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Shifting Demographics and the Stratification of Political Alignments.

schmidlap

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Hoopla aside, the undeniable trends are interesting.
The new Pew data, like the earlier 2020 assessments, underscore the durability of what I’ve called “the class inversion” in each party’s base...
The class inversion hit a new peak in 2016, with Hillary Clinton running at least 15 points better among college than noncollege white voters in most of the major data sources (including a breathtaking 27 points better in Pew’s assessment). In 2020, Catalist and the exit polls showed the gap widening, while Pew found it slightly narrowing, but the class inversion remained enormous in all three; each study also found Biden winning a majority of college-educated white voters...
Those gains were central to his strong showing in white-collar suburbs around major cities. He was especially strong among college-educated white women...
And while white people without a college degree have been steadily shrinking as a share of the vote, these college-educated white people have slightly grown since 2004 (from about 28 percent to 31 percent of the electorate, per the census). Especially valuable for Democrats: They are highly reliable midterm voters...
Pew’s study found that Biden won 92 percent of Black voters last year, and the other major data sources gave him only slightly smaller shares...
Asian Americans, the fastest-growing nonwhite community, also look solid for Democrats...
Hispanics, though, could be emerging as a wild card. Pew put Biden’s vote among Hispanics at only 59 percent...
Both Pew and Catalist found that the racially diverse, well-educated, and highly secular Millennials (born from 1981 through 1996) and Generation Z (born from 1997 through 2014) cast almost 30 percent of the votes last year, up substantially from 23 percent in 2016. Both sources also found Democrats winning about three-fifths of the votes from those two generations combined....
A big challenge for Democrats is that the broad demographic changes favoring them—growing racial diversity, rising education levels, increasing numbers of secular adults not affiliated with organized religion—are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Adding to that challenge: The two-senators-per-state rule and Electoral College magnify the political influence of smaller interior states least affected by these trends (particularly the increase in racial diversity). Red-state Republicans are moving to systemically reinforce those advantages with the most aggressive wave of laws restricting access to the ballot since before the Voting Rights Act in 1965, and they are gearing up for equally aggressive gerrymanders of state legislative and congressional districts in states they control.
Conversely, the preponderantly white Baby Boomer generation, which has aged from its 1960s roots into a Republican-leaning cohort, is receding..
“Young people are very turned off by the racism, by the climate deniers, so everything they are doing to solidify their base, and everything they are doing to try to win 2022, is digging them into a deeper hole for 2024 with young voters.”
 

TheParser

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Yes, demographics are changing the nation, which will be unrecognizable by the middle of the next century (if not earlier).

For the sake of the nation, I wish the best of luck to those states that are trying their best to make sure that only citizens vote and vote only once.
 

Oddball

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Hoopla aside, the undeniable trends are interesting.
The new Pew data, like the earlier 2020 assessments, underscore the durability of what I’ve called “the class inversion” in each party’s base...
The class inversion hit a new peak in 2016, with Hillary Clinton running at least 15 points better among college than noncollege white voters in most of the major data sources (including a breathtaking 27 points better in Pew’s assessment). In 2020, Catalist and the exit polls showed the gap widening, while Pew found it slightly narrowing, but the class inversion remained enormous in all three; each study also found Biden winning a majority of college-educated white voters...
Those gains were central to his strong showing in white-collar suburbs around major cities. He was especially strong among college-educated white women...
And while white people without a college degree have been steadily shrinking as a share of the vote, these college-educated white people have slightly grown since 2004 (from about 28 percent to 31 percent of the electorate, per the census). Especially valuable for Democrats: They are highly reliable midterm voters...
Pew’s study found that Biden won 92 percent of Black voters last year, and the other major data sources gave him only slightly smaller shares...
Asian Americans, the fastest-growing nonwhite community, also look solid for Democrats...
Hispanics, though, could be emerging as a wild card. Pew put Biden’s vote among Hispanics at only 59 percent...
Both Pew and Catalist found that the racially diverse, well-educated, and highly secular Millennials (born from 1981 through 1996) and Generation Z (born from 1997 through 2014) cast almost 30 percent of the votes last year, up substantially from 23 percent in 2016. Both sources also found Democrats winning about three-fifths of the votes from those two generations combined....
A big challenge for Democrats is that the broad demographic changes favoring them—growing racial diversity, rising education levels, increasing numbers of secular adults not affiliated with organized religion—are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Adding to that challenge: The two-senators-per-state rule and Electoral College magnify the political influence of smaller interior states least affected by these trends (particularly the increase in racial diversity). Red-state Republicans are moving to systemically reinforce those advantages with the most aggressive wave of laws restricting access to the ballot since before the Voting Rights Act in 1965, and they are gearing up for equally aggressive gerrymanders of state legislative and congressional districts in states they control.
Conversely, the preponderantly white Baby Boomer generation, which has aged from its 1960s roots into a Republican-leaning cohort, is receding..
“Young people are very turned off by the racism, by the climate deniers, so everything they are doing to solidify their base, and everything they are doing to try to win 2022, is digging them into a deeper hole for 2024 with young voters.”
You liberoidal schmendricks have been peddling this racist trope since the late 1990s....Fact is that blacks and latinos voted republican in 2020, in greater numbers than they had since Nixon.

