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Math is Racist.

fncceo

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Because before America became a nation, a slave named Onesimus developed a smallpox vaccine that saved the citizens of Boston

To be fair, Onesimus didn't develop a smallpox vaccine. Onesimus, once a slave in colonial Africa, was able to relate the practice of inoculation being used in European colonies of Africa.

His owner, the American Minister Cotton Mather, was unfamiliar with the concept until educated by Onesimus.
 

mudwhistle

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Like I said, my math is just fine. I'm in here with idiots who believe the election was stolen, that they have the right to spread a deadly virus, that climate change is a hoax, and undoubtedly some of you idiots think the earth is flat and the moon lamding was shot in hollywood.
Moon Lamding?

Let me point out the flaws in your post...aside from spelling errors:
  • The first case of the new COVID variant was a fully vaccinated patient
  • The virus isn't as deadly as advertised
  • Climate Change is real....man-made climate change is a hoax
  • The election was stolen, and we have shown tons of proof, but we can't certify it in court or by audit thanks to armies of Democrat lawyers doing everything in their power to prevent discovery
 

Circe

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You might want to go readca book about inventors instead of repeating the shit you read at the daily stormer.

Because before America became a nation, a slave named Onesimus developed a smallpox vaccine that saved the citizens of Boston.
I've studied smallpox in book after book -- it's by far my favorite disease -- and never heard anything about that and don't believe a word of it. I think this kind of story just gets made up, recently! I have studied a lot of epidemic diseases and blacks never had anything to do with any preventive measures. These empty assertions you blacks make! That blacks have invented so many things! We'd have heard of it if they HAD done anything interesting. If only as a curiosity.

Not that whites have had much success, or any success, with the epidemic we're in now, despite their fake claims.
 

Unkotare

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..... a slave named Onesimus developed a smallpox vaccine ......

YOU should read a book. That is not what happened. You diminish his actual contribution by misrepresenting it.
 

Batcat

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Democrats historically have subjugated blacks. Before the Civil War they made sure they didn't get an education. Now they tell them that an education is white supremacy. Elitist blacks help in this false stereotype.
You can bet many white democrats laugh at the blacks for being so foolish as to vote for democrats.
 

Batcat

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I've studied smallpox in book after book -- it's by far my favorite disease -- and never heard anything about that and don't believe a word of it. I think this kind of story just gets made up, recently! I have studied a lot of epidemic diseases and blacks never had anything to do with any preventive measures. These empty assertions you blacks make! That blacks have invented so many things! We'd have heard of it if they HAD done anything interesting. If only as a curiosity.

Not that whites have had much success, or any success, with the epidemic we're in now, despite their fake claims.

I had never heard of Onesimus either. There is a fascinating story about his life in the article below.

Apparently Cotton Mather, a Puritan minister, wrote of him in his diary.


When a smallpox epidemic ravaged Boston in 1721, a doctor named Zabdiel Boylston got the seemingly crazy idea to expose healthy people to small amounts of pus from smallpox patients. The healthy people would get sick, but not as sick as if they’d caught a full-fledged case of smallpox, and they would have lifelong protection against smallpox. Boylston called it variolation or inoculation, and he got the idea from Puritan minister Cotton Mather, who used his pulpit and his fame to advocate for the wildly unpopular new preventive measure. And Mather, in turn, got the idea from an enslaved man named Onesimus.

***snip***

Nearly everything concrete we know about Onesimus comes from Cotton Mather’s diary, with a few potential glimpses in later church and civic records. We can say for certain that he was an enslaved person in Massachusetts in 1706, but we don’t know whether he was a new arrival in North America or had been there for some time. It’s almost certain that he was born in western Africa, because he’d been inoculated against smallpox as a child in a traditional West African way.

We know that he joined Mather’s household in December 1706, when the Puritan congregation of Boston’s North Church decided that a live human being would be the perfect gift for their fiery witch-trial-veteran minister, Cotton Mather. And we know, of course, that during the years of his enslavement, Onesimus told Mather about inoculation against smallpox.

Additionally, we know that he had a family, a livelihood, and ambitions of his own. Mather’s diary mentions that Onesimus was married, but doesn’t mention any further details about his wife, and that probably means that she didn’t live in the Mather household. We have no way to know if Onesimus’ wife was also enslaved in another household, or if she was a free woman. In either case, the couple had – and lost –at least two sons. One died in 1714, and another in 1716. Mather refers to one of the children as “Onesimulus,” but it’s likely that the minister was just trying out some clever wordplay rather than using the child’s actual name.


Of course it is Cotton Mather who gets the credit for the idea.


Smallpox raged through Boston in 1721, ending in 844 deaths. During this epidemic, physician Zabdiel Boylston, at Cotton Mather's urging, variolated 248 people, thereby introducing variolation to the Americas. Of those variolated, six died. The case fatality for variolation was about 3%, and the disease case fatality was 14%. About 900 people left town for fear of catching the disease.

