arab quarter. And this was no ordinary quarter: Sabah is the mouthpiece of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki. Shabbout went on to suggest a negotiated "ending of the Arab-Kurdish partnership in a peaceful way."

He called his proposal Plan B, Plan A being the "dialogue" between Iraq's central government and the Kurdish regional government in northern Iraq that emerged after the fall of Saddam Hussein.

But Plan A, he said, was getting nowhere. Differences over power and authority, oil and natural resources, territory and borders were so deep that the dialogue repeatedly failed. In December the Iraqi army and Kurdish peshmerga faced off in an atmosphere so tense, according to Shabbout, that hostilities could have broken out at any moment as a result of the slightest miscalculation.

And it wasn't only Shabbout, but Maliki himself, who warned that if war did break out it wouldn't be just a war between Kurdish rebels and Baghdad, as it used to be under Hussein, but an "ethnic war between Arabs and Kurds."

Could it be that the "Kurdish question" has reached another critical stage in its history, one that is intimately bound up with the region-wide cataclysm that is the "Arab Spring"?

The Kurds' destiny has always been shaped less by their own struggles than by the vagaries of regional and international politics, and the great Middle Eastern upheavals they periodically produce. With World War I and the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Britain and France promised the Kurds a state of their own, but then reneged. They fetched up as minorities, more or less severely repressed, in the four countries — Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria — among which their vast domains were divided. They repeatedly rebelled, especially in Iraq. But their rebellions were always crushed, the last one, under Hussein with the genocidal use of gas.

But the Kurds never ceased to dream of independent statehood. Their first breakthrough came after Hussein's megalomaniacal invasion of Kuwait in 1990, when an internationally protected Kurdish "safe haven" was established in northern Iraq, which enabled them to take their first state-building steps in the shape of a regional assembly and a degree of self-government.
Iraqi Kurds may be on the brink of a statehood breakthrough - latimes.com
I hope they get it.

The only people that arabs want to kill as much as jews are kurds.
 

Sunni Man

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The Kurds are secret friends of Israel and cannot be trusted.

The zionists want to have a jew friendly state to further their ME agenda of divide and conquer .......... :cool:
yeah, so.

Kurds want to be free.

You got an issue with freedom?
Yea, let the Kurds move to Israel like the Druze did ....... :cool:
 

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Kurdistani4ever

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The Kurds are secret friends of Israel and cannot be trusted.

The zionists want to have a jew friendly state to further their ME agenda of divide and conquer .......... :cool:
yeah, so.

Kurds want to be free.

You got an issue with freedom?
Yea, let the Kurds move to Israel like the Druze did ....... :cool:
What? We live on our ancestral lands, and we refuse to leave our homeland, for your terrorist states to get hyped. We will always stay here, if you don't like this, then hate like hell.

There will be a day, when we remove the flags of the occupiers and raise our own.
 
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Maryland

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The entire Middle East must be free, otherwise the wars will never stop. But apparently some people (Pretty much everyone except Kurds and Balochis) Refuses to accept peace.

But back to the topix. I believe, this picture shows the situation of Iraq quite well:
Israel is the only country in the Middle East supporting the Kurds.
 

RoccoR

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Missourian, et al,

They don't necessarily oppose a Kurdish State.

Why does Turkey forcefully oppose a Kurdish State?
(COMMENT)

They oppose the creation an autonomous region and cultural rights for ethnic Kurds inside Turkish sovereignty.

Most Respectfully,
R
 

Kurdistani4ever

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Missourian, et al,

They don't necessarily oppose a Kurdish State.

Why does Turkey forcefully oppose a Kurdish State?
(COMMENT)

They oppose the creation an autonomous region and cultural rights for ethnic Kurds inside Turkish sovereignty.

Most Respectfully,
R
So now sovereignty is the same as occupation? As far as i can tell, almost one third of Turkeys population are Kurds, so calling it "Turkish sovereignty" is more than just a simple insult.
 
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The Kurds deserve their own country, point blank period.
 

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