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Our National Debt, spending addiction and deficit spending is problem 1

bripat9643

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Let's talk about those EV chargers. First, I think you are being a little pessimistic when you claim they will be outdated in five to eight years. What is going to take their place, we going to start driving solar powered cars? I live in a very rural area. The local high school is famously called the tractor school, mostly because they have tractor days every few months. Students drive their tractors to school and park them in the front of the school to display them. Some of the kids even drive riding lawnmowers. It is quite the sight. Not to mention what it does for traffic. I don't know anyone around here that drives an electric car, certainly don't see any Teslas.

But I have an hour commute to work. It is in one of the highest income areas of the state. My business has eight charging stations in the parking lot. When I roll in at six in the morning they are empty, but when I roll out in the afternoon at least half of them are occupied. I see multiple Teslas every single day. Do those living in rural areas not have the same right to access charging stations? Or broadband internet for that matter? That is what this bill provides.

But again, I don't believe you understand how Treasury bonds work. China can't recall those bonds. The only thing China can do is sell those bonds on the secondary market. Go for it, that only reduces the value of those bonds and then we can swoop in and buy them up on the cheap.
NO one has a right to a charging station, idiot. As Elon Musk pointed out "Does the government build gas stations? Then why should it build charging stations?"
 

Mac-7

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Except that there no significant welfare in the federal budget.

0nYEJ.jpg


That is because social security is not part of the federal budget, since it is self financing, and the main welfare like ADC and Disability, comes out of Social Security.
If you see Social Security in a listing of the federal budget, you can tell that is a fake listing, because social security is not paid for with general income tax money.
Post a link to your chart

because you have been serious lied to by someone

 

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Winston

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But here’s the thing Winston, let me ask you this, in your personal life do you believe it is good to have personal debt? Now for some reason, I am anticipating your response to include some type of justification for debt. Home mortgage is a common debt Americans take on and imo is usually justifiable. Cars? No. Toys and fun: boats, bikes, ski package vacations no. What say you Mr. Winston?

Btw- why did you have to use that phrase “There is a time for debt”! That’s not a good message! There might be little ones reading this board, you never know;) Inquiring minds are very adaptive, so let’s feed their growing minds with helpful advice not harmful!
Yes, I believe in debt. Like I said, there is a time and place for it. Cars, maybe they can be justified, better gas mileage for example can be use to make the payment. Housing, certainly, under the right circumstances. A television, doubtful. But come on, you are talking to a member of a former farming family. We used debt to seed our fields and fertilize our crops. Which brings me to another story that explains how things have changed. My father and I were talking about debt and I asked him, when your father borrowed money to plant a field, if the crop failed, was he expected to pay back the debt? You could see Dad's mind turning, he knew he was about to get trapped. He said, "No", that risk was on the bank. And then he knew it was coming, I asked, "How about today, if our crop fails are we expected to pay back the debt?" He was quiet for a moment, and then he mumbled, "Yes".

That is how our society has evolved, and not for the better. Take a car. Borrow money to buy a car and you might be asked to pay for something called "gap insurance". That is, if something happens to the car, like a wreck and a total loss, that insurance pays the difference between the value of the car and the outstanding loan balance. Crop insurance works the same way. And it is bullshit. The amount of risk taken by lenders is nothing like it used to be, and they charge just as much interest. I mean we have all been getting hosed for decades and it is time we took the initiative to change that. The first step is to send the Republican party to the scrap heap of history to join the Whigs.
 

Winston

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NO one has a right to a charging station, idiot. As Elon Musk pointed out "Does the government build gas stations? Then why should it build charging stations?"
This is not about a "right" you stupid shit. If charging stations were more available in rural areas would rural people buy more electric cars? Would that improve the environment and make our economy more efficient? I mean there are a lot of stupid posters here but you got to be about at the top of the list. And the Patriots SUCK.
 

ClaireH

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Let's talk about those EV chargers. First, I think you are being a little pessimistic when you claim they will be outdated in five to eight years. What is going to take their place, we going to start driving solar powered cars? I live in a very rural area. The local high school is famously called the tractor school, mostly because they have tractor days every few months. Students drive their tractors to school and park them in the front of the school to display them. Some of the kids even drive riding lawnmowers. It is quite the sight. Not to mention what it does for traffic. I don't know anyone around here that drives an electric car, certainly don't see any Teslas.

But I have an hour commute to work. It is in one of the highest income areas of the state. My business has eight charging stations in the parking lot. When I roll in at six in the morning they are empty, but when I roll out in the afternoon at least half of them are occupied. I see multiple Teslas every single day. Do those living in rural areas not have the same right to access charging stations? Or broadband internet for that matter? That is what this bill provides.