Howeaver if you do a search for Onesimus on that web site you find…

1706

African Use of Variolation

Cotton Mather, a Boston minister (1663-1728), received a "gift" of a Libyan-born enslaved person named Onesimus, who bore a scar from smallpox variolation in Africa. Mather inquired among other enslaved people and found that many had been variolated and thought themselves immune to the disease.

Later, Mather would read of variolation in English medical journals and promote the practice in Massachusetts.
 

Circe

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I had never heard of Onesimus either. There is a fascinating story about his life in the article below.

Apparently Cotton Mather, a Puritan minister, wrote of him in his diary.


When a smallpox epidemic ravaged Boston in 1721, a doctor named Zabdiel Boylston got the seemingly crazy idea to expose healthy people to small amounts of pus from smallpox patients. The healthy people would get sick, but not as sick as if they’d caught a full-fledged case of smallpox, and they would have lifelong protection against smallpox. Boylston called it variolation or inoculation, and he got the idea from Puritan minister Cotton Mather, who used his pulpit and his fame to advocate for the wildly unpopular new preventive measure. And Mather, in turn, got the idea from an enslaved man named Onesimus.

***snip***

Nearly everything concrete we know about Onesimus comes from Cotton Mather’s diary, with a few potential glimpses in later church and civic records. We can say for certain that he was an enslaved person in Massachusetts in 1706, but we don’t know whether he was a new arrival in North America or had been there for some time. It’s almost certain that he was born in western Africa, because he’d been inoculated against smallpox as a child in a traditional West African way.

We know that he joined Mather’s household in December 1706, when the Puritan congregation of Boston’s North Church decided that a live human being would be the perfect gift for their fiery witch-trial-veteran minister, Cotton Mather. And we know, of course, that during the years of his enslavement, Onesimus told Mather about inoculation against smallpox.

Additionally, we know that he had a family, a livelihood, and ambitions of his own. Mather’s diary mentions that Onesimus was married, but doesn’t mention any further details about his wife, and that probably means that she didn’t live in the Mather household. We have no way to know if Onesimus’ wife was also enslaved in another household, or if she was a free woman. In either case, the couple had – and lost –at least two sons. One died in 1714, and another in 1716. Mather refers to one of the children as “Onesimulus,” but it’s likely that the minister was just trying out some clever wordplay rather than using the child’s actual name.


Of course it is Cotton Mather who gets the credit for the idea.


Smallpox raged through Boston in 1721, ending in 844 deaths. During this epidemic, physician Zabdiel Boylston, at Cotton Mather's urging, variolated 248 people, thereby introducing variolation to the Americas. Of those variolated, six died. The case fatality for variolation was about 3%, and the disease case fatality was 14%. About 900 people left town for fear of catching the disease.

Howeaver if you do a search for Onesimus on that web site you find…

1706

African Use of Variolation

Cotton Mather, a Boston minister (1663-1728), received a "gift" of a Libyan-born enslaved person named Onesimus, who bore a scar from smallpox variolation in Africa. Mather inquired among other enslaved people and found that many had been variolated and thought themselves immune to the disease.

Later, Mather would read of variolation in English medical journals and promote the practice in Massachusetts.
Note that it was Dr. BOYLSTON who promoted the idea, thus getting a very large street in Boston named after him, Boylson Street. And Cotton Mather also promoted it, and of course George Washington, famously, (Well, he mandated it for his army.) This story of this black slave is different with every telling and I'd say was made up for color, so to speak, at the time. The first version I read said this slave had worked with a European family when they had started variolation over there! Here it says it was done in Africa: it wasn't, though. Trust me, if they had invented and used variolation in Africa, we would know! I expect the statement that "other enslaved people" had been variolated is a plain lie. Well, they did develop it first in Istanbul, but that is hardly Africa. Every detail of that great story of overcoming smallpox is known and black slaves just don't come into it. I HATE this sort of thing, where BLM types just MAKE STUFF UP and assert it. This story never showed up before BLM. I've been reading about smallpox for a lot of decades. It's just not true. BLM pops up, the story pops up. Sheeeeeeeeeeesh.

The articles are heavily propaganda: note they keep saying "inoculation," to make it seem like these worthless shots they push us to get, rather than variolation, a dangerous practice but all they had then --- I've always read the death rate was 2%. And I'd give 25 cents to know where this black's supposed scar was ---- hopefully on the hand or wrist. The idea was to find a MILD case and prick the pus into the skin as far away from the main part of the body as possible. One sick person didn't give that much supply, and they had to move him or her around for freshness. 2% is a bad death rate (what Covid has) but smallpox, of course, has a mortality rate of 25 to 35%, if it's not a very virulent outbreak. It can do worse than that.
 

yidnar

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No, they are saying that the mathematics in schools are taught to where only white people can understand..
only whites can understand ? are you saying blacks cant speak English ? wow ! you leftists sure have a low opinions of black people !
 

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