Your *ahem* assumption that voting patterns can easily be determined by skin color reveals your poorly veiled racist proclivities.
 

theHawk

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Hoopla aside, the undeniable trends are interesting.
The new Pew data, like the earlier 2020 assessments, underscore the durability of what I’ve called “the class inversion” in each party’s base...
The class inversion hit a new peak in 2016, with Hillary Clinton running at least 15 points better among college than noncollege white voters in most of the major data sources (including a breathtaking 27 points better in Pew’s assessment). In 2020, Catalist and the exit polls showed the gap widening, while Pew found it slightly narrowing, but the class inversion remained enormous in all three; each study also found Biden winning a majority of college-educated white voters...
Those gains were central to his strong showing in white-collar suburbs around major cities. He was especially strong among college-educated white women...
And while white people without a college degree have been steadily shrinking as a share of the vote, these college-educated white people have slightly grown since 2004 (from about 28 percent to 31 percent of the electorate, per the census). Especially valuable for Democrats: They are highly reliable midterm voters...
Pew’s study found that Biden won 92 percent of Black voters last year, and the other major data sources gave him only slightly smaller shares...
Asian Americans, the fastest-growing nonwhite community, also look solid for Democrats...
Hispanics, though, could be emerging as a wild card. Pew put Biden’s vote among Hispanics at only 59 percent...
Both Pew and Catalist found that the racially diverse, well-educated, and highly secular Millennials (born from 1981 through 1996) and Generation Z (born from 1997 through 2014) cast almost 30 percent of the votes last year, up substantially from 23 percent in 2016. Both sources also found Democrats winning about three-fifths of the votes from those two generations combined....
A big challenge for Democrats is that the broad demographic changes favoring them—growing racial diversity, rising education levels, increasing numbers of secular adults not affiliated with organized religion—are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Adding to that challenge: The two-senators-per-state rule and Electoral College magnify the political influence of smaller interior states least affected by these trends (particularly the increase in racial diversity). Red-state Republicans are moving to systemically reinforce those advantages with the most aggressive wave of laws restricting access to the ballot since before the Voting Rights Act in 1965, and they are gearing up for equally aggressive gerrymanders of state legislative and congressional districts in states they control.
Conversely, the preponderantly white Baby Boomer generation, which has aged from its 1960s roots into a Republican-leaning cohort, is receding..
“Young people are very turned off by the racism, by the climate deniers, so everything they are doing to solidify their base, and everything they are doing to try to win 2022, is digging them into a deeper hole for 2024 with young voters.”

I always find it amusing how lefties always boast about supposedly winning the “college whites” versus whites with no college. Yet they never talk about how they win the blacks without college or Hispanics without college.

Why the obsession of “college whites”? Why don’t they talk about minorities in this way? It’s almost as if they are saying the cream of the crop in this country are college whites, and no one else.
 

Oddball

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Hoopla aside, the undeniable trends are interesting.
The new Pew data, like the earlier 2020 assessments, underscore the durability of what I’ve called “the class inversion” in each party’s base...
The class inversion hit a new peak in 2016, with Hillary Clinton running at least 15 points better among college than noncollege white voters in most of the major data sources (including a breathtaking 27 points better in Pew’s assessment). In 2020, Catalist and the exit polls showed the gap widening, while Pew found it slightly narrowing, but the class inversion remained enormous in all three; each study also found Biden winning a majority of college-educated white voters...
Those gains were central to his strong showing in white-collar suburbs around major cities. He was especially strong among college-educated white women...
And while white people without a college degree have been steadily shrinking as a share of the vote, these college-educated white people have slightly grown since 2004 (from about 28 percent to 31 percent of the electorate, per the census). Especially valuable for Democrats: They are highly reliable midterm voters...
Pew’s study found that Biden won 92 percent of Black voters last year, and the other major data sources gave him only slightly smaller shares...
Asian Americans, the fastest-growing nonwhite community, also look solid for Democrats...
Hispanics, though, could be emerging as a wild card. Pew put Biden’s vote among Hispanics at only 59 percent...
Both Pew and Catalist found that the racially diverse, well-educated, and highly secular Millennials (born from 1981 through 1996) and Generation Z (born from 1997 through 2014) cast almost 30 percent of the votes last year, up substantially from 23 percent in 2016. Both sources also found Democrats winning about three-fifths of the votes from those two generations combined....
A big challenge for Democrats is that the broad demographic changes favoring them—growing racial diversity, rising education levels, increasing numbers of secular adults not affiliated with organized religion—are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Adding to that challenge: The two-senators-per-state rule and Electoral College magnify the political influence of smaller interior states least affected by these trends (particularly the increase in racial diversity). Red-state Republicans are moving to systemically reinforce those advantages with the most aggressive wave of laws restricting access to the ballot since before the Voting Rights Act in 1965, and they are gearing up for equally aggressive gerrymanders of state legislative and congressional districts in states they control.
Conversely, the preponderantly white Baby Boomer generation, which has aged from its 1960s roots into a Republican-leaning cohort, is receding..
“Young people are very turned off by the racism, by the climate deniers, so everything they are doing to solidify their base, and everything they are doing to try to win 2022, is digging them into a deeper hole for 2024 with young voters.”