But again, I don't believe you understand how Treasury bonds work. China can't recall those bonds. The only thing China can do is sell those bonds on the secondary market. Go for it, that only reduces the value of those bonds and then we can swoop in and buy them up on the cheap.
By the time these 4 hour battery charges get an upgrade in performance (extended battery life), charging stations will need upgrades or full replacement. Let’s say a new invention comes along that doesn’t have anything to do with what we know now, regarding energy. It’s just a matter of time.

What is most clear is that inventions out in the market today will become relics of the past in a very short timeframe. As mentioned, developing means of transportation that have not even started will likely be made available in 5 years. That’s most impressive assuming safety requirements are fully met (unlike rushed fake vaccines).

So you see, you’re wrong to label me a pessimist, I prefer to be tagged a realist. What I’m mostly reacting to and impressed by is the exponential growth of technological advancement. Thousands upon thousands of new tech bursting out of the water daily!

Consumers will always prefer better options and the newest and latest gadgets available. Just think of the long lines of people standing for the newest iPhone for proof.

A majority of current drivers will not be going electric with current products. Americans expect better, after all, we’ve been conditioned for decades to always anticipate better.
 

bripat9643

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This is not about a "right" you stupid shit. If charging stations were more available in rural areas would rural people buy more electric cars? Would that improve the environment and make our economy more efficient? I mean there are a lot of stupid posters here but you got to be about at the top of the list. And the Patriots SUCK.
First you claim charging stations are a right, and then you deny that they are.

Make your mind up.
 

task0778

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This is not about a "right" you stupid shit. If charging stations were more available in rural areas would rural people buy more electric cars? Would that improve the environment and make our economy more efficient? I mean there are a lot of stupid posters here but you got to be about at the top of the list. And the Patriots SUCK.

Interesting questions, for which I do not have answers.

If charging stations were more available in rural areas would rural people buy more electric cars?

I'd say that quite a few people living in rural areas probably drive a truck, and some of them a bigger truck than a pickup. Them things cost a lotta money compared to a diesel, and I don't think they make big electric trucks yet. What about insurance and maintenance, which is more expensive? How well will an electric car/truck start and run in cold weather, both out in the boonies as well as in town? I useta own a Prius, and when it got cold you needed the gas engine to start the thing on a lotta mornings. A lot of the rural people will have to charge their electric car/truck from the home, so what does that do to their electric bill? And where does the power to generate electricity for those charging stations, wherever they are? Lotsa questions.


Would that improve the environment and make our economy more efficient?

Two more excellent questions. To be honest, I wouldn't trust the answer that a pro-EV person or a democrat would offer. I really don't think it will be possible to replace every gas or diesel car/truck anyway, for a very long time and even if that happened, I doubt the needle would be moved much for the environment or the economy. Like I said above, the power to charge EVs has to come from somewhere, and BTW how are those EVs produced in the first place? How are they transported to the dealerships? So what if we switch to EVs, you think the rest of the world can afford to do that?


It is simply amazing to me that the democrats think the US can afford to do this along with all the other green energy initiatives. There's no way you're going to get enough revenue from the rich guys and big corps, you're going to have to raise taxes on the middle class and even lower, but the Left doesn't seem to be honest with us about that. Awhile back there were estimates of $94 Trillion to pay for the GND. It is crazy to think the gov't can spend that kind of money without a negative economic impact, because they would have to borrow or print tons of money or raise taxes on everybody that matches or exceeds the highest tax rates around the world. It'd be one thing if everybody was told the true facts and we voted to do that, but I think we both know that will never happen. Why? Because the Left will never tell the truth about the real cost. About anything really.
 

Donald H

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Income inequality the buzz word for wealth redistribution.
It's not a case of 're' distribution.
It seems that a lot of Americans think that somebody earning great amounts of money has a right to keep it all to him/herself.
Would you have a dollar in your pocket if you didn't take it from somebody else? Maybe you earned it but others have a need and a right to earn other people's money too.

Just my thoughts on the issue but not a big deal that needs arguing.
 

Mac-7

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This is not about a "right" you stupid shit. If charging stations were more available in rural areas would rural people buy more electric cars? Would that improve the environment and make our economy more efficient? I mean there are a lot of stupid posters here but you got to be about at the top of the list. And the Patriots SUCK.
Dont expect pinhead government workers to replace what the private sector should be doing

if tesidents on rural areas demand electric cars and charging stations some private company will provide them
 

bripat9643

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It's not a case of 're' distribution.
It seems that a lot of Americans think that somebody earning great amounts of money has a right to keep it all to him/herself.
Actually, they do. What makes you believe that you have any right to it?

Would you have a dollar in your pocket if you didn't take it from somebody else? Maybe you earned it but others have a need and a right to earn other people's money too.
Yes I would. I didn't "'take" any of the dollars I posses. I earned them. I exchange my labor for cash. There was no "taking" involved.

Just my thoughts on the issue but not a big deal that needs arguing.
 

Donald H

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Actually, they do. What makes you believe that you have any right to it?
You have to be suggesting that the person who keeps all his money, doesn't employ and pay anybody else. If you have no interest in a rational discussion then I'll just leave it there with you.
 

bripat9643

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You have to be suggesting that the person who keeps all his money, doesn't employ and pay anybody else. If you have no interest in a rational discussion then I'll just leave it there with you.
It doesn't matter who I'm suggesting. You have a right to keep the money you earn through voluntary transactions, period. It doesn't matter if you employ anyone.

It appears you have no interest in any discussion unless all your premises have already been conceded.

You're an intellectual weasel and a coward.
 

Winston

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By the time these 4 hour battery charges get an upgrade in performance (extended battery life), charging stations will need upgrades or full replacement. Let’s say a new invention comes along that doesn’t have anything to do with what we know now, regarding energy. It’s just a matter of time.

What is most clear is that inventions out in the market today will become relics of the past in a very short timeframe. As mentioned, developing means of transportation that have not even started will likely be made available in 5 years. That’s most impressive assuming safety requirements are fully met (unlike rushed fake vaccines).

So you see, you’re wrong to label me a pessimist, I prefer to be tagged a realist. What I’m mostly reacting to and impressed by is the exponential growth of technological advancement. Thousands upon thousands of new tech bursting out of the water daily!

Consumers will always prefer better options and the newest and latest gadgets available. Just think of the long lines of people standing for the newest iPhone for proof.

A majority of current drivers will not be going electric with current products. Americans expect better, after all, we’ve been conditioned for decades to always anticipate better.
I believe charging stations are a lot like gas pumps. How long have they been around? Just off the top of my head, probably about a hundred years. I know we sold one when we sold off the farm assets and it had to be at least 70 years old. So charging stations are going to be around for a while. And I can appreciate your optimism, but I know this much. When the machine that makes M & M's breaks down, we ain't going to have M & M's anymore. I have often said, I would trade away all the new technology we have discovered to get back all the technology we have forgot. There are countless products being produced today, and I mentioned M & M's because the candy industry is teeming with them, that engineers have no damn idea how to create the machine doing the producing.
 

ClaireH

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I believe charging stations are a lot like gas pumps. How long have they been around? Just off the top of my head, probably about a hundred years. I know we sold one when we sold off the farm assets and it had to be at least 70 years old. So charging stations are going to be around for a while. And I can appreciate your optimism, but I know this much. When the machine that makes M & M's breaks down, we ain't going to have M & M's anymore. I have often said, I would trade away all the new technology we have discovered to get back all the technology we have forgot. There are countless products being produced today, and I mentioned M & M's because the candy industry is teeming with them, that engineers have no damn idea how to create the machine doing the producing.
Interesting point about decades old machinery that would not be understood by all engineers of today. M & M’s!
Say it isn’t so, that’s the best candy. If I still liked candy that would be the candy I would choose! lol

It’s anybody’s guess about which invention and how quickly it will come out to replace the electric car battery idea. It will happen quicker than most would think, It’ll be more about suppressing the new technology to make policy funding pay off.

Btw- I also have a farm connection in my family line. Two of my family lines (out of my four grandparents) came from German ancestors who were farmers. They escaped Germany following religious persecution and came to the US during the second wave. The other 2 lines are from Wales and Scotland. My grandparents on my paternal side were also farmers from my Welsh and Scottish lines. I always have a positive impression when it comes to farming and farmers. I appreciate all of the hard work and effort that was necessary to survive and resulted in the possibility of my own life. It’s hard to grasp the numerous choices and conditions that impacted each single family decision, to determine which children would be born and survive.

My apologies to BackAgain
for straying off course of the topic.
 

ThunderKiss1965

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It's not a case of 're' distribution.
It seems that a lot of Americans think that somebody earning great amounts of money has a right to keep it all to him/herself.
Would you have a dollar in your pocket if you didn't take it from somebody else? Maybe you earned it but others have a need and a right to earn other people's money too.

Just my thoughts on the issue but not a big deal that needs arguing.
Your either trying to troll or you are a loon.
 

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