I always find it amusing how lefties always boast about supposedly winning the “college whites” versus whites with no college. Yet they never talk about how they win the blacks without college or Hispanics without college.

Why the obsession of “college whites”? Why don’t they talk about minorities in this way? It’s almost as if they are saying the cream of the crop in this country are college whites, and no one else.
The fitting theme of leftist snobbery sure does fit into a number of threads today.
 

Dogmaphobe

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Yes, Demographics are changing. That is why the Demagogic party is all about identity politics these days rather than principles or values.

Why teach anybody about American values when you can divide them into groups, convince them that they are victims, manipulate them into hating America and have them vote for you so you can make a fortune selling political influence like Biden and so many others have done?
 

Donald H

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Yes, Demographics are changing. That is why the Demagogic party is all about identity politics these days rather than principles or values.

Why teach anybody about American values when you can divide them into groups, convince them that they are victims, manipulate them into hating America and have them vote for you so you can make a fortune selling political influence like Biden and so many others have done?
The American way is a failed system dogma my friend. Neither of your country's political parties are offering the obvious change that is needed.


From a Canadian outsider's POV, I would say give Trump another chance! It would be a diversion from reality for America, as China marches on to world supremacy on all fronts.
 

hunarcy

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Hoopla aside, the undeniable trends are interesting.
The new Pew data, like the earlier 2020 assessments, underscore the durability of what I’ve called “the class inversion” in each party’s base...
The class inversion hit a new peak in 2016, with Hillary Clinton running at least 15 points better among college than noncollege white voters in most of the major data sources (including a breathtaking 27 points better in Pew’s assessment). In 2020, Catalist and the exit polls showed the gap widening, while Pew found it slightly narrowing, but the class inversion remained enormous in all three; each study also found Biden winning a majority of college-educated white voters...
Those gains were central to his strong showing in white-collar suburbs around major cities. He was especially strong among college-educated white women...
And while white people without a college degree have been steadily shrinking as a share of the vote, these college-educated white people have slightly grown since 2004 (from about 28 percent to 31 percent of the electorate, per the census). Especially valuable for Democrats: They are highly reliable midterm voters...
Pew’s study found that Biden won 92 percent of Black voters last year, and the other major data sources gave him only slightly smaller shares...
Asian Americans, the fastest-growing nonwhite community, also look solid for Democrats...
Hispanics, though, could be emerging as a wild card. Pew put Biden’s vote among Hispanics at only 59 percent...
Both Pew and Catalist found that the racially diverse, well-educated, and highly secular Millennials (born from 1981 through 1996) and Generation Z (born from 1997 through 2014) cast almost 30 percent of the votes last year, up substantially from 23 percent in 2016. Both sources also found Democrats winning about three-fifths of the votes from those two generations combined....
A big challenge for Democrats is that the broad demographic changes favoring them—growing racial diversity, rising education levels, increasing numbers of secular adults not affiliated with organized religion—are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Adding to that challenge: The two-senators-per-state rule and Electoral College magnify the political influence of smaller interior states least affected by these trends (particularly the increase in racial diversity). Red-state Republicans are moving to systemically reinforce those advantages with the most aggressive wave of laws restricting access to the ballot since before the Voting Rights Act in 1965, and they are gearing up for equally aggressive gerrymanders of state legislative and congressional districts in states they control.
Conversely, the preponderantly white Baby Boomer generation, which has aged from its 1960s roots into a Republican-leaning cohort, is receding..
“Young people are very turned off by the racism, by the climate deniers, so everything they are doing to solidify their base, and everything they are doing to try to win 2022, is digging them into a deeper hole for 2024 with young voters.”

I always find it amusing how lefties always boast about supposedly winning the “college whites” versus whites with no college. Yet they never talk about how they win the blacks without college or Hispanics without college.

Why the obsession of “college whites”? Why don’t they talk about minorities in this way? It’s almost as if they are saying the cream of the crop in this country are college whites, and no one else.

They are justifiably proud of the brain washing that their colleagues in the Universities have done to convince Students to embrace Marxism
 